f.192-192v
 
 
 
 

f. 192 (IX. 5-6)

 

to Juste and sir Launcelot smote hym downe and than they fauȝt

vppon foote a noble batayle to gydirs and a myghty And at the

laste sir Launclot smote hym downe grovelynge vppon hys hondys

and hys kneys And than that knyght yelded hym And sir Launce//

lot resseyved hym // Fayre sir seyde the knyght I requyre you tell

me youre name for muche my harte yevith vnto you // Nay seyd sir

Launcelot as at thys tyme I woll nat telle you my name onles that

ye telle me youre name Sertaynly seyde the knyght my name

ys sir Neroveus that was made knyght of my lorde sir Launcelot

du lake A sir Neroveus de lyle seyde sir Launcelot I am ryght glad

that ye ar proved a good knyght for now wyte you well my name

ys sir Launcelot Alas seyde sir Neroveus what haue I done and Þer

with all he felle flatlynge to hys feete and wolde haue kyste

them But sir Launcelot wolde nat suffir hym and than aythir

made grete Joy of oÞer And than sir Neroveus tolde sir Launcelot

that he sholde nat go by the castell of pendragon For there ys a

lorde a myghty knyght and many myghty knyghtes with hym

And thys nyght I harde sey that they toke a knyght presonere

that rode with a damesell and they sey he ys a knyght of Þe rounde

table A seyde sir Launcelot that knyght ys my felow and hym shall

I rescowe and borow or ellis lose my lyff there fore And there with all

he rode faste tyll he cam be fore the castell of Pendrag

anone Þer with all there cam vi knyghtes and all

to sette vppon sir Launcelot at onys Than sir

speare and smote the formyst that he br

and iij of them smote hym and iij f

passed thorow them and lyghtly h

anothir knyght thorow the brest

more than an elle And there

all the remenaunte of Þe iiij k

at sir Launcelot at at euery s


f. 192v (IX.6)

 

strokis that at iiij strokis sundry they avoyded Þer sadyls passynge

sore wounded and furth with all he rorde hurlynge in to Þe castell

And anone the lorde of that castell which was called sir Bryan

de les iles whych was a noble man and a grete enemy to kynge

Arthure So with In a whyle he was armed and on horse backe

And than they feautred Þer spearis and hurled to gydirs so strong/

ly that bothe Þer horsys russhed to the erthe And than they avoyded

Þer sadyls and dressed Þer shyldis and drew Þer swerdis and flowe to

gydirs as wood men and there were many strokis a whyle

At the laste sir Launcelot gaff sir Bryan such a buffette that

he kneled vppon hys knees And than sir Launcelot russhed

vppon hym with grete force and pulled of his helme And whan

sir Bryan sy that he sholde be slayne he yelded hym and put hym

in hys mercy and in hys grace Than sir Launcelot made hym to delyuer

all hys presoners that he had with In hys castell And there

In sir Launcelot founde of kynge Arthurs knyghtes xxx knyghtes

and xl· ladyes and so he delyuerde hem and than he rode his way

And anone as sir La cote male tayle was delyuerde he gate his horse

and hys harneyse and hys damesell Maledysaunte The meane

whyle sir Neroves that sir Launcelot had foughtyn with all be fore

at the brydge he sente a damesell aftir sir Launcelot to wete how

           spedde at the castell of Pendragon And than they in the

                          d what knyght he was that was there whan

                                knyghtes delyuerde all the presoners // Syr

                                    seyde seyde the damesell for the beste

                                      was here and ded thys Jurnay & wyte

                                         elot Than was sir Bryan full glad

                                            hys knyghtes that he sholde wynne

                                                ell and sir Launcelot cote male tayle

                                                   ncelot that had rydden with hem

                                                    n brede her how she had rebuked

 
 

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