III

(Winchester f.45-70v; Caxton IV.1-IV.29; Vinaver, Vol. 1, pp. 125.1-180.25; Shepherd 78.1-112.26)

 

f. 45 (IV.1)

 

SO aftir thes questis of Syr Gawayne Syr

Tor and kynge Pellynore Than hit be felle that Merly//

on felle in dotage on the damesell that knge Pellynore

brought to courte and she was one of the damesels of the lady of the

laake that hyght Nenyve But Merlion wolde nat lette her haue

ne reste but all wayes he wolde be wyth · her And euer she made

M good chere tylle sche had learned of hym all maner of thyng

that sche desyred and he was assoted vppon hir that he

myght nat be from hir // So on a tyme he tolde to kynge

Arthure that he scholde nat endure longe but for all

his craftes he scholde be putte In to the erthe quyk and so

he tolde the kyng many thyngis that scholde be falle

but all wayes he warned the kyng to kepe well his swer//

de and the scawberde scholde be stolyn by a woman frome

hym that he moste trusted // Also he tolde kyng Arthure

that he scholde mysse hym · And yett had ye levir than all

youre londis haue me a gayne // A sayde the kynge syn ye

knowe of youre evil · aduenture purvey for hit and putt

hit a way by youre crauftes that mysse aduenture Nay seyde

M· hit woll not be · he departed frome the kynge And with In

a whyle the damesell of the lake departed and Merlyon

went with her euermore where som euer she yeode and oftyn ty//

mes M· wolde haue had hir prevayly a way by his subtyle

crauftes · Than she made hym to swere that he sholde neuer do

none inchauntemente vppon hir if he wolde haue his wil·

And so he swore · Than she and Merlyon wente ouer Þe see vn

to the londe of Benwyke there as kyng Ban was kyng

that had grete warre a yenste kyng Claudas And there

M· spake with kyng Bayans wyff a fayre lady and a good hir

name was Elayne And there he sawe yonge Launcelot

And there the queene made grete sorowe for the mortal

werre that kyng Claudas made on hir lordis // Take 

 

f. 45v (IV.1-2)

 

none hevynesse seyde Mer· for this same chylde yonge Launce//

lot shall with in this xxti yere revenge you on kyng Claudas

that all crystendom shall speke of hit and this same chylde

shall be the moste man of worship of the worlde and his

fyrst name ys Galahad that know I well seyde Mer· And

syn ye haue confermed hym Launcelot that is trouth seyde

the quene his name was fyrst Galahad A Merlyon seyde

the quene shall I lyve to se my son suche a man of provesse yee

hardely lady on my perelle ye shall se hit and lyve many wyn//

tirs aftir // Than sone aftir the lady and Mer· departed And by

weyes he shewed hir many wondyrs and so come Into Cor//

unayle And all wayes he lay a boute to haue hir maydyn//

hode and she was euer passynge wery of hym and wolde

haue bene delyuerde of hym for she was a ferde of hym for

cause he was a devyls son and she cowde not be skyfte of

of hym by no meane // And so one a tyme Merlyon ded shew

hir in a roche where as was a grete wondir and wrought

by enchauntement that went vndir a grete stone · So by hir

subtyle worchyng she made Mer· to go vndir that stone to latte

hir wete of the meruayles there but she wrought so there for hym

that he come neuer oute for all the craufte he coude do and so

she departed and leffte Mer· And as kyng Arthure rode to Came//

lot and helde there a grete feste with myrth and Joy // And

sone aftir he returned vnto Cardolle And Þer come vnto Ar//

thure newe tydynges that the kyng of Denmarke and the

kyng of Irelonde that was his brothir And the kyng of Þe

vale and the kynge of Sorleyse And the kyng of Þe Ile of

Longtaynse all these v· kynges with a grete oste was entirde In

to the londis of kyng Arthure and brent and slewe and dis//

troyed clene by fore hem bothe Þe citeis and castels that hit

was pite to here // Alas seyde Arthure yet had neuer reste

 

f. 46 (IV.2)

 

one monethe syne I was kynge crowned of this londe · Now

shall I neuer reste tylle I mete with the kyngis In a fayre felde

that I make myne a vow for my trwe lyege peple shall

nat be destroyed In my defauȝte Þer fore go with me who so

woll and a byde who that wyll // Than kyng Arthure

lette wryte vnto kyng Pellynor and prayde hym In all

haste to make hym redy with suche peple as we myght

lyghtlylyeste arere and to hyȝe hym aftir In haste · Than

all the barownes were wrothe prevayly that Þe kynge

wolde departe so suddaynly but the kynge by no meane wolde

a byde but made wrytyng vnto them that were nat ther

and bade hyȝe them aftir hym suche as were nat at that

tyme at that courte // Than the kynge come to quene

Gwenyuer and seyde vnto her madame make you redy for

ye shall go with me for I may nat longe mysse you ye shall

cause me to be the more hardy what adventure so be falle

me ȝette woll I nat wyȝte my lady to be in no Joupardye

Sir she seyde I am at youre commaundemente and shall be

redy at all tymesn · So on Þe morne the kynge and Þe quene

departed with suche felyship as they had and come In to a Þe north

In to a foreste be syde Humbir and there lodged hem //

So whan this worde come vnto the v· kynges a bovyn

seyde Þat Arthure was be syde Humbir In a foreste · So

there was a knyght brothir vnto one of Þe ·v· kynges that

gaff hem suche counseyle · ye knowe well that Sir Arthur

hath the floure of chevalry of the worlde with hym And

hit preved by the grete bay batayle he did with the ·xi kynges

and there fore hyȝe ȝe vnto hym nyght and day tyll that

we be nyȝe hym for the lenger he taryeth the bygger

 

f. 46v (IV.2-3)

 

he is and we euer the weyker and he is so corageous of hym

self that he is com to the felde with lytyll peple and there

fore lette vs sette vppon hym or day and we shall sle dow//

ne of his knyghtes that none shall helpe oÞer of them // Soo

vnto this counseyle these ·v· kynges assented and so they passed

forth with hir oste thorow north walys and come vppon

Arthure be nyght and sette vppon his oste as the kynge

and his knyghtes were in theire pavylyons · So kynge

Arthure was vnarmed and leyde hym to reste with his

quene Gwenyuere Sir seyde sir kayyns hit is nat beste

we be vnarmed we shall haue no nede seyde Sir Gaway//

ne and Sir Gryflet Þat lay In a lytyll pauylyon by the

kynge // So with that they harde a grete noyse & many

cryed treson // Alas seyde Arthure we be be trayed vnto

armys felowys than he cryed · So they were armed a

none at all poyntes // Than come Þer a wounded knyȝt

vnto the kynge and seyde Sir saue youre self and my

lady the quene for oure oste is destroyed and slayne is

much of oure peple So a none the kynge and Þe quene

and the ·iij· knyghtes toke hir horses and rode toward

Humbir to passe ouer hit and the watir was so rowȝe pat

they were a ferde to pass ouer it // Now may ye chose

seyde kynge Arthure whethir ye woll a byde and take

the adventure on this syde for and ye be takyn they wol

sle you yet were me leuer to dey in this watir than to

falle in youre enemyes handis / Seyde the quene and

there to be slayne // And as they stode talkyng Sir

Kayns saw the ·v· kynges commynge on horsebak by hem 

 

f. 47 (IV.3)

 

self a lone wyth hir sperys In hir hondis evyn towarde

hem // Lo seyde Sir kayns yondir be the ·v· kynges lette vs

go to them and macche hem · That were foly seyde Sir

Gawayne For we ar but ·iiij· and they be fyve · That

is trouth seyde Sir Gryfflette no force seyd sir Kayns

I woll vndir take for ·ij· of the beste of hem and than

may ye ·iij· vndir take for all the othir ·iij // And there

with all Sir Kay lette his horse renne as faste as he myght

to encountir with one of them And strake one of Þe kynges

thorow the shelde and also the body a fadom that Þe kyng

felle to the erthe starke dede // That sawe Sir Gaway//

ne and ran vnto a nothir kyng so harde that he smote

hym downe and thorow the body with a spere that he felle

to the erthe dede // Than Sir Gryfflet ran to Þe ·iiij·

kynge and gaff hym such a falle that his necke brake

In sondir // Anone Sir Arthure ran to an othir and

smote hym thorow the body with a spere that he fell to the

erthe dede // Than Sir Kay ran vnto the ·v· kynge and

smote hym so harde on the helme that the stroke clave

the helme and hede to the erthe · That was well stry//

ken seyde kynge Arthure and worshipfully haste Þou holde

thy promyse there fore I shall honoure the whyle that

I lyve · And there with all they sette the quene in a barge

In to Humbir · But all wayes quene Gwenyuere pray//

sed Sir Kay for his dedis and seyde what lady that ye love

and she love you nat a gayne she were gretly to blame

And a monge all ladyes seyde the quene I shall bere your

noble fame for ye spake a grete worde and fulfylled

hit worshipfully // And Þer with the quene departed // Than

the kynge and the ·iij· knyghtes rode in to the forerte

for there they supposed to here of them that were ascaped 

 

f. 47v (IV.3-4)

 

and there founde Þe moste party of his peple and tolde hem

how Þe moste party of Þe ·v· kynges were dede And there fore

lette vs holde vs to gedyrs tyll hit be day // And whan

hir oste haue aspyed that Þer chyfteynes be slayne they woll

make such dole that they shall nat helpe hem self · And

ryght as the kynge seyde so hit was · For whan they founde

the ·v· kynges dede they made such dole that they felle downe

of there horsis // And there with all com In kyng Arthure

but with a fewe peple and slewe on the ryght honde and

the lyffte honde that well nye Þer ascaped no man but all

were slayne to Þe numbir of xxxti Ml· And whan Þe batayle

was all ended the kynge kneled downe and thanked god

mekely And than he thank sente for Þe quene And anone

she was com and made grete Joy of Þe ouer commynge of

                        Þat batayle // There with all come one to kynge Arthure

and tolde hym that kynge Pellynore was with In ·iij

myle with a grete oste and seyde go vnto hym and let hym

vndirstonde how we haue spedde · So with in a whyle kyng

Pellynore com with a grete oste and salewed the peple &

the kynge and there was grete Joy on euery syde // Than

the kynge let serch how many peple he had slayne and there

was founde but lytyll paste ·ij·C· men slayne and ·viij

knyghtes of the table rounde In Þer pauylyons // Than the

kynge lat rere and devyse In the same place there as

the batayle was done and made a fayre abbay & endewed

hit with grete lyvelode and let calle hit the abbay of La be//

ale aduenture but whan som of them come In to there

contrayes Þer as the ·v· kynges were kynges and tolde hem

how they were slayne there was made grete dole · And all

the kynge Arthurs enemyes as the kynge of North walis

and the kynges of the northe knewe of this batayle they 

 

f. 48 (IV.4-5)

 

were passynge hevy And so Þe kynge retourned vnto Came//

lot In haste And whan he was com to Camelot and

he called kyng Pellynore vnto hym and seyde ye vndir//

stonde well that we haue loste ·viij· knyghtes of Þe beste

of the table rounde and by youre aduyse we muste chose

viij· knyghtes of Þe beste we may fynde In this courte Sir

seyde Pellynore I shall counsayle you aftir my conceyte

the beste wyse // There ar In youre courte full noble

knyghtes bothe of olde and yonge And be myne advyse ye

shall chose half of the olde and half of the yonge / whych

be the olde seyde kynge Arthure Sie me semyth kynge

Vryence that hath wedded youre Sistir Morgan le fay

And the kynge of the lake · And Sir hervyse de reuell a

noble knyght · And Sir Galagars the fourÞe · This is

well devysed seyde Arthure and ryght so shall hit be //

Now whyche ar the ·iiij· yonge knyghtes Sir the fyrste is

Sir Gawayne youre nevew that is as good a knyght of

his tyme as is ony In this londe And the secunde as me

semyth beste is Sir Gryfflette le fyse de du that is a good

knyght and full desyrous In armys · And who may se hym

lyve he shall preve a good knyght · And the thirde as me

semyth ys well worthy to be one of the table rounde

Sir Kay the Senesciall for many tymes he hath done

full worshipfully · And now at youre laste batayle he dud

full honorably for to vndirtake to sle ·ij· kynges // Be my

hede seyde Arthure ye sey soth he is beste worthy to be

a knyght of rounde table of ony that is rehersed yet · And

he had done no more provesse his lyve dayes // Now seyde

kynge Pellynore chose you of ·ij· knyghtes that I shall re//

herce whyche is moste worthy of Sir Bagdemagus &

Sir Tor my son but for be cause he is my son I may nat

 

f. 48v (IV.5)

 

prayse hym but ellys and he were nat my son I durste

say that of his age Þer is nat In this londe a better knyght

than he is noÞer of bettir condycions and loth to do ony wro//

nge and loth to take ony wronge // Be my hede seyde

Arthure he is a passyng good knyght as ony ye spake of

this day that wote I well seyde the kynge for I haue

sene hym proved but he seyth but lytil · but he doth much

more for I know none In all this courte and he were

as well borne on his modir syde as he is on youre syde

that is lyke hym of provesse and of myght · And there fore

I woll haue hym at this tyme and leve Sir Bagdema//

gus tyll a nothir tyme // So whan they were chosyn by

the assent of the barouns · So were there founden In hir

Seges euery knyghtes name Þat here ar reherced and so were

they sette In hir Seges where of Sir Bagdemagus tyll

a nothir tyme was wondirly wrothe that Sir Tor was

avaunced a fore hym and there fore soddeynly he departed

from Þe courte and toke his squyre with hym and rode

longe In a foreste tyll they come to a crosse and there he

a lyght and seyde his prayers devoutely · The meane

whyle his squyre founde wretyn vppon the crosse that

Bagdemagus sholde neuer retourne vnto the courte a

gayne tyll he had wonne a knyght of the table rounde

body for body // Loo seyde his squyer here I fynde wrytyng

of you there fore I rede you returne a gayne to Þe courte

That shall I neuer seyde Bagdemagus tyll men speke of

me ryght grete worship and that I be worthy to be a

knght of Þe rounde table ·/ And so he rode forth & there

by the way he founde a braunche of holy herbe that was

the signe of the Sancgreall and no knyght founde no

suche tokyns · but he were a good lyver and a man of  

 

f. 49 (IV.5-6)

 

provesse // So as Sir Bagdemagus rode to se many Adven//

tures So hit happed hym to com to the roche there as

the lady of the lake had put Mer· vndir Þe stone and there

he herde hym make a grete dole where fore Sir Bag//

demagus wolde haue holpyn hym and wente vnto Þe

grete stone and hit was so hevy that an hondred men

myght nat lyffte hit vp // whan Merlyon wyste that

he was Þer he bade hym leve his laboure for all was In

vayne for he myght neuer be holpyn but by hir her that put

hym there And so Bagdemagus departed and dud many

adventures and preved aftir a full good knyght & come

a yen to the courte and was made knyght of the rounde

table // So on the morne there be felle new tydyngis

and many othir adventures

TThan hit be felle that Arthure and many of

his knyghtes rode on huntynge In to a grete fo//

reste And hit happed kynge Arthure and kynge

Vryence and Sir Accalon of Gawle folowed a grete

harte · For they ·iij· were well horsed And so they chaced

so faste that with In a whyle they ·iij· were more than x

myle from her felyshep And at the laste they chaced so

sore that they slewe hir horsis vndir nethe them And the

horses were so fre that they felle downe dede . Than we//

re all ·iij· on foote and euer they saw the harte be fore them

passynge wery And In boced ·/ What shall we do seyde

Kynge Arthure we ar harde be stadde lette vs go on foote

seyde kynge Vryence tyll we may mete with somme lodgyng

// Than were they ware of the harte that lay on a gete

watir banke and a brachette bytyng on his throte & mo

othir houndis come aftir // Than kynge Arthure blewe

the pryce and dyght the harte · Than the kynge loked

 

f. 49v (IV.6)

 

a boute the worlde and sawe be fore hym In a grete water

a lytyll shippe all apparayled with sylke downe to the watir

And the shippe cam ryght vnto them and landed on the

sandis · Than Arthure wente to the banke and loked In

and saw none erthely creatures there In // Sirs seyde

the kynge com thens and let vs se what is In this shippe

So at the laste they wente In to the shippe all ·iij· & founde

hit rychely be hanged with cloth of sylke · So by that tyme

hit was durke nyght there suddeynly was a boute them

an C· torchis sette vppon all the shyppe bordis and hit

gaff grete lyght and there with all there com ·xij· fayre

damesels and salued kynge Arthure on hir kneis and

called hym be his name and seyde he was ryght well

com And suche chere as they had he sholde haue of the

beste than the kynge thanked hem fayre // There wyth

all they ledde the kynge and his felowys In to a fayre

chambir and there was a clothe leyde rychely be seyne

of all Þat longed to a table and there were they serued

of all wynes and metys that they coude thynke of

But of that the kynge had gerete mervayle For he

neuer fared bettir In his lyff as for one souper // And

so whan they had souped at her leyser kyng Arthure

was lad In to a chambir a rycher be sene chambir sawe

he neuer none · And so was kynge Vryence seued & lad

In to such a nothir chambir · And Sir Accolon was lad

In to the thirde chambir passyng rychely and well be

sayne and so were they leyde in Þer beddis easyly · And a

none they felle on slepe and slepte merveylously sore

all the nyght · And on the morne kynge vryence was

In Camelot a bedde In his wyves Armys Morgan le fay

And whan he woke he had grete mervayle how he com  

 

f. 50 (IV.6-7)

 

there for on the evyn be fore he was ·ij· dayes Jurney

frome Camelot And whan kyng Arthure a woke he

founde hym self In a durke preson heryng a boute hym

many complayntes of wofull knyghtes what ar ye Þat

so complayne seyde kyng Arthure we bene here ·xxti·

knyghtes presoners and som of vs hath layne here ·viij

yere and som more and somme lesse · For what cause seyde

Arthure we shall tell you seyde the knyghtes // This

lorde of this castell · his name is Sir Damas and he

is the falsyst knyght that lyvyth and full of treson

and a very cowarde as lyvyth And he hath a yonger

brothir a good knyght of provesse and his name is Sir

Ounȝtlake And this traytoure Damas Þe elder broÞer

woll geff hym no parte of his londis · but as Sir Out//

lake kepyth thorow provesse of his hondis and so he kepith

frome hym a full fayre maner and a rych and Þer In

Sir Outlake dwellyth worshypfully and is well be

loved with all peple And this Sir Damas oure mayster

is a evyll be loved for he is with oute mercy and he is a

cowarde and grete warre hath bene be twyxte them

But Outlake hath euer the bettir and euer he proferyth

Sir Damas to fyght for the lyvelode body for body

but he woll nat of hit oÞer ellys to fynde a knyght to

fyght for hym // vnto that sir Damas hath grauntid

to fynde a knyght but he is so evyll be loved and hated

that Þer is no knyght woll fyght for hym And whan

Damas saw this that Þer was neuer a knyght wolde

fyght for hym he hath dayly layne a wayte wyth

many a knyght with hym and takyn all the knyghtes

In this contray to se & a spye hir aventures he hath

takyn hem by force & brought hem to his preson    

 

f. 50v (IV.7)

 

And so toke he vs seuerally as we rode on oure adventu//

res and many good knyghtes hath deyde In this preson

for hunger to the numbir of ·xviij· knyghtes And yf ony

of vs all that here is or hath bene wolde haue fough//

tyn with his broÞer Outlake he wolde haue delyuerde vs

// But for be cause this Damas ys so false and so

full of treson we wolde neuer fyght for hym to dye

for hit And we be so megir for hungir that vnnethe

we may stonde on oure fete god delyuer you for his gete

mercy // A none with all come a damesel vnto Arthure &

asked hym what chere I can nat sey seyde Arthure sir

seyde she and ye woll fyȝt for my lorde ye shall be delyuer//

de oute of preson and ellys ye ascape neuer with Þe lyff · Now

seyde Arthure that is harde yet had I leuer fyght with a knyȝt

than to dey In preson // wyth this seyde Arthure I may

be delyuerde and all thes presoners I woll do the batayle ·

yes seyde the damesell · Than I am redy seyde Arthure

and I had horse and armoure · ye shall lak none seyde Þe

damesell · Me semeÞ damesell I shold haue sene you In the

courte of Arthure Nay seyde the damesell I cam neuer there

I am the lordis douȝter of this castell · yet was she false

for she was one of the damesels of Morgan le fay · Anone

she wente vnto Sir Damas and tolde hym how he wolde

do batayle for hym And so he sente for Arthure And whan

he com he was well coloured and well made of his lymmes

that all knyghtes that sawe hym seyde hit were pite that

suche a knyght sholde dey in preson // So sir Damas and

he were a greed that he sholde fyght for hym vppon this

covenaunte that all the othir knyghtes sholde be delyuerde

And vnto that was sir Damas sworne vnto Arthur and

Also he to do the batayle to the vttermoste · And with that all the

 

f. 51 (IV.7-8)

 

xxti· knyghtes were brought oute of the durke preson In to the

halle and delyuerde hem And so they all a bode to se the batayle

// Now turne we vnto Accalon of Gaule that whan he a

woke he founde hym self by a depe welles syde with with In

half a foote In grete perell of deth · And Þer com oute of Þat

fountayne a pype of syluer and oute of Þat pype ran water

all on hyȝe In a stone of Marbil · whan sir Accolon sawe

this he blyssed hym and seyde Jhu saue my lorde Kynge

Arthure and Kynge Vryence for thes damysels In this

shippe hath be trayed vs they were fendis & no women

and if I may ascape this mys adventure I shall distroye

them all that I may fynde of thes false damysels Þat faryth

thus with theire Inchauntementes // And ryght with Þat there

com a dwarf with a grete mowÞe and a flatte nose & salewed

Sir Accalon and tolde hym how he cam fromme quene Mor//

gan le fay and she gretys yow well and byddyth you be

of stronge herte for ye shall fyght to morne wyth a

knyght at the houre of pryme And there fore she hath

sent the Excalebir Arthurs swerde and the scawberde

and she byddyth you as ye love her that ye do that batay//

le to the vttirmoste with oute ony mercy lyke as ye promy//

sed hir whan ye spoke laste to gedir In prevyte · And what

damesell that bryngyth her the Kynges hede whyche ye

shall fyght with all · she woll make hir a quene // Now

I vndirstonde you seyde Accalon I shall holde that I haue

promysed her now I haue Þe swerde Sir whan sawe ye my

lady Morgan le fay Ryght late seyde Þe dwarff · Than Ac//

calon toke hym In his armys and sayde recommaunde me

vnto my lady the quene and telle hir all shall be done

that I promysed hir and ellis I woll dye for hit // Now I

suppose seyde Accalon she hath made all this crauftis & 

 

f. 51v (IV.8)

 

enchauntemente for this batayle · Sir ye may well be

leve hit seyde the dwarff // Ryght so Þer come a knyght and

a lady wyth ·vi· squyers and salewed Accalon & prayde

hym to a ryse & com and reste hym at his maner // And

so Accalon mounted vppon a voyde horse and wente with

the kyng vnto a fayre maner by a pryory · And there he

had passyng good chere // Than sir Damas sente vn

to his brothir Outelake and bade make hym redy be

to morne at Þe houre of pryme and to be In the felde

to fyght with a good knyght fo he had founden a knyght

that was redy to do batayle at all poyntis // whan Þis

worde come to sir Outlake he was passyng hevy for

he was woundid a lytyll to fore thorow bothe his thyg//

hes with a glayve and he made grete dole but as he was

wounded he wolde a takyn the batayle an honde // So

hit happed at Þat  tyme by the meanys of Morgan le fay

Accalon was with sir Ouȝtlake lodged And whan he harde

of that batayle and how Ouȝtlake was wounded he

seyde Þat he wolde fyght for hym be cause that Morgan

le fay had sent hym Excaliber and the shethe for to fyȝt

with the kyght on the morne //  This was the cause Sir

Accalon toke the batayle vppon hym // Than sir Outelake

was passyng glad and thanked sir Accolon with all his herte

that he wolde do so muche for hym And Þer with all Sir Out//

lake sente vnto his broÞer Sir Damas that he hadde a

knyght redy that sholde fyght with hym In the felde be

the houre of pryme // So on the morne Sir Arthure

was armed and well horsed And asked Sir Damas

whan shall we to the felde sir seyde sir Damas ye shall

hyre masse And so Arthure herde a masse // And whan

masse was done there com a squyre and and asked sir

 

f. 52 (IV.8-9)

 

Damas if his knyght were redy for oure kyght is

redy In the felde // Than sir Arthure mounted vppon

horsebak and Þer were all the knyghtes and comons of that

contray and so by all Þer advyces there was chosyn ·xij good

men of the contrey for to wayte vppon the ·ij· knyghtes &

ryght as Arthure was on horsebak there com a damesel ·

frommeMorgan le fay and brought vnto Sir Arthure a

swerde lyke vnto Excaliber and Þe scawberde and seyde vn//

to Arthure she sendis here youre swerde for grete love

and he thanke hir and wente hit had bene so but she was

falce for Þe swerde and Þe scawberde was counterfete and

brutyll and false

Than they dressed hem on ij· partyes of the felde &

lette Þer horses ren so faste that aythir smote oÞer

In the myddis of Þe shelde and Þer sperys helde Þat

bothe horse and man wente to the erthe and than they

stert vp bothe and pulde oute Þer swerdis // The meane

whyle that they were thus at Þe batayle com Þe damesel ·

of Þe lake In to the felde Þat put Merlyon vndir the stone

and she com thidir for the love of kynge Arthur · For she

knew how Morgan le fay had ordayned for Arthur shold

haue bene slayne that day and Þer fore she com to save his

lyff · And so they went egerly to the batayle and gaff many

grete strokes but all wayes Arthurs swerde bote nat

lyke Accalons swerde and for the moste party euery stroke

that Accalon gaff he wounded Sir Arthure sore that

hit was meruayle he stood And all wayes his blood felle

frome hym faste whan Arthure be helde the grounde

so sore be bledde he was dismayde · And than he demed

treson that his swerde was chonged · For his swerde

bote nat steele as hit was wonte to do there fore

 

f. 52v (IV.9)

 

he dred hym sore to be dede for euer hym semyd that the

swerde In Accalons honde was Excaliber For at euery

stroke that Accalon stroke he drewe bloode on Arthure

// Now knyght seyde Accolon vnto Arthure kepe Þe well

frome me · But Arthure Answerde not a gayne but

gaff hym suche a buffette on the helme that he made

hym to stowpe nyȝe fallyng to the erthe // Than Sir

Accalon wyth drewe hym a lytyll and com on wyth

Excaliber on heyȝt and smote sir Arthure suche a buff//

ette that he fylle ny to the erthe · Than were they bo//

the wrothe oute of mesure and gaff many sore strokis

But all wayes Sir Arthure loste so muche bloode Þat

hit was mervayle he stood on his feete but he was

so full of knyghthode that he endured the payne And sir

Accolon loste nat a dele of blood Þer fore he waxte pas//

synge lyght And sir Arthure was passynge fyeble and

veryly to haue dyed But for all that he made counte//

naunce as he myght welle endure and helde Accolon

as shorte as he myght // But Accolon was so bolde

be cause of Excalyber that he wexed passyng hardy

But all men that be helde hem seyde they sawe nevir

knyght fyght so well as Arthur ded conciderynge the

bloode that he had bled But all that peple were

sory that thes ·ij· brethirne wolde nat accorde So all

wayes they fought to gedir as fers knyghtes And at

the laste kynge Arthure with drew hym a lytyll for to

reste hym And Sir Accolon callyd hym to batayle

and seyde hit is no tyme for me to suffir the to reste

And there with he come fersly vppon Arthure But Arthur

there with was wrothe for the bloode that he had loste

And smote Accolon on hyȝe vppon the helme so myghtyly

 

 

 

                                    That he

 

f. 53 (IV.9-10)

Þat he

made hym nyȝe falle to the erthe And there with Arthurs 

swerde braste at the crosse and felle on the grasse a mon//

ge the bloode and the pomell And the sure handyls he

helde In his honde // whan Kynge Arthure saw that

he was In grete feare to dye but all wayes he helde

vp his shelde and loste no grounde noÞer batyd no chere

Than sir Accolon be gan with wordis of treson and seyde

knyght Þou art ouer com and mayste nat endure and

also Þou art wepynles and loste Þou haste much of thy

bloode and I am full loth to sle the · there fore yelde

the to me recreaunte // Nay seyde Sir Arthur I may

nat so · For I promysed by the feythe of my body to do

this batayle to the vttermuste whyle my lyff lastith

And Þer fore I had levir to dye with honour than to lyve with

shame And if hit were possible for me to dye an ·C·

tymes I had levir to dye so ouste than yelde me to the

for though I lak wepon yett shall I lak no worshippe

And if Þou sle me wepynles that shall be thy shame

// welle seyde Accolon as for that shame I woll nat

spare · Now kepe the fro me for Þou art but a dede man

And there with Accolon gaff hym such a stroke that he

felle nyȝe to the erthe And wolde haue had Arthure 

to haue cryed hym mercy But Sir Arthure preced

vnto Accolon with his shelde and gaff hym wyth the

pomell In his honde suche a buffette that he reled

iij· strydes a bake // whan the damesell of the lake be

helde Arthure how full of provesse his body was & the

false treson that was wrought for hym to haue

had hym slayne she had grete pete that so good a knyȝt

and such a man of worship sholde so be destroyed // And

at the nexte storke Sir Accolon stroke at hym suche

 

f. 53v (IV.10)

 

a stroke that by the damesels Inchauntemente Þat the

swerde Excaliber felle oute of Accalons honde to

the erthe And there with all sir Arthure lyȝtly lepe to

hit and gate hit In his honde and forth with all he knew

hit Þat hit was his swerde Excalyber A seyde Arthure Þou

haste bene frome me all to longe and muche damage

hast Þou done me and there with he aspyed the scawberde

by his syde and suddaynly he sterte to hym and pulled

the scawberte frome hym and threw hit frome hym as

fer as he myght throw hit // A sir knyght seyde Kynge

Arthur this day haste Þou done me grete damage wyth

this swerde Now ar ye com vnto youre deth for I shall

nat warraunte you but ye shall be as well rewarded

with this swerde or euer we departe as ye haue rewarded me

for muche payne haue ye made me to endure and much

blood haue ye loste ·/ And Þer with sir Arthure raced on

hym with all his myght and pulde hym to the erthe and

than raced of his helme and gaff hym suche a buffette

on his hede that the bloode com oute at his erys nose

and mowÞe // Now woll I sle the seyde Arthure sle me

ye may well seyde sir Accolon and hit please you for ye

ar the beste knyght Þat euer I founde and I se well that god

is with you  But for I promysed seyde Accolon to do this

batayle to the vttirmyst and neuer to be recreaunte while

I leved there fore shall I neuer yelde me with my body what

mowÞe but god do with my body what he woll / Than sir

Arthure remembirde hym and thought he scholde haue

sene this knyght // Now telle me seyde Arthure or I woll

sle the of what contrey ye be and of what courte // Sir

knyght seyde sir Accolon I am of the ryall courte of kyng

Arthure and my name is Accolon of Gaule Than was

 

f. 54 (IV.10-11)

 

Arthure more di smayde than he was to fore honde for

than he remembirde hym of his sistir Morgan le fay And

of the enchauntement of the shippe ·A sir kyght I pray you

who gaff you this swerde and by whom ye had hit // Than

sir Accolon be thought hym and seyde wo worthe this

swerde for by hit I haue gotyn my deth // hit may well

be seyde the kynge // Now sir seyde Accolon I woll tell you

this swerde hath bene In my kepynge Þe moste party of this

xij· monthe And Morgan le fay kyng Vryence wyff sente

hit me yestirday by a dwarfe to the entente to sle kynge

Arthure hir brothir for ye shall vndirstonde Þat kynge

Arthur ys the man In the worlde Þat she hatyth moste

be cause he is moste of worship and of provesse of ony of

hir bloode · Also she lovyth me oute of mesure as paramour

and I hir a gayne And if she myght bryng hit a boute

to sle Arthure by hir crauftis she wolde sle hir husbonde

Kynge Vryence lyghtly And than had she devysed to ha//

ue me kynge In this londe and so to reigne and she to

be my quene But that is now done seyde Accolon for I

am sure of my deth ·// well seyde Kyng Arthure I fele

by you ye wolde haue bene kynge of this londe yett

hit had be grete damage to haue destroyed your lorde

seyde Arthure hit is trouthe seyde Accolon but now I

haue tolde you the trouthe where fore I pray you tell

me of whens ye ar and of what courte // A Accolon

seyde Kynge Arthure now y let the wete that I am

kynge Arthure that Þou haste done grete damage te

// whan Accolon herd that he cryed on lowde fayre

swete lorde haue mercy on me for I knew you nat A

Sir Accolon seyde kynge Arthur mercy Þou shalt haue be cau//

se I fele be thy wordis at this tyme thou knewest me

 

f. 54v (IV.11-12)

 

nat // But I fele by thy wordis Þat Þouhaste a greed

to the deth of my persone and Þer fore Þouart a traytoure

but I wyte the Þe lesse for my sistir Morgan le fay by

hir false crauftis made the to a gre to hir fals lustes

but I be sore avenged vppon hir that all crystendom

shall speke of hit god knowyth I haue honoured hir an-d

worshipped hir more than all my kyn & more haue I

trusted hir than my wyff and all my kyn aftir // Than

Kynge Arthure called the kepers of the felde and seyde

sirres commyth hyder for here ar we ·ij· knyghtes that

haue foughtyn vnto grete damage vnto vs bothe

and lykly eche of vs to haue slayne oÞer and had ony of

vs knowyn othir here had had bene no batayle nothir

no stroke stryken // Than all a lowde cryed Accolon

vnto all the knyghtes and men that were & seyde a

lordis this knyght Þat I haue foughten with all is the

moste man of provesse and of worship In the worlde

for hit is hym self kynge Arthure oure all lyege

lorde and with mysse happe and mysse adventure haue

I done this batayle with Þe lorde and Kynge that I am

with holdyn with all // Than all the peple felle downe

on her knees and cryed kynge Arthure mercy / mercy

shall ye haue seyde Arthure here may ye se what

soddeyn adventures be fallys onftyn of arraunte

knyghtes how that I haue foughtyn with a knyght of

myne owne vnto my grete damage and his bothe

// But syrs be cause I am sore hurte and he bothe

And I had grete nede of a lytyll reste ye shall vndir//

stonde this shall be thy opynyon be twyxte you ·ij· bre//

thirne as to Þe Sir Damas for whom I haue bene

champyon and wonne Þe felde of this knyght yett

 

f. 55 (IV.12)

 

woll I Juge be cause ye Sir Damas ar called an er//

gulus knyght and full of vylony and nat worth

of provesse of youre dedis // There fore woll I that ye

geff vnto youre broÞer all the hole maner with Þe apporte//

naunce vndir this fourme that sir Outelake holde

the maner of you and yerely to gyff you a palfrey to

ryde vppon for Þat woll be com you bettir to ryde on

than vppon a courser // Also I charge the sir Damas

vppon payne of deth that Þou neuer distresse no knyghtes

araunte Þat ryde on Þer adventure // And also Þat Þou restore

thyse ·xx· knyghtes that Þou haste kepte longe presoners

of all theire harmys that they be contente for and ony

of them com to my courte and complayne on the be

my hede Þou shalt dye Þer fore // Also sir Ouȝtlake as to

you be cause ye ar named a good knyght and full of

provesse and trew and Jantyll in all youre dedis · this shall

be youre charge I woll gyff you that in all goodly hast

ye com vnto me and my courte And ye shall be a knyȝt

of myne and if youre dedis be Þer aftir I shall so preferre

you by the grace of god Þat ye shall In shorte tyme be

In ease as for to lyve as worshipfully as youre broÞer

Damas God thonke youre largenesse of youre geete

grete goodnesse and of youre bounte I shall be frome

hens forewarde In all tymes at your commaundement

For sir Ouȝtlake as god wolde I was hurte but late

with an adventures knyght thorow bothe the thyghes

and ellys had I done this batayle with you · God wolde

seyde sir Arthure hit had bene so for than had nat I

bene hurte as I am I shall tell you the cause why

for I had nat bene hurte as I am had nat bene my//

ne owne swerde that was stolyn frome me by treson

 

f. 55v (IV.12-13)

 

And this batayle was ordeyned a fore honde to haue

slayne me And so hit was brouȝte to Þe purpose by false

treson and by enchauntment // Alas seyde sir Outlake

Þat is grete pyte that euer so noble a man as ye ar

of your dedis and provesse that ony man or woman

myght fynde In Þer hertis to worche ony treson a ȝenst

you I shall rewarde them seyde Arthure Now telle me

ar ·ij· dayes Jurney I wolde be at som place of worship

seyde sir Arthure that I myght reste me · Sir seyde

Outlake here by is a ryche abbey of youre elders

foundacion of Nunnys but ·iij· myle hens // So the

kynge toke his leue of all the peple and mounted

vppon horsebak And sir Accolon with hym And whan they

were com to the abbey he lete fecch lechis & serchid

his woundis And sir Accolons bothe but sir Accolon

deyed with In iiij· dayes for he had bled so much blood

that he myght nat lyve // But Kynge Arthure

was well recouerde · So whan Accolon was dede

he lette sende hym In an horse bere with ·vi· knyghtes

vnto Camelot and bade bere hym vnto my systir

Morgan le fay and sey Þat I sende her hym to a present

And telle hir I haue my swerde Excalyber and Þe

scawberde so they departe with the body // The meane

whyle Morgan le fay had wente kynge Arthure had

bene dede So on a day she aspyed kynge Vryence lay

on slepe on his bedde than she callyd vnto hir a may//

den of her counseyle and sayde go fecche me my lordes

swerde · for I sawe neuer bettir tyme to sle hym than

now · A madame seyde the damesell and ye sle my

lorde ye can neuer a scape · Care Þe not sayde Morgan

 

f. 56 (IV.13-14)

 

for now I se my tyme is beste to do hit And Þer fore hyȝe

the faste and fecche me the swerde // Than this da//

mesell departed and founde sir Vwayne slepyng vppon

a bedde In a nothir chambir So she wente vnte sir

Vwayne and a waked hym and bade hym a ryse and

a wayte on my lady youre modir for she woll sle

Þe kynge youre fadir slepynge on his bedde for I go

to fecch his swerde well seyde sir Vwayne Go on your

way and lette me dele · Anone Þe damesell brought

Þe quene the swerde with quakyng hondis and lyghtly

she toke the swerde and pullyd hit oute and wente

boldely vnto Þe beddis syde and a wayted how and

where she myght sle hym beste And as she hevyd

vp Þe swerde to smyte sir · vwayne lepte vnto his

modir and cauȝt hir by the honde and seyde · A fende 

what wolt Þou do · And Þou were nat my modir with

this swerde I sholde smyte of thyne hede · A · seyde

sir Vwayne men seyde Þat Merlyon was be gotyn

of a fende but I may sey an erthely fende bare me

A· fayre son vwayne haue mercy vppon me I was

tempted with a fende where fore fore I cry Þe mercy

I woll neuer more do so and saue my worship & discouer

me nat · On this covenaunte seyde sir Vwayne I wol

for gyff you so ye woll neuer be a boute to do such dedis

Nay son and that I make you assuraunce

Than come tydynges vnto Morgan le fay Þat

Accolon was dede and his body brought

vnto the chirche And how Kyng Arthure

had his swerde a yen // But whan quene Morgan

wyste Þat Accolon was dede she was so sorowfull Þat

nye hir herte to braste · But by cause she wolde

 

f. 56 (IV.13-14)

 

for now I se my tyme is beste to do hit And Þer fore hyȝe

the faste and fecche me the swerde // Than this da//

mesell departed and founde sir Vwayne slepyng vppon

a bedde In a nothir chambir So she wente vnte sir

Vwayne and a waked hym and bade hym a ryse and

a wayte on my lady youre modir for she woll sle

Þe kynge youre fadir slepynge on his bedde for I go

to fecch his swerde well seyde sir Vwayne Go on your

way and lette me dele · Anone Þe damesell brought

Þe quene the swerde with quakyng hondis and lyghtly

she toke the swerde and pullyd hit oute and wente

boldely vnto Þe beddis syde and a wayted how and

where she myght sle hym beste And as she hevyd

vp Þe swerde to smyte sir · vwayne lepte vnto his

modir and cauȝt hir by the honde and seyde · A fende 

what wolt Þou do · And Þou were nat my modir with

this swerde I sholde smyte of thyne hede · A · seyde

sir Vwayne men seyde Þat Merlyon was be gotyn

of a fende but I may sey an erthely fende bare me

A· fayre son vwayne haue mercy vppon me I was

tempted with a fende where fore fore I cry Þe mercy

I woll neuer more do so and saue my worship & discouer

me nat · On this covenaunte seyde sir Vwayne I wol

for gyff you so ye woll neuer be a boute to do such dedis

Nay son and that I make you assuraunce

Than come tydynges vnto Morgan le fay Þat

Accolon was dede and his body brought

vnto the chirche And how Kyng Arthure

had his swerde a yen // But whan quene Morgan

wyste Þat Accolon was dede she was so sorowfull Þat

nye hir herte to braste · But by cause she wolde

 

f. 56v (IV.14)

 

nat hit were knowyn oute she kepte hir countenaunce

and made no sembelaunte of dole · But welle sche

wyste and she a bode tylle hir broÞer Arthure come

thydir Þer sholde no golde go for hir lyff // Than she

wente vnto Þe quene Gwenyvere and askid hir

leve to ryde In to hir contrey // ye may a byde

seyde Þe quene tyll youre broÞer Þe kynge com ho//

me // I may nat Madame seyde Morgan le fay for

I haue such hasty tydynges // well seyde the quene

ye may departe whan ye woll // So erely on Þe morne

or hit was day she toke hir horse and rode all Þat

day and moste party of Þe nyght and on the morne

by none she com to the same abbey of Nonnys whe//

re as lay kynge Arthure and she wyste nat that

he was there · And a none she asked were he was

and they answerde and seyde how he was leyde

hym on his bedde to slepe for he had but lytyll

reste this iij· nyghtes // well sedye she I charge

that none of you a wake hym tyll I do And than

she a lyght of hir horse & thought for to stele a

way Excaliber his swerde And she wente streyte

vnto his chambir and no man w durste disobey 

hir commaundement And there she found Arthur

a slepe on his bedde and Excalyber In his ryȝt

honde naked // Whan she sawe Þat she was passyng

havy Þat she myght nat com by the swere with oute

she had a waked hym and than she wyste welle

she had bene dede · So she toke the scawberde and

went hir way to horsebak // whan the kynge

a woke and myssid his scawberde he was wroth

and so he asked who had bne bene there and they

 

f. 57 (IV.14)

 

seyde his sister quene Morgan le fay had bene Þer and had

Put Þe scawberde undir hir mantell and is gone Alas seyde

Arthure falsly haue ye wacched me Sir seyde they all

we durst nat disobey your sistyrs commaundemente // A

seyde the Kynge lette fecch me Þe beste horse that may

be founde And bydde sir Outlake Arme hym In all hast

and take a nothir good horse & ryde with me · So a none

the Kynge and sir Outlake were well armyd and rode

aftir this lady And so they com be a crosse & founde a cow//

herde and they asked Þe pore man if Þer cam ony lady late

rydynge Þat way · Sir seyde this pore man ryght late com

a lady rydynge this way with a fourty horses And so they

folowed faste And with in a whyle Arthur had a syght of

Morgan le fay than he chaced as faste as he myght whan

she aspyed hym folowynge her she rode a grete pace tho//

row the foreste tyll she com to a playn And whan she sawe

she myght nat ascape she rode vnto a lake there by and

seyde what so euer com of me my brothir shall nat haue Þis

scawberde And than she lete throwe Þe scawberde In the

deppyst of the watir · So hit sanke for hit was hevy of

golde and precious stonys Than she rode In to a valey

where many grete stonys were · And whan she sawe she

muste be ouertake she shope hir self horse & man by enchaunte//

mente vnto gete marbyll stonys · And a none with all come 

Kynge Arthure and sir Outlake where as the Kynge

myght nat know his sistir and her men & one knyght

frome a noÞer // A seyde the Kynge here may ye se Þe ven//

geaunce of god And now am I sory this mysaventure is

be falle And than he loked for the scawberde but hit wold

nat be founde · So he turned to the abbey there she come

fro // So whan Arthure was gone they turned all there

 

f. 57v (IV.14-15)

 

lyknesse as she and they were be fore & seyde sirs now

may we go where we wyll // Than seyde Morgan le

fay saw ye of Arthure my broÞer yea seyde hir men and

that ye sholde haue founde and we me myght a stered

of one stede · for by his amyvestyall countenaunce wolde

haue caused vs to haue fledde I be leve you seyde the

quene // So anone after as she rode she mette a knyght

ledynge a noÞer knyght on horsebake be fore hym bounde

hande and foote blyndefelde to haue drowned hym In

a fowntayne · Whan she sawe this knyght so bounde she

asked what woll ye do with that knyght // lady seyde

he I woll drowne hym // For what cause she asked for

I founde hym with my wyff And she shall haue Þe same

deth a none // That were pyte seyde Morgan le fay

Now what sey ye knyght is hit trouÞe Þat he seyth of

you · Nay truly Madame he seyth nat ryght on me

Of whens be ye seyde Þe quene and of what contrey

I am of the courte of kynge Arthure and my name

is Manessen cosyn vnto Accolon of Gaule ye sey well

and for Þe love of hym ye shall be delyuerde and ye shal

haue youre aduersary In the same case Þat ye were In

So this Manessen was loused and the oÞer knght boun//

de // And anone Manessen vn armed hym & armede

hym self In his harneyse and so mounted on horsebak

and Þe knyght a fore hym and so threw hym In the

fountayne and so drowned hym and than he rode

vnto Morgan a yen and asked if she wolde ony thyng

vnto Arthure Telle hym seyde she that I rescewed

the nat for the love of hym but for Þe love of Acco//

lon and tell hym I feare hym nat whyle I can ma//

ke me and myne In lyknesse of stonys and lette hym

 

f. 58 (IV.15-16)

 

wete I can do much more whan I se my tyme · And so

she departed In to the contrey of Gore and Þer was she

rychely recyved and made hir castels & townys stron//

ge for all wey she drad muche kyng Arthure whan

Þe kynge had well rested hym at Þe abbey he rode vn

to Camelot and founde his quene and his barownes

ryght glad of his commyng · And whan they herde of

his stronge aduentrues as hit is be fore rehersed

they all had mervayle of Þe falshede of Morgan le fay

many knyghtes wysshed hir brente // Than come Ma//

nessen to courte and tolde Þe kynge of his adventure

// well seyde Þe kyng she is a kynde sister I shall so be

a vengid on hir and I lyve Þat all crystendom shall speke

of hit // So on the morne Þer cam a damesell on mes//

sage frome Morgan le fay to Þe kynge And she brouȝt

with hir Þe rycheste mantell Þat euer was sene In Þe courte

for hit was sette all full of precious stonys as one myȝt

stonde by a noÞer and Þer In were Þe rycheste stonys that

euer Þe kynge saw And Þe damesell seyde your sister sendyth

you this mantell and desyryth Þat ye sholde take this

gyfte of hir And what thynge she hath offended she wol

a mende hit at your owne plesure // whan Þe kyng be

helde this mantell hit pleased hym much he seyde

but lytyll // with that come damesell of Þe lake vnto

Þe kynge and seyde Sir I muste speke with you In prevyte

sey on seyde Þe kynge what ye woll // Sir seyde this

damesell putt nat vppon you this mantell tylle ye

haue sene more And In no wyse lat hit nat com on

you noÞer on no knyght of youres tyll ye commaunde Þe

brynger Þer of to putt hit vppon hir // well seyde the

kynge hit shall be as you counseyle me // And than

 

f. 58v (IV.16)

 

he seyde vnto the damesell Þat com frome his sister dame//

sell this mantell Þat ye haue brought me I woll se hit

vppon you · Sir she seyde hit woll nat be seme me to

were a kynges garmente // Be my hede seyde Arthure

ye shall were hit or hit com on my bak oÞer on ony man//

nys bak Þat here is // And so the kynge made to putt

hit vppon hir And forth with all she fell downe deede

and neuer spoke worde after and brente to colys // Than

was Þe kynge wondirly wroth more than he was to

fore hande And seyde vnto kynge Vryence my sistir

your wyff is all way a boute to be tray me and well

I wote oÞer ye or my nevewe your son is accounseyle

with hir to haue me distroyed · But as for you seyde Þe

kynge vnto kynge Vryence I deme nat gretly Þat ye

be of counseyle For Accolon confessed to me his owne

mowÞe Þat she wolde haue distroyed you as well as

me Þer fore y holde you excused But as for your son

Sir Vwayne I holde hym suspecte there fore I charge

you putt hym oute of my courte So sir Vwayne was

discharged · And whan sir Gawayne wyste Þat he made

hym redy to go with hym For who so banyshyth my co//

syn Jarmayne shall banyshe me So they too departed

& rode In to a grete foreste and so they com vnto an

abbey of monkys and Þer were well logged // Butt

whan Þe kynge wyste Þat sir Gawayne was departed

from Þe courte · There was made grete sorowe a

monge all Þe astatis // Now seyde Gaherys Gawaynes

broÞer we haue loste ·ij· good knyghtes for Þe love of one

So on the morne they herde Þer masses In Þe abbey & so

rode forth tyll they com to Þe grete foreste // Than

was sir Gawayne ware In a valey by a turrette  

 

f. 59 (IV.16-17)

 

xij· fayre damesels & ·ij· knyghtes armed on grete hor//

ses and Þe damesels wente to and fro by a tre · And

than was sir Gawayne ware how Þer hynge a whyȝt

shelde on that tre and euer as Þe damesels com by

hit they spette vppon hit and som threwe myre vppon

Þe shelde // Than sir Gawayne and sir Vwayne wente

and salewed them and asked why they dud that dispyte

to Þe shelde · Sir seyde Þe damsels we shall tell you//

There is a knyght In this contrey Þat owyth this

whyȝt shelde and he is a passyng good man of his hon//

dis but he hatyth all ladyes and Jantylwomen and Þer

fore we do all this dyspyte to that shelde // I shall sey

you seyde Sir Gawayne hit be semyth evyll a good

knyght to dispyse all ladyes and Jantyll women and

paraventure thouȝe he hate you he hath som cause and 

pav paraventure he lovyth In som oÞer placis ladyes and

& Jantyll women & ye be lovyd a gayne // And he be suche

a man of provesse as ye speke of now what is his name

Sir they seyde his name is sir Marhaus the kynges son of

Irelonde I knowe hym well seyde sir Vwayne he is a pass//

ynge good knyght as ony on lyve · for I sawe hym onys

preved at a Justys where many knyghtes were gadird

& Þat tyme Þer myght no man with stonde hym // A sayde sir

Gawayne damesels me thynke ye ar to blame for hit

is to suppose he Þat hyng Þat shelde Þat he woll nat be longe

Þer fro And than may tho knyghtes macche hym on horsebak

and Þat is more youre worshyp than thus to do · For I

woll a byde no lenger to se a knyghtes shelde so dishonou//

red · And Þer with sir Gawayne and sir Vwayne departed a

lytyll fro them And than ware they ware where sir

Marhaus com rydynge on a grete horse streyte toward

 

f. 59v (IV.17-19)

 

hem And whan Þe ·xij· damesels sawe sir Marhaus they

fledde to Þe turret as they were wylde Þat som of hem

felle by Þe way · Than Þat one of Þe knyghtes of Þe towre

dressed his shylde and seyde on hyȝe sir Marhaus defen//

de the and so they ran to gedyrs Þat the knyght brake

his spere on sir Marhaus but Marhaus smote hym so

harde pat he brake his necke and his horsebak // That

saw Þe er knyght of Þe turret & dressed hym to Marhaus

that so egerly they mette Þat this knyght of the turret

was smyte doune horse & man dede

AAnd than sir Marhaus rode vnto his shylde and

sawe how hit was defoyled and sayde of this dis//

pyte of parte I am a venged But yet for hir love

that gaff me this whyȝt shelde I shall were the and

hange mynge where Þat was · And so he honged hit a

boute his necke // Than he rode streyte vnto sir Ga//

wayne and to sir Vwayne And asked them what they

dud Þer they answerde hym and seyde they come frome

kynge Arthurs courte for to se aventures // welle

seyde sir Marhaus here am I redy an aduentures knyȝt

Þat woll fulfylle any aduenture Þat ye woll desyre // And

so departyd frome hem to fecche his raunge late hym go

seyde sir Vwayne vnto sir Gawayne For he is a passynge

good knyght as ony lyvynge · I wolde not be my wylle

Þat ony of vs were macched with hym Nay seyde sir Gaway//

ne nat so hit were shame to vs & he were nat assayed

were he neuer so good a knyght // welle seyde sir Vwayne

I woll assay hym be fore you for I am weyker than ye

And yff he smyte me downe than may ye revenge me

// So thes ·ij· knyghtes come to gedir with grete Raun//

dom Þat sir Vwayne smote sir Marhaus that his spere 

 

f. 60 (IV.19)

 

braste In pecis on the shelde And sir Marhaus smote hym

so sore Þat horse & man he bare to Þe erthe · And hurte sir

Vwayne on the lefte syde · Than sir Marhaus turned his

horse & rode thidir as he com fro & made hym redy with

his spere ·/ whan sir Gawayne saw Þat he dressed his

shelde and than they feautirde Þer sperys & they com

to gedyrs with all Þe myght of Þer horses Þat eyÞer knyght

smote oÞer so harde In myddis Þe sheldis But sir Gaway//

nes spere brake but sir Marhaus speare helde & Þer with

sir Gawayne and his horse russhed downe to the erthe

And lyghtly sir Gawayne wan on his feete & pulde

oute his swerde & dressed hym toward sir Marhaus on

foote And sir Marhaus saw Þat he pulde oute his swerde

& be gan to com to sir Gawayne on horsebak // Sir knyght

sayde sir Gawayne a lyght on foote or elles I woll sle

thyne horse // Gramercy sayde sir Marhaus of your Jentyl//

nesse ye teche me curtesy for hit is nat commendable

one knyght to be on horsebak and Þeer on foote // And Þer

with sir Marhaus sette his spere a gayne a tre & a lyght

and tyed his horse to a tre and dressed his shelde & eyÞer

com vnto oÞer egirly & smote to gedyrs with hir swerdys

Þat hir sheldis flew In cantellys and they bresed Þer helmys

& hawbirkes & woundid eyÞerer // But sir Gawayne fro

hit was ·ix· of Þe clok wexed euer strenger & strenger · for

by than  hit cam to the howre of noone he had ·iij· tymes

his myght encresed // And all this a spyed sir Marhaus

& had grete wondir how his myght encreced & so they

wounded eyÞerer passyng sore · So whan hit was toward

evynsonge sir Gawayns strength fyebled & woxe passyng

faynte Þat vnneÞe he myght dure no lenger // And sir Mar//

haus was than bygger & bygger · Sir knyght seyde sir

 

f. 60v (IV.19)

 

Marhaus I haue welle felt Þat ye ar a passynge goode

knyght a mervaylous man of myght as euer I felte

ony whyle hit lastyth and oure quarellys ar nat gete

and Þer fore hit were pyte to do you hurte for I fele ye

ar passynge fyeble // A seyde sir Gawayne Jantyll knyȝt

ye say Þe worde Þat I sholde sey & Þer with they toke of her helmys

and eyÞer kyssed oÞer and Þer they swore to gedyrs eythir to

love oÞer as brethirne · And Sir Marhaus prayde Sir

Gawayne to lodge with him Þat nyght · And so they toke Þer

horsis & rode towarde sir Marhaus maner & as they rode

by Þe way sir knyght seyde Sir Gawayne I haue mer//

vayle of you so valyaunte a man as ye be of provesse

Þat ye love no ladyes and damesels Sir seyde sir Marhaus

they name me wrongfully for hit be the damesels of Þe

turret Þat so name me and oÞer suche as they be // Now shal ·

I telle you for what cause I hate them · For they be sorsse//

res & Inchaunters many of them and be a knyght neuer

so good of his body & as full of provesse as a man may

be they woll make hym a starke cowerde to haue Þe

bettir of hym And this is the pryncipall cause Þat I

hate them and all good ladyes and Jantyll women I

owȝe them my seruyse as a knyght ought to do For as Þe  

booke rehersyth In freynsch Þer was this many knyghtes

Þat ouer macched sir Gawayne for all his thryse double myȝ//

te Þat he had Sir Launcelot de lake Sir Trystrams Sir

Bors de Gaynes Sir Percivale Sir Pelleas Sir Mar//

haus Thes ·vi· knyghtes had Þe bettir of sir Gawayne //

// Than with In a lytyll whyle they come to sir Marhaus

place was In a lytyll pryory and Þer they a lyght & ladyes

and damesels vnarmed them and hastely loked to Þer hurtes

for they were all ·iij· hurte and so they had good lodgyng

 

 

 

                                    Wyth Syr

f. 61 (IV.19)

 

with sir

Marhaus and good chere for whan he wyste Þat they

were kynge Arthurs syster sonnes · he made them all Þe

chere Þat lay In his power · And so they soiurned there a ·vij·

nyȝt & were well eased of Þer woundis And at Þe laste de//

parted // Nay sayde sir Marhaus we woll nat departe so

lyghtly for I woll brynge you thorow Þe foreste So they

rode forth all ·iij· And sir Marhaus toke with hym his gret//

tyste spere & so they rode thorow Þe foreste and rode day be

day well nye a vij· dayes or they founde ony Aventure So

at Þe laste they com In to a grete foreste Þat was named

Þe contrey & foreste of Arroy And Þecontrey is of stronge

adventures In this contrey seyde Marhaus cam nevir

knyght syn hit was crystynde but he founde strange ad//                   strange

ventures And so they rode & cam In to a depe valey full

of stonys and Þer by they sawe a fayre streme of watir a bo//

ven Þer by was Þe hede of Þe streme a fayre founteyne and

iij· damesels syttynge Þer by · And than they rode to them &

ayÞer salewed othir And Þe eldyst had a garlonde of golde

a boute her hede and she was ·iij· score wyntir of age or

more and hir heyre was whyght vndir Þe garlonde // Þe

secunde damesell was of ·xxxti· wyntir of age wyth a

Cerclet of golde a boute her hede // The thirde damesel ·

was but ·xv· yere of age and a garlonde of floures a

boute hir hede // Whan thes knyghtes had so be holde them

they asked hem Þe cause why they sate at Þe fountayne //

// We be here seyde Þe damesels For this cause if we may

se ony of Arraunte knyghtes to teche hem vnto stronge a

ventures and ye be ·iij· knyghtes adventures And we be

iij· damesels & Þer fore eche one of you muste chose one of

vs · And whan ye haue done so we woll lede you vnto ·iij

hyȝe wayes & there eche of you shall chose a way and his

 

f. 61v (IV.19-20)

 

damesell with hym and this day ·xij· moneth ye muste

mete here a gayne and god sende you Þe lyves & there

to ye muste plyght your trouth · this is well seyde seyde

Sir Marhaus / Now shall eueryche of vs chose a dame//

sell · I shall tell you seyde Sir Vwayne I am yongyst

& waykest of you bothe Þer fore lette me haue Þe eldyst

damesell for she hath sene much and can beste helpe

me whan I haue nede · For I haue moste nede of helpe

of you bothe // Now seyde Sir Marhaus I woll haue

Þe damesell of ·xxxti· wyntir age for she fallyth beste

to me // well seyde sir Gawayne I thanke you for ye

haue leffte me Þe yongyst and Þe fayryste & hir is me

moste levyste // Than euery damesell toke hir knyght

by Þe reygne of his brydyll and brought hem to the

iij· wayes & there was made promesse to mete at the

fountayne Þat day ·xij· monÞe and they were lyvynge

And so they kyssed & departed and euery kyght sette his lady

be hynde hym // And sir Vwayne toke Þe way that lay

weste · And sir Marhaus toke Þe way Þat lay sowÞe // And

sir Gawayne toke Þe way Þat lay northe // Now woll

we be gyn at sir Gwayne that helde Þat way tyll

Þat he com to a fayre maner where dwelled an olde

knyght and a good householder . And Þer sir Gawayne

asked Þe knyght if he knewe of any aventures // I

shall shewe you to morne seyde Þe knyght mervelos

adventures // So on the morne they rode all In same

to Þe foreste of a ventures tyll they com to a launde

and Þer by they founde a crosse & as they stood & hoved Þer

cam by them Þe fayreste knyght and Þe semelyest man

Þat euer they sawe · but he made Þe grettyst dole Þat euer man

made And than he was ware of sir Gawayne and 

 

f. 62 (IV.20-1)

 

salewed hym And prayde to god to sende hym muche

worshyp As for Þat sayde sir Gawayne gramercy · Also I

pray to god sende you honoure and worshyp · A sayde

Þe knyght I may lay Þat on syde for sorow & shame commyth

vnto me after worshyppe

And there wyth he passed vnto Þat one syde of Þe

lawnde And on Þater syde saw sir Gawayne ·x

knyghtes Þat hoved and made hem redy with hir

sheldis & with hir sperys a gaynste Þat one knyght that

cam by sir Gawayne // Than this one knyght feau//

tred a grete spere & one of Þe ·x knyghtes encountird

with hym · but this wofull knyght smote hym so harde

Þat he felle ouer his horse tayle // So this dolorous

knyght serued them all Þat at the leste way he smote

downe horse & man And all he ded with one spere · And

so whan they were all ·x· on foote they wente to the

one knyght and he stoode stone stylle & suffyrde hym

to pulle hym downe of his horse & bounde hym honde

& foote and tyed hym vndir Þe horse bely & so led hym

with hem · A Jhu seyde Sir Gawayne this is a dolefull

syght to se the yondir knyght so to be entreted And hit

semyth by Þe knyght Þat he sufferyth hem to bynde hym

so for he makyth no resistence // No seyde hoste Þat is

trouth · For & he wolde they all were to weyke for

hym · Sir seyde Þe damesell vnto sir Gawayne me se//

myth hit were your worshyp to help Þat dolerouse

knyght for me thynkes he is one of Þe beste knyghtes

Þat euer I sawe I wolde do for hym seyde sir Gawayne

but hit semyth he wolde haue no helpe · No seyde Þe

damesell me thynkes ye haue no lyste to helpe hym

// Thus as they talked they sawe a knyght on Þeer 

 

f. 62v (IV.21)

 

syde of Þe launde all armed save the hede // And on the

er syde Þer com a dwarff on horsebak all armed save Þe

hede with a grete mowÞe & a shorte nose // And whan Þe

dwarff com nyȝe he seyde where is this lady sholde

mete vs here · And Þer with all she com forth oute of the

woode And than they be gan to stryve for Þe lady for Þe

knyght seyde he wolde haue hir // woll we do welle

seyde the dwarff yondir is a knyght at Þe crosse lette hit

be putt vppon hym & as he demeth hit · so shall hit be

I woll well seyde Þe knyght And so they wente all ·iij·

vnto Sir Gawayne and tolde hym where fore they

strooff well sirres woll ye putt Þe mater In myne

honde · ye sir they seyde bothe // Now damesell seyde

sir Gawayne ye shall stonde be twyxte them bothe

and whethir ye lyste bettir to go to he shall haue you

// And whan she was sette be twene hem bothe she

lefte Þe knyght & went to Þe dwarff // And than the

dwarff toke hir vp and wente his way syngyng · And

Þe knyght wente his way with grete mournyng // Than

com there ·ij· knyghtes all armed & cryed on hyght sir

Gawayne knyght of Þe courte of kynge Arthure ma//

ke Þe redy In haste & Juste with me So they ran to gedirs

Þat eyÞer felle downe And than on foote they drew there

swerdis and dud full actually // The meane why//

le Þeer knyght went to the damesell · and asked hir

why she a bode with Þat knyght & seyde if ye wolde a byde

with me I wolde be your faythefull knyght And with you

woll I be seyde Þe damesell · For I may nat fynde In

my herte to be with hym for ryght now here was one

knyght Þat scomfyted ·x· knyghtes and at Þe laste he

was cowardly ledde a way · And Þer fore let vs ·ij·

 

f. 63 (IV.21-2)

 

go whyle they fyght // And Sir Gawayne fought

with Þat othir knyght longe but at Þe laste they accor//

ded bothe · And than Þe knyght prayde sir Gawayne

to lodge with hym Þat nyght So as sir Gawayne wente

with this knyght he seyde what knyght is he In this

contrey Þat smote downe the ·x· knyghtes · For whan

he had done so manfully he suffirde hem to bynde hym

hande & foote And so led hym a way · A sayde Þe knyȝt

Þat is Þe beste knyght I trow In the worlde & Þe moste

man of provesse And hit is Þe grettyst pyte of hym as

of ony knyght lyvynge for he hath be serued so as he

was this tyme more than ·x· tymes And his name

hyght sir Pelleas and he lovyth a grete lady In

this contrey And hir name is Ettarde And so whan

he loved hir Þer was cryded In this contrey a grete

Justis ·iij· dayes and all this knyghtes of this con//

trey were Þer & Jantyll women And who Þat preved hym

Þe beste knyght sholde haue a passyng good and a

Cerclet of golde and And pat Cerclet Þe knyght sholde

geff hit to Þe fayryste lady Þat was at Þat Justis · And

this knyght sir Pelleas was far Þe beste of ony Þat

was Þer And Þer were ·v C· knyghtes but Þer was nevir

man Þat euer sir Pelleas met but he stroke hym downe

er ellys frome his herse And euery day of ·iij· dayes

he strake downe ·xxti· knyghtes And Þer fore they gaff

hym Þe pryce And furÞe with all he wente Þer as the lady

Ettarde was & gaff her Þe Cerclet & seyde opynly

she was Þe fayreste lady Þat Þer was And Þat wolde

he preve vppon ony knyght Þat wolde sey nay // And

so he chose hir for his soueraygne lady & neuer to love

er but her · But she was so prowde Þat she had scorne

 

f. 63v (IV.22)

 

of hym and seyde she wolde neuer love hym thouȝe he

wolde dye for hir where fore all ladyes & Jantyll

women had scorne of hir Þat she was so prowde · For

Þer were fayrer than she And Þer was none Þat was Þer

but & sir Pelleas wolde haue profyrde hem love

they wolde haue shewed hym Þe same for his noble

provesse And so this knyght promysed Ettarde to folow

hir In to this contray and nevir to leve her tyll

she lovid hym And thus he is here Þe moste party

nyȝe her & logged by a pryory & euery weke she sen//

dis knyghtes to fyght with hym And whan he hath

putt hem to the worse than woll he suffir hem

wylfuly to take hym presonere be cas cause he

wolde haue a syght of this lady And all wayes she doth

hym grete dispyte for som tyme she makyth hir knyȝtes

to tye hym to his horse tayle and som tyme bynde hym

vndir Þe horse bealy · Thus In Þe moste shamfullyst

wyse Þat she can thynke he is brought to hir And all she

doth hit for to cause hym to leve this contrey & to

leve his lovynge · But all this can nat make hym

to leve for & he wolde a fought on fooote he myght

haue had Þe bettir of the ·x· knyghtes as well on foote

as on horsebak // Alas sayde sir Gawayne hit is grete

pyte of hym And aftir this nyght I woll seke hym to

morow In this foreste to do hym all Þe helpe I can // So

on Þe morow sir Gawayne toke his leve of his oste Sir

Carados and rode In to Þe foreste And at Þe laste he

mette with sir Pelleas makynge grete mone oute of

mesure so eche of hem salewed oÞer and asked hym why

he made suche sorow and as hit a bove rehersyth Sir

Pelleas tolde sir Gawayne But all wayes I suffir

 

f.64 (IV.22)

 

her knyghtes to fare so with me as ye sawe yestir day In truste

at Þe laste to wynne hir love for she knowith well all hir knyghtes

sholde nat lyghtly wynne me & me lyste to fyght with them

to Þe vttirmoste // where fore and I loved hir nat so sore I

had leuer dye an ·C· tymes · And I myght dye so ofte rathir

than I wolde suffir Þat dispyte but I truste she woll haue

pyte vppon me at Þe laste For love causyth many a good

knyght to suffir · to haue his entente but alas I am Infor//

tunate // And Þer with he made so grete dole Þat vnnethe he

myght holde hym on his horsebak // Now sayde Sir

Gawayne leve your mournynge And I shall promyse you by Þe

feyth of my body to do all Þat lyeth In my powere to gete

you Þe love of your lady and Þer to I woll plyȝte you my trouÞe

// A seyd sir Pelleas of what courte ar ye · Sir I am of Þe

courte of kynge Arthure and his sistir son And kynge Lotte

of Orkeney was my fadir & my name is sir Gawayne &

my name is sir Pelleas born In Þe Iles And of many Iles

I am lorde and neuer loved I lady noÞer damesel · tyll nowe

And sir knyght syn ye ar so nye Cosyn vnto kyng Arthure

and ar a kynges son there fore be tray me nat but help me

for I may nevir com by hir but by som good knyght for she

is In a stronge castell here faste by with In this ·iiij· myle

and ouer all this contrey she is lady off // And so I may neuer

com to hir presence but as I suffir hir knyghtes to take me And

but if I ded so Þat I myght haue a syght of hir I had bene dede

longe ar this tyme and yet fayre worde had I neuer none

of hir But whan I am brought to fore hir she rebukyth

me In Þe fowlyst maner And than they take me my horse and

harneyse and puttyth me oute of Þe yatis and she woll nat

suffir me to ete noÞer drynke and all wayes I offir me to be

her presoner // But Þat woll she nat suffir me · For I wolde desire

 

f. 64v (IV.22-3)

 

no more what paynes Þat euer I had so Þat I myght haue a

syght of hir dayly well seyde sir Gawayne all this shall

I amende and ye woll do as I shall devyse · I woll haue your

armoure and so woll I ryde vnto hir castell & tell hir that

I haue slayne you and so shall I come with In hir to cause

hir to cheryshe me And than shall I do my trew parte that

ye shall nat fayle to haue Þe love of hir and there

And there whan sir Gawayne plyght his trouthe

vnto sir Pelleas to be trew & feythfull vnto hym

so eche one plyght Þer trouÞe to oÞer and so they chonged

horse and harneyse And sir Gawayne departed & com to Þe castel·

where stood hir pauylyons with oute Þe ȝate // And as sone

as Ettarde had a spyed sir Gawayne she fledde In toward

the castell · But sir Gawayne spake on hyght and bade

hir a byde for he was nat sir Pelleas I am a noÞer knyȝt

Þat haue slayne sir Pelleas than do of your helme seyde Þe

lady Ettarde Þat I may se your vysage So whan she saw Þat

hit was nat sir Pelleas And he seyde yee // Than he tolde

hir his name was sir Gawayne of Þe courte of kynge

Arthure and his sistyrs son // And how he had slayne sir

Pelleas Truly seyde she Þat is grete pyte for he was

a passynge good knyght of his body · but of all men on lyve

I hated hym moste for I coude neuer be quytte of hym & for

ye haue slayne hym I shall be your woman and to do ony

thynge that may please you // So she made sir Gaway//

ne good chere Than sir Gawayne sayde Þat he loved a

lady and by no meane she wolde love hym Sche is to

blame seyde Ettarde and she woll nat love you for ye

Þat be so well borne a man & suche a man of provesse there

 

f. 65 (IV.23)

 

is no lady In this worlde to good for you // woll ye

seyde sir Gawayne promyse me to do what Þat ye may do

be the fayth of your body to gete me Þe love of my lady ·

yee sir Þat I promyse you be my fayth // Now seyde sir

Gawayne hit is your self Þat I love so well · there fore holde

your promyse ·  I may nat chese seyde Þe lady Ettarde but if I

sholde be for sworne And so she graunted hym to fulfylle

all his desyre // So hit was In the monthe of May that

she and sir Gawayne wente oute of Þe castell and sowped

In a Pauylyon and Þer was made a bedde · And there Sir

Gawayne and Ettarde wente to bedde to gedyrs · And In an

er Pavylyon she leyde hir damesels · And In the thirde pa//

vylyon she leyde parte of hir knyghtes · for than she had no

drede of sir Pelleas And Þer sir Gawayne lay with hir In Þe

Pavylyon ·ij· dayes and ·ij· nyghtes · And on the thirde day

on the morne erly sir Pelleas armed hym for he hadde

neuer slepte syn sir Gawayne promysed hym by Þe feythe

of his body to com to hym vnto his pavylyon by Þe pryo//

ry with In the space of a day and a nyght // Than Sir

Pelleas mounted vppon horse bak & com to the Pavyly//

ons Þat stood with oute Þe castell & founde in the fyrste pavy//

lyon ·iij· knyghtes In ·iij· beddis and ·iij· squyres lyggynge

at Þer feete // Than wente he to the secunde pavylyon &

founde ·iiij· Jantyll women lyggyng In ·iiij· beddis // And

than he yode to the thirde pavylyon And founde sir Gaway//

ne lyggyng In the bed with his lady Ettarde and eythir clyp//

pynge oÞer In armys // And whan he sawe that his hert

well nyȝe braste for sorow · And sayde alas Þat euer a knyȝt

sholde be founde so false · And than he toke his horse and

myght nat a byde no lenger for pure sorow // And whan

he had ryden nyȝe half a myle he turned a gayne & thouȝt

 

f. 65v (IV.23)

 

for to sle hem bothe // And whan he saw hem lye so bothe

slepynge faste Þat vnnethe · he myght holde hym on horse

bak for sorow & seyde thus to hym self · though this

knyght be neuer so false I woll neuer sle hym slepynge

for I woll neuer dystroy the hyȝe ordir of knyghthode &

Þer with he departed a gayne // And or he had rydden half a

myle he returned a gayne & thought than to sle hem

bothe makynge Þe grettyst sorow Þat euer man made · And

whan he come to Þe pavylyons he tyed his horse to a

tre And pulled oute his swerde naked In his honde &

wente to them there as they lay and yet he thought sha//

me to sle hem & leyde Þe naked swerde ouerthawrte bothe

Þer throtis & so toke his horse & rode his way . And whan

Sir Pelleas com to his pavylyons he tolde his knyghtes

& his squyers how he had spedde & seyde thus vnto them

For youre good & trew seruyse ye haue done me · I shall

gyff you all my goodes for I woll go vnto my bedde &

neuer a ryse tyll I be dede // And whan Þat I am dede I char//

ge you Þat ye take the herte oute of my body & bere hit

her be twyxte ·ij· syluer dysshes and telle her how I sawe

hir lye wyth Þat false knyght Sir Gawayne Ryght so sir

Pelleas vnarmed hym self and wente vnto his

bedde makyng merveylous dole & sorow // Than sir

Gawayne and Ettarde a woke of her slepe & founde

Þe naked swerde ouerthawrte Þer throtis // Than she knew

hit was Þe swerde of sir Pelleas Alas she seyde Sir

Gawayne ye haue be trayde sir Pelleas and me

But has he bene so vncurteyse vnto you as ye haue

bene to hym ye had bene a dede knyght but ye haue

dissayved me Þat all ladyes & damesels may be ware

be you and me And Þer with sir Gawayne made hym

 

f. 66 (IV.23)

 

redy and wente In to the foreste // So hit happed the

damesell of Þe lake Nynyve mette with a knyght of Sir

Pelleas that wente on his foote In this foreste ma//

kynge grete doole and she askede hym Þe cause · And

so the wofull knyght tolde her all how his mayster &

lorde was be trayed thorow a knyght & a lady & how

he woll neuer a ryse oute of his bedde tyll he be dede

Brynge me to hym seyde she anone & y woll wara//

unte his lyfe he shall nat dye for love · And she that

hath caused hym so to love she shall be In as evylle

plyte as he is or hit be longe to // For hit is no

Joy of suche a proude lady Þat woll nat haue no mercy

of suche a valyaunte knyght anone Þat knyght broute

hir vnto hym · And whan she sye hym lye on his bedde

she thought she sawe neuer so lykly a knyght // And Þer

with she threw an enchauntemente vppon hym & he fell

on slepe · And than she rode vnto Þe lady Ettarde and

charged Þat no man scholde a wake hym tyll she come

a gayne · So with In ·ij· owres she brought Þe lady Et//

tarde thidir and bothe Þe ladyes founde hym on slepe

// Loo seyde Þe damesell of Þe lake ye ouȝte to be a shamed

for to murÞer suche a knyght And Þer with she threw such

an Inchauntemente vppon hir Þat she loved hym so sore

that well nyȝe she was nere oute of hir mynde // A

lorde Jhu seyde this lady Ettarde how is hit be fallyn

vnto me Þat I love now Þat I haue hatyd moste of ony

man on lyve Þat is Þe ryghtevouse Jugemente of god

seyde Þe damesell // And than a none sir Pelleas a

waked and loked vppon ettarde and wha he saw hir

he knew her & than he hated hir more than ony woman

on lyve · And seyde a way traytoures & com neuer In my

 

f. 66v (IV.23-5)

 

syght · And whan she herde hym sey so she wepte and

made grete sorow oute of mynde // Sir knyght Pel//

leas seyde Þe damesel of Þe lake take your horse and com

forth with oute of this contrey & ye shall love a lady

Þat woll love you // I woll well seyde sir Pelleas

for this lady Ettarde hath done me grete dispyte

& shame And Þer he tolde hir Þe begynnyng & endyng

& how he had neuer purposed to haue rysen a gayne

tyll he had bene dede · And now suche grace god hath

sente me Þat I hate hir as much as I haue loved hir

// Thanke me Þer fore seyde Þe lady of Þe lake // Anone

Sir Pelleas armed hym & toke his horse & commaunded

his men to brynge aftir his pavylyons & his stuffe whyle

where Þe lady of Þe lake wolde assyngne them // So this

lady Ettarde dyed for sorow and Þe damesel· of the lake

reioysed sir Pelleas and loved to gedyrs duryng Þer lyfe

NOw turne we vnto sir Marhaute that rode with Þe

damesel· of ·xxxt· wynter of ayge Southwarde

And so they com In to a depe foreste and by fortune they

were nyghted and rode longe In a depe way And at the

laste they com vnto a courtlage & there they asked herbo//

row · But Þe man of Þe courtlage wolde nat logge them

for no tretyse Þat they coude trete // But this much the

good man seyde and ye woll take Þe aduenture of youre

herbourage I shall bryng you Þer ye may be herbourde what

aventure is Þat I shall haue for my herborow seyde Sir

Marhaute ye shall wete whan ye com Þer seyde Þe good man

Sir what aduenture so hit be I pray the to brynge me

thidir · for I am wery my damesel· & my horse both // So

Þe good man wente vppon his gate be fore hym In a lane

And with in an houre he brought hym vntyll a fayre castel·

 

f. 67 (IV.25)

 

And than Þe pore man called Þe porter and anone he was

lette In to Þe castell & so he tolde Þe lorde how he had brouȝt

hym a knyght arraunte and a damesell wolde be lodged

with hym // Lette hym In seyde Þe lorde · For hit may happen

he shall repente Þat they toke theire herborow here · So sir

Marhaute was let In with a torche lyght & there was a gete

syght of goodly men Þat welcomed hym // And than his

horse was lad In to a stable and he & Þe damesel · were

brought In to Þe halle & there stoode a myghty duke and

many goodly men a boute hym // Than this duke asked

hym what he hyght & fro whens he com & with whom he

dwelte // Sir he seyde I am a knyght of kynge Arthurs

and knyght of Þe table rounde & my name is sir Mar//

haute and borne I was in Irelonde That me repentes

seyde Þe duke for I love nat thy lorde noÞer none of thy felo//

wys of Þe table roundeAnd there fore ease thy self this

nyght as well as Þou mayste · For as to morne I and my

vi· sonnes shall macch with you // Is Þer no remedy seyde sir

Marhaute but Þat I muste haue a do with you & your ·vi· sunnes

at onys // No seyde Þe duke for this cause I made myne

a vowe . For sir Gawayne slew my sevynth sonne sonne

In a recountre Þer fore I made myne a vow Þat Þer sholde

neuer knyght of knyge Arthurs courte lodge with me or

com Þer as I myght haue a do with hym but I wolde reven//

ge me of my sonnes deth · what is your name sayde sir

Marhaute I requyre you telle me & hit please you //

// Wete Þou well I am Þe duke of Southe marchis // A sey//

de sir Marhaute I haue herde seyde Þat ye haue bene longe

tyme a grete foo vnto my lorde Arthure and vnto his

knyghtes · That shall ye fele to morne seyde Þe duke and

ye leve so longe // Shall I haue a do with you seyde Sir

 

f. 67v (IV.25-6)

 

Marhaute ye seyde Þe duke Þer of shalt Þou not chose And

Þer fore let take hym to his chambir and lette hym haue

all Þat tyll hym longis // So sir Marhaute departed & was

led vnto his chambir and his damesel· was led In tyll hir

chambir · And on Þe morne Þe duke sente vnto sir Marhaute

and bade hym make hym redy // And so sir Marhaute a

rose & armed hym and than Þer was a masse songe a fore hym

& brake his faste & so mounted on horse bak In Þe courte of

of Þe castell Þer they sholde do batayle · So Þer was Þe deuke all

redy on horsebak & clene armed and his ·vi· sonnys by hym

& eueryche had a spere In his honde & so they encountirde

where as the deuke & his sonnys brake her sperys vppon hym

// But sir Marhaute hylde vp his spere & touched none

of hem // Than come Þe ·iiij· sonnes by couple and ·ij· of

them brake Þer sperys and so dud Þeer ·ij· And all this whyle

sir Marhaute towched hem nat // Than sir Marhaute ran

to Þe deuke & smote hym downe with his speare that horse

& man felle to Þe erthe & so he served his sonnes // Than

sir Marhaute a lyght downe & bade Þe deuke yelde hym

other he wolde sle hym // Than som of his sonnes reco//

virde & wolde haue sette vppon sir Marhaute Than sir

Marhaute seyde sir deuke Cese thy sonnys & ellys I woll

do Þe vttirmust to you all // Than Þe deuke sye he myȝt

nat ascape Þe deth he cryed to his sonnes & charged them

to yelde them to sir Marhaute And than they kneled alle a

downe & putt Þe pomels of Þer swerdis to the knyght and

& so he receyvid them And than they hove vp Þer fadir on

his feete // And so by Þer comunal· assent promysed to Sir

Marhaute neuer to be fooys vnto kynge Arthure And Þer vppon

at Whytsonday next aftir to com he and his sonnes And

Þer to putt them In Þe kynges grace // Than sir Marhaute

 

f. 68 (IV.26)

 

departed & with In ·ij· dayes sir Marhautes damesel· brought hym

where as was a grete turnemente Þat the lady Vawse had

cryed and who Þat dud beste sholde haue a ryche Cerclet of

golde worth a M Besauntis and Þer sir Marhaute dud so

nobely that he was renouned & had smeten doune ·xl·

knyghtes & so Þe Cerclet of golde was rewarded hym

// Than he departed thens with grete honoure And so with

In ·xij· nyght his damesel brought hym to an erlys pla//

ce his name was Þe erle Fergus That aftir was sir

Trystrams knyght · And this erle was but a yonge

man & late com to his londis · And Þer was a gyaunte faste

by hym Þat hyght Taulurd And he had an oÞer broÞer In Cor//

unayle that hyght Taulas that sir Trystram slewe

whan he was oute of his mynde // So this erle made

his complaynte vnto sir Marhaute that Þer was a gyaunte

by hym Þat destroyed all his londis & how he durste no

where ryde noÞer go for hym Sir seyde he wheÞer vsyth

he to fyght on horsebak othir on foote // Nay seyde the

erle Þer may no horse bere hym // well seyde sir Marhau//

te than woll I fyght with hym on foote // So on Þe mor//

ne sir Marhaute prayde Þe erle Þat one of his men myȝt

brynge hym where Þe gyaunte was And so one brouȝt

hym where he syȝe hym sytte vndir a tre of hooly and

many clubbis of Ironne and Gysernes a boute hym

So this knyght dressed hym to Þe gyaunte & put his

shylde be fore hym . And Þe gyaunte & put his

club · In his honde  at Þe fyrste stroke he clave Syr

Marhautis shelde and Þer he was In grete perell · For Þe

gyaunte was a sly fyghter · But at Þe laste sir Mar//

haute smote of his ryght arme a boven Þe elbow // Þan

Þe gyaunte fledde & Þe knyght affter hym & so he drove

 

f. 68v (IV.26-7)

 

hym In to a watir · but Þe gyaunte was so hyȝe that he

myght nat wade aftir hym · And than sir Marhaute ma//

de the erle Fergus man to fecche hym stonys // And

with Þat stonys Þe knyght gave Þe gyaunte many sore stro//

kis tylle at Þe laste he made hym falle downe In

Þe watir And so was he there dede ·// Than sir Marhal//

te wente in to Þe gyauntes castell · And Þer he delyuerde 

xxiiij knyghtes oute of Þe gyauntespreson and xij lady//

es & Þer he had grete rychesse oute of numbir Þat dayes

of his lyff he was nevir poore man // Than he re//

turned to Þe erle Fergus the whyche thanked hym

gretly & wolde haue yevyn hym half his londys

but he wolde none take // So sir Marhaute dwellid

with Þe erle nye half a yere · for he was sore brused

with Þe gyaunte // So at Þe laste he toke his leve and

as he rode by the way with his damysel· he mette with

sir Gawayne and wyth sir Vwayne so by adven//

ture he mette with iiij· knyghtes of Arthurs courte

The fyrst was sir Sagramour le desyrus Sir Oȝ·

anna le cure hardy Sir Dodynas le saveage And

sir Felotte of lystynoyse And there sir Marhaute with

one spere smote downe these iiij knyghtes and hurte

them sore And so departed to mete at his day

NOw turne we vnto sir Vwayne that rode

Westwarde with his damesell of ·iij score wyn//

tir of ayge and there was a turnemente nyȝe the 

marche of Walys And at Þat turnemente sir Vwayne

smote doune ·xxxt knyghtes Þer fore was gyffyn hym

Þe pryce And that was a Jarfaucon And a whyght

stede trapped with cloth of golde // So than sir Vwayne

ded many strange adventures by the meanys of Þe

 

 

 

                              Olde damesel·

f. 69 (IV.27)

olde damesel·

And so she brought to a lady Þat was called Þe lady of Þe roch

the whyche was curtayse // So Þer was In Þat contrey ·ij·

knyghtes Þat were brethirne And they were called ·ij· pere//

lous knyghtes · That one hyght sir Edwarde of the rede

castell And Þater sir Hew of Þe rede castell · And these ·ij

brethirne had disheryted Þe lady of Þe Roche of a Baron//

nery of londis by Þer extorsion ·/ And as this knyghte

was lodged with this lady she made hir complaynte to

hym of thes ·ij· knyghtes Madam seyde sir Vwayne they

ar to blame for they do a yenste Þe hyȝe order of knyght//

hode and Þe oth Þat they made And if hit lyke you I woll

speke with hem be cause I am a knyght of kyng Arthurs

and to entrete them with fayrenesse / & if they woll nat

I shall do batayle with hem for goddis sake and In Þe de//

fence of your ryght // Gramercy seyde Þe lady & Þer as

I may nat acquyte you god shall /// So on Þe morne

Þe ·ij knyghtes were sente fore Þat they sholde speke with

Þe lady of Þe Roche And wete you well they fayled

nat · for they com with an C· horses · But whan this

lady sawe them In suche maner so bygge she wolde

nat suffir sir ·Vwayne to go oute to them vppon no

surete ne of fayre langage · but she made hym to

speke with them ouer a toure // But fynally thes ·ij·

brethirne wolde nat be entreted and answerde

Þat they wolde kepe Þat they had // Well seyde Syr

Vwayne than woll I fyght with one of you and preve

Þat ye do this lady wronge // That woll we nat

seyde they for & we do batayle we ·ij· woll fyght

bothe at onys with one knyght · And Þer fore yf ye

lyste to fyght so we woll be redy at what oure

ye woll assygne // And yf ye wynne vs In batayle

 

f. 69v (IV.27-8)

 

she to haue hir londis a gayne // ye say well sey//

de sir Vwayne There fore make you redy & Þat ye

be here to morne In Þe defence of this ladyes ryȝt

// So was Þer sykernesse made on bothe partyes Þat no

treson sholde be wrought · And so Þes knyghtes departed

& made them redy · And Þat nyght sir Vwayne had gete

chere & on Þe morne he a rose erly & harde masse and

brake his faste & so rode In to Þe playne with oute Þe ga//

tis where hoved Þe ·ij· brethirne a bydyng hym // So

they ran to gedyrs passyng sore Þat sir Edwarde & sir

Hew brake Þer sperys vppon sir Vwayne And sir Vwayne

smote sir Edwarde that he felle ouer his horse and yette

his spere braste nat // And than he spurred his horse

And com vppon sir Hew And ouer threw hym · But they

sone recouerde and dressed Þer shyldes & drew oute Þer swerdes

& bade sir vwayne a lyȝt & do his batayle to Þe vtteraunce

Than sir vwayne devoyded his horse delyuerly & put his

shylde be fore hym & drew his swerde and so they threste

to gedyrs and eythir gave oÞer grete strokis · And there Þes

ij· brethirne wounded sir vwayne passyng grevously Þat Þe

lady of Þe roche wente he sholde haue deyed // And thus they

fought to gedyrs ·v· oures as men outraged of of reson

And at Þe laste sir vwayne smote sir Edwarde vppon the

helme suche a stroke Þat his swerde kerved vnto his canell

bone · And than sir Hew a bated his corrage · But sir vwayne

presed faste to haue slayne hym // That saw sir Hew and

kneled a downe & yelded hym to sir v vwyane And he of his

Jantylnesse resceyved his swerde & toke hym by Þe honde &

wente In to the castell to gedirs // Than this lady of Þe

Roche was passyng glad And sir Hew made grete sorow

for his brothirs deth · But this lady was restored a yen

 

f. 70 (IV.28-9)

 

of all hir londis · And sir Hew was commaunded to be at the

courte of kynge Arthure at Þe next feste of Pentecoste

// So Sir vwayne dwelled with this lady nyȝe halfe a yere

for hit was longe or he myght be hole of his grete hurtis

And so whan hit drew nyȝe Þe terme day Þat sir Gawayne sir

Marhaute and sir Vwayne made to mete at Þe crosse way

Than euery knyght drew hym thydir to holde his promyse Þat

they made · And Sir Marhalte and sir vwayne brought Þer

damesels with hem – But sir Gawayne had loste his damesel·

Ryght so at Þe ·xij· monthis ende they mette all ·iij·

knyghtes at Þe fountayne and theire damesels· But

the damesell Þat sir Gawayne had coude sey but lytyll wor//

shyp of hym // So they departed frome Þe damesels and rode

thorowe a grete foreste & there they mette with a messynge//

re Þat com from kynge Arthurs courte Þat had sought hem

well nyȝe a ·xij· monthe · thorow oute all Ingelonde Walis

& Scotlonde and charged yf euer he myght fynde sir Gawayne

and sir vwayne to haste hem vnto the courte agayne · And

than were they all glad // And so they prayde sir Marhaute

to ryde with hem to Þe kynges courte // And so with In xij· dayes

they come to Camelot And Þe kynge was passyng glad of

Þer commyng and so was all Þe courte // Than Þe kynge made

hem to swere vppon a booke to telle hym all Þer adventures

Þat had be falle them Þat ·xij· monthe be fore & so they ded · And

Þer was sir Marhaute was well knowyn · for Þer were knyghtes

Þat he had macched a fore tyme And he was named one of Þe

beste knyghtes lyvyng // So a gayne Þe feste of Pentecoste

cam Þe damesell of Þe Laake & brought with hir sir Pelleas

// And at Þat hyȝe feste of Þer was grete Joustys of all knyȝtes

Þat were at that Justis Sir Pelleas had Þe pryce and Syr

Marhaute was named next But sir Pelleas was so

 

f. 70v (IV.29)

 

stronge Þat Þer myght but fewe knyghtes stonde hym a buffette with

a spere // And at Þe next feste sir Pelleas and sir Marhalt

were made knyghtes of Þe rounde table · For Þer were ·ij· Segis

voyde for ·ij· knyghtes were slayne Þat ·xij· monÞe · and grete

Joy had kynge Arthure of sir Pelleas and of sir Marhal//

te But Pelleas loved neuer aftir sir Gawayne But as

he spared hym for Þe love of Þe kynge but oftyn tymes at

Justis & at turnementes Sir Pelleas quytte sir Gawayne

for so hit rehersyth In the booke of Frensh · So sir Trys//

trams many dayes aftir fought with sir Marhaute In an

Ilande And Þer they dud a grete batayle · But Þe laste sir

Trystrams slew hym · So Sir Trystrams was so wonn//

ded Þat vnnetthe he myght recouer and lay at a Nunrye

half a yere // And sir Pelleas was a worshypfull

knyght And was one of Þe ·iiij· Þat encheved Þe Sankgreal·

And Þe damesel· of Þe Laake made by her meanes that neuer

he had a do with sir Launcelot de Laake For where sir Launce//

lot was at ony Justis or at ony turnemente · she wolde

not suffir hym to be Þer that day but yf hit were on Þe syde

of Sir Launcelot here endyth this tale as Þe Freynshe ·

booke seyth fro the maryage of kynge Vther vnto kyng

Arthure that regned aftir hym & ded many batayles

// And this booke endyth were as sir Launcelot And

Sir Trystrams com to courte · who that woll make

ony more lette hym seke oÞer bookis of kynge Arthure

or of Sir Launcelot or Sir Trystrams For this was

drawyn by a knyght presoner Sir Thomas Malleorre

that god sende hym good recouer Amen & ces

 

                                Explicit

¶ Capitulū Primū

SOo after these questys of Syr Gawyne / Syre Tor / and kynge Pellinore / It felle so that Merlyn felle in a dottage on the damoisel that kyng Pellinore broughte to the Courte / and she was one of the damoysels of the lake that hyȝte Nyneue / But Merlyn wold lete haue her no rest but alweyes he wold be with her / And euer she maade Merlyn good chere tyl she had lerned of hym al maner thynge that she desyred and he was assoted vpon her that he myghte not be from her / Soo on a tyme he told kynge Arthur that he sholde not dure longe but for al his craftes he shold be put in the erthe quyck and Page  119 [leaf 60r] so he told the kynge many thynges that shold befalle / but alle wayes he warned the kynge to kepe wel his swerd and the scaubard / for he told hym how the swerd and the scaubard shold be stolen by a woman from hym that he most trusted / Also he told kynge Arthur that he shold mysse hym / yet had ye leuer than al your landes to haue me ageyne / A sayd the kynge / syn ye knowe of your aduenture puruey for hit / and put awey by your craftes that mysauenture / Nay said Merlyn it wylle not be / soo he departed from the kynge / And within a whyle the damoysel of the lake departed / and Merlyn wente with her euermore where some euer she wente / And oftymes merlyn wold haue had her pryuely awey by his subtyle craftes / thenne she made hym to swere that he shold neuer do none enchauntement vpon her yf he wold haue his wylle / And so he sware / so she and Merlyn wente ouer the see vnto the land of Benwyck there as kynge Ban was kynge that had grete warre ageynst kynge Claudas / and there Merlyn spake with kynge Bans wyf a fair lady and a good / and her name was Elayne / and there he sawe yonge Launcelot / there the quene made grete sorowe for the mortal werre þt kyng claudas made on her lord and on her landes / Take none heuynesse said Merlyn / for this same child within this xx yere shall reuenge yow on kynge Claudas that all Crystendom shalle speke of it And this same child shalle be the moost man of worship of the world / and his fyrst name is galahad / that knowe I wel said Merlyn / And syn ye haue confermed hym Launcelot / that is trouthe said the quene / his fyrst name was Galahad / O Merlyn said the quene shalle I lyue to see my sone suche a man of prowesse / ye lady on my parel ye shal see hit / and lyue many wynters after / And soo sone after the lady and Merlyn departed / and by the waye Merlyn shewed her many wondres / and cam in to Cornewaille / And alweyes Merlyn lay aboute the lady to haue her maydenhode / and she was euer passynge wery of hym / and fayne wold haue ben delyuerd of hym / for she was aferd of hym by cause he was a deuyls sone / and she coude not beskyfte hym by no meane /

¶ And soo on a tyme it happed that Merlyn shewed to her in a roche where as was a greete wonder / and wroughte by Page  120 [leaf 60v] enchauntement that wente vnder a grete stone / So by her subtyle wyrchynge she maade Merlyn to goo vnder that stone to lete her wete of the merueilles there / but she wroughte so ther for hym that he came neuer oute for alle the crafte he coude doo / And so she departed and lefte Merlyn /

¶ Capitulum Secundum

ANd as kynge Arthur rode to Camelot / and helde ther a grete feest with myrthe and Ioye / so soone after he retorned vnto Cardoylle / and ther cam vnto Arthur newe tydynges that the kynge of Denmarke and the kynge of Ireland that was his broder and the kynge of the vale and the kynge of Soleyse / and the kynge of the yle of Longtaynse al these fyue kynges with a grete hoost were entrid in to the lād of kynge Arthur and brente and slewe clene afore hem / both Cytees and castels that it was pyte to here /

¶ Allas sayd Arthur yet had I neuer reste one monethe syn I was crowned kyng of this land / Now shalle I neuer reste tyl I mete with tho kynges in a fayre feld / that I make myn auowe for my true lyege peple shalle not be destroyed in my defaulte / goo with me who wille and abyde who that wylle / thenne the kynge lete wryte vnto kynge Pellenore and prayd hym in alle haste to make hym redy with suche peple as he myght lyȝtlyest rere and hye hym after in al hast / All the Barons were pryuely wrothe / that the kynge wold departe so sodenly but the kynge by no meane wold abyde / but made wrytynge vnto them that were not there / and bad them hye after hym suche as were not at that tyme in the Courte / Thenne the kynge came to quene gweneuer and sayd lady make yow redy / for ye shall goo with me / for I may not longe mysse yow / ye shal cause me to be the more hardy / what auenture so befalle me / I wille not wete my lady to be in no ieopardy / Sire said she I am at your commaundement / and shalle be redy what tyme so ye be redy / So on the morne the kynge and the quene departed with suche felauship as they hadde / and came in to the Northe in to a forest besyde humber and there lodged hem

¶ Whanne the word & tydynge came vnto the fyue kynges Page  121 [leaf 61r] aboue sayd that Arthur was besyde humber in a foreste there was a knyght broder vnto one of the fyue kynges that gafe hem this counceille / ye knowe wel that syre Arthur hath the floure of Chyualrye of the world with hym as it is preued by the grete bataille he dyd with the xj kynges / And therfor hye vnto hym nyghte and daye tyl that we be nyghe hym / for the lenger he taryeth the bygger he is / and we euer the waiker And he is so couragyous of hym self that he is come to the felde with lytel peple / And therfore lete vs set vpon hym or day and we shalle slee doune of his knyghtes ther shal none escape

¶ Capitulum Tercium

UN to this counceille these fyue kynges assented / and so they passed forth with her hoost thorow Northwalis and came vpon Arthur by nyghte and sett vpon his hoost as the kynge and his knyghtes were in their pauelions kynge Arthur was vnarmed / and had leid hym to rest with hys quene Gweneuer / Sir said syr kaynus it is not good we be vnarmed /we shalle haue no nede said syre Gawayne and Syr Gryflet that laye in a lytel pauelione by the kynge / With that they herd a grete noyse and many cryed treson treson / Allas said kynge Arthur we ben bitrayed / Vnto armes felawes thenne he cryed / so they were armed anone at al poyntes / Thenne cam ther a wounded knyghte vnto the kynge & saide syr saue your self and my lady the quene for our hooste is destroyed and moche peple of ours slayne / Soo anone the kynge and the quene and the thre knyghtes took her horses & rode toward humber to passe ouer it / and the water was so rough that they were aferd to passe ouer / Now may ye chese sayd kynge Arthur whether ye wille abyde and take the aduentur on this syde / for and ye be taken / they wille slee yow / It were me leuer sayd the quene to dye in the water than to falle in your enemyes handes & there be slayne / And as they stode soo talkyng / syr kaynus sawe the fyue kynges comynge on horsbak by hem self alone with her speres in her handes euen toward hem / loo said syr kaynus yonder be the fyue kynges / lete vs go to them and matche hem / that were foly sayd sire gawayne / for we are but thre and they ben fyue that is trouthe said syre Gryflet / No force said syr kay I wille vndertake for two of Page  122 [leaf 61v] them / and thenne may ye thre vndertake for the other thre / and ther with al syr kay lete his hors renne as fast as he myghte and strake one of them thorow the shelde / and the body a fadom that the kynge felle to the erthe stark dede / That sawe syr Gawayne and ranne vnto another kyng so hard that he smote hym thurgh the body / And ther with all kyng Arthur ran to another / and smote hym thurgh the body with a spere that he fylle to the erthe dede / Thenne syr Gryflet ranne vnto the iiij kyng and gaf hym suche a falle that his neck brake / Anone syr kay ranne vnto the fyfthe kynge and smote hym so hard on the helme that the stroke clafe the helme and the hede to the erthe / that was wel stryken sayd kynge Arthur / and worshipfully hast thow hold thy promesse / therfor I shal honoure the / whyle that I lyue / and ther with all they set the quene in a barge in to humber / but alweyes quene gweneuer praysed syr kay for his dedes / and sayd what lady that ye loue / and she loue yow not ageyne she were gretely to blame / and amonge ladyes said the Quene I shalle bere youre noble fame / for ye spak a grete word and fulfylled it worshipfully and therwith the quene departed / Thenne the kyng and the thre knyghtes rode in to the forest / for there they supposed to here of them that were escaped / and there he fond the most party of his peple / and told hem all how the fyue kynges were dede / and therfore lete vs hold vs to gyders tyll it be day / and whan their hoost have aspyed that their chyuetayns be slayn they wille make suche dole that they shalle not mowe helpe hem self / and ryght so as the kynge said / so it was / for whan they fonde the fyue kynges dede / they made suche dole that they fell fro their horses / Ther with all cam kyng Arthur but with a fewe peple and slewe on the lyfte hand and on the ryght hand that wel nyhe ther escaped no man / but alle were slayne to the nombre of xxx M / And whan the bataille was all ended the kynge kneled doune and thanked god mekely / and thenne he sente for the quene and soone she was come / and she maade grete Ioye of the ouercomynge of that bataille

¶ Capitulum iiij

Page  123 [leaf 62r]

THere with alle came one to kynge Arthur / and told hym that kyng Pellinore was within thre myle with a grete hoost / and he said / go vnto hym and lete hym vnderstande how we haue spedde / Soo within a whyle kynge Pellinore cam with a grete hoost / and salewed the peple and the kyng / and ther was grete ioye made on euery syde / Thenne the kyng lete serche how moche people of his party ther was slayne / And ther were founde but lytel past two honderd men slayne and viij knyȝtes of the table round in their pauelions Thenne the kynge lete rere and deuyse in the same place there as the batail was done a faire abbeye and endowed it wyth grete lyuelode and lete it calle the Abbey of la beale aduenture / but whanne somme of them cam in to their Countreyes ther of the fyue kynges were kynges and told hem how they were slayne / ther was made grete dole / And alle kynge Arthurs enemyes as the kynge of Northwales and the kynges of the North wyste of the bataille they were passynge heuy / and soo the kynge retorned vnto Camelot in hast / And whan he was come to Camelot / he called kynge Pellinore vnto hym & sayd ye vnderstand wel that we haue loste viij knyghtes of the best of the table round / and by your aduys we wille chese viij ageyne of the best we may fynde in this Courte / Syr said Pellinore / I shal counceille yow after my conceyte the best / there are in your Courte ful noble knyghtes bothe of old & yonge And therfor by myn aduys ye shal chese half of the old and half of the yonge / whiche be the old said kyng Arthur / Syre said kynge Pellinore me semeth that kynge Vryence that hath wedded your syster Morgan le fay and the kynge of the lake and syr Heruyse de reuel a noble knyght / and syr galagars the iiij / this is wel deuysed said kyng Arthur and right soo shal it be / Now whiche are the four yong knyȝtes said Arthur Syre saide Pellinore the fyrst is syr Gawayne your neuewe that is as good a knyght of his tyme / as ony is in this lād And the second as me semeth best is syre Gryflet le fyse the dene that is a good knyght and ful desyrous in armes / and who may see hym lyue he shal preue a good knyghte / And the thyrd as me semeth is wel to be one of the knyghtes of the round table syr kay the [ senescha ] for many tymes he hath done Page  124 [leaf 62v] ful worshipfully / And now at your last bataille he dyd full honourably for to vndertake to slee two kynges / By my hede said Arthur he is best worthy to be a knyght of the rounde table of ony that ye haue reherced / and he had done no more prowesse in his lyf dayes

¶ Capitulum Quintum

NOw said kynge Pellenore I shalle putte to yow two knyghtes / and ye shalle chese whiche is moost worthy / that is Syr Bagdemagus and syr Tor my sone / But by cause Syre Tor is my sone I may not prayse hym / but els and he were not my sone / I durst saye that of his age ther is not in this land a better knyghte than he is nor of better condycions and lothe to doo ony wronge / and loth to take ony wronge / By my hede said Arthur he is a passyng good knyght / as ony ye spak of this day that wote I wel said the kyng / for I haue sene hym preued but he seyth lytyll and he doth moche more / for I knowe none in al this courte & he were as wel borne on his moder syde as he is on your syde that is lyke hym of prowesse and of myghte / And therfor I wille haue hym at this tyme and leue syr Bagdemagus tyll another tyme / Soo whan they were so chosen by the assente of alle the barons / Soo were there founden in her syeges euery knyghtes names that here are reherced / and so were they set in their syeges / wherof syr Bagdemagus was wonderly wrothe that syr Tor was auaunced afore hym / and therfore sodenly he departed from the Courte and toke his squyer with hym / & rode longe in a forest tyll they came to a crosse and there alyȝt and sayd his prayers deuoutely / The meane whyle his squyer founde wryten vpon the crosse that Bagdemagus shold neuer retorne vnto the Courte ageyne / tyll he had wonne a knyȝtes body of the round table body for body / lo syr said his squyer / here I fynde wrytyng of yow / therfor I rede yow retorne ageyne to the Courte / that shalle I neuer said Bagdemagus by men speke of me grete worship / and that I be worthy to be a knyghte of the round table / and soo he rode forthe / And ther by the way he founde a braūche of an holy herbe that was the sygne of the Sancgraill / and no knyght founde suche tokens but he were a good lyuer / So as sir Bagdemagus rode Page  125 [leaf 63r] to see many aduentures / it happed hym to come to the roche / ther as the lady of the lake had put Merlyn vnder the stone / and there he herde hym make grete dole / wherof syre Bagdemagus wold haue holpen hym and wente vnto the grete stone / and he was so heuy that an C men myght not lyfte hyt vp / whan Merlyn wyste he was there he bad leue his labour / for al was in vayne / for he myght neuer be holpen but by her that put hym ther / and so Bagdemagus departed and dyd many auentures and preued after a full good knyght / and came ageyne to the Courte and was made knyght of the round table / So on the morne ther felle newe tydynges and other auentures

¶ Capitulum Sextum

THenne it befelle that Arthur and many of his knyghtes rode on huntynge in to a grete forest / and it happed kyng Arthur / kynge Vryens and syr Accolon of gaulle folowed a grete herte for they thre were wel horsed / and soo they chaced so fast that within a whyle they thre were thenne x myle from her felauship / And at the last they chaced so sore that they slewe theyr horses vndernethe them / thenne were they al thre on foote / and euer they sawe the herte afore them passynge wery and enbusshed / What wille we doo said kyng arthur we are hard bestad / lete vs goo on foote said kyng Vryens tyl we may mete with some lodgynge / Thenne were they ware of the herte that lay on a grete water banke / and a brachet bytynge on his throte and mo other houndes cam after / Thenne kynge Arthur blewe the pryse and dyghte the herte / Thenne the kynge loked aboute the world / and sawe afore hym in a grete water a lytel ship al apparailled with sylke doune to the water / and the shyp cam ryghte vnto hem and lāded on the sandes / Thenne Arthur wente to the banke & loked in / and sawe none erthely creature therin / Sirs said the kyng come thens / and lete vs see what is in this ship / Soo they wente in al thre and founde hit rychely behanged with clothe of sylke / By thenne it was derke nyghte / and there sodenly were aboute them an C torches sette vpon alle the sydes of the shyp bordes and it gaf grete lyghte / And ther with all there Page  126 [leaf 63v] cam out twelue fayr damoysels and salewed kynge Arthur on her knees and called hym by his name / and sayd he was ryght welcome / and suche chere as they had he shold haue of the best / the kynge thanked hem fayre / There with all they lad the kyng and his two felawes in to a faire chambre / and ther was a clothe leyd rychely bysene of al that longed vnto a tabel / and there were they serued of al wynes and metes that they coude thynke / of that the kynge had grete merueille / for he ferd neuer better in his lyf as for one souper / And so when they had souped at her leyser / kyng Arthur was ledde vnto a chamber / a rycher besene chamber sawe he neuer none / and soo was kynge Vryens serued / and ledde in to suche another chābyr / and syr Accolon was ledde in to the thyrd chamber passynge rychely and wel bysene / and so were they layde in theire beddes easyly / And anone they felle on slepe / and slepte merueillously sore all the nyght / And on the morowe kynge Vryens was in Camelott abed in his wyues armes Morgan le fay / And whan he awoke / he had grete merueylle / how he cam there / for on the euen afore he was two dayes Iourney frō Camelot / And whan kyng Arthur awoke he found hym self in a derke pryson herynge aboute hym many complayntes of woful knyghtes

¶ Capitulum Septimum

WHat are ye that soo complayne said kynge Arthur / we ben here xx knyghtes prysoners sayd they / & some of vs haue layne here seuen yere and somme more and somme lasse / for what cause sayd Arthur / we shalle telle yow said the knyghtes / this lord of this castel his name is syr Damas / & he is the falsest knyght that lyueth / and ful of treason / and a very coward as ony lyueth / and he hath a yonger broder a good knyghte of prowesse / his name is syr Ontzlake / and this traytour Damas the elder broder wylle gyue hym noo parte of his lyuelode / But as syre Ontzlake kepeth thorow prowesse of his handes / and so he kepeth from hym a ful fair maner and a ryche and therin syre Ontzlake dwelleth worshipfully / and is wel biloued of al peple / & this syre Damas our maister is as euyll beloued for he is without mercy / and Page  127 [leaf 64r] he is acoward / and grete werre hath ben betwyxe them bothe / but Ontzlake hath euer the better / and euer he profereth syre Damas to fyghte for the lyuelode body for body / but he wylle not doo / other els to fynde a knyghte to fyghte for hym / Vnto that syr Damas hath graunted to fynde a knyghte / but he is so euyll byloued and hated / that there nys neuer a knyghte wylle fyghte for hym / And whan Damas sawe this that ther was neuer a knyght / wold fyghte for hym / he hath daily layn a wayte with many knyghtes with hym / and taken alle the knyghtes in this countrey to see and aspye her auentures / he hath taken hem by force and broughte hem to his pryson / and so he tooke vs seueratly as we rode on oure auentures / & many good knyȝtes haue dyed in this pryson for hongre to the nombre of xviij knyghtes / And yf ony of vs alle that here is or hath ben wold haue foughten with his broder Ontzlake / he wold haue delyuerd vs / but for by cause this Damas is so fals and so ful of treason we wold neuer fyghte for hym to dye for it / And we be soo lene for hongre that vnnethe we may stande on oure feete / god delyuer yow for his mercy sayd Arthur / Anone there with alle ther cam a damoysel vnto Arthur / and asked hym what chere / I can not say sayd he / sir sayd she and ye wylle fyghte for my lord ye shall be delyuerd oute of pryson / and els ye escape neuer the lyf / Now sayd Arthur that is hard / yet had I leuer to fyghte with a knyght than to dye in pryson / With this said Arthur I may be delyuerd and alle these prysoners I wylle doo the batail / yes said the damoysel / I am redy sayd Arthur and I had hors and armour / ye shalle lacke none said the damoysel / Me semeth damoysel I shold haue sene yow in the Courte of Arthur / Nay said the damoysel I cam neuer there / I am the lordes doughter of this castel / yet was she fals for she was one of the damoysels of Morgan le fay / Anone she wente vnto syr Damas and told hym how he wold doo bataille for hym / and so he sente for Arthur / And whan he cam he was wel coloured and wel made of his lymmes / that al knyȝtes that sawe hym said it were pyte that suche a knyghte shold dye in pryson / soo syr Damas and he were agreed that he shold fyghte for hym vpon this couenaūt that all other knyghtes shold be delyuerd Page  128 [leaf 64v] And vnto that was syr Damas sworne vnto Arthur / and also to doo the bataille to the vttermest / And with that all the xx knyghtes were brought oute of the derke pryson in to the halle and delyuerd / and so they all abode to see the bataille

¶ Capitulum Octauum

NOw torne we vnto Accolon of Gaulle that whanne he awoke / he found hym self by a depe welle syde within half a foote in grete perylle of dethe / And there cam oute of that fontayne a pype of syluer / and oute of that pype ranne water all on hyhe in a stone of marbel / whan syre Accolon sawe this / he blessyd hym and sayd Ihesu saue my lorde kyng Arthur and kynge Vryens / for these damoysels in this ship haue bitrayed vs / they were deuyls and noo wymmen / And yf I may escape this misauenture / I shalle destroye all where I may fynde these fals damoysels that vsen enchaūtementys /

¶ Ryght with that ther cam a dwarf with a grete mouthe & a flat nose and salewed syre Accolon and said how he came from Quene Morgan le fay / and she greteth yow wel / and byddeth yow be of strong herte / for ye shal fyȝte to morne with a knyghte at the houre of pryme / And therfore she hath sente yow here Excalibur Arthurs swerd and the scaubard / and she byddeth yow as ye loue her that ye doo batail to the vttermest without ony mercy lyke as ye had promysed her whā ye spake to gyder in pryuete / And what damoysel that bryngeth her the knyghtes hede whiche ye shal fyghte with al / she wille make her a quene / Now I vnderstand yow wel sayd Accolon / I shalle holde that I haue promysed her now I haue the swerd / whan sawe ye my lady Quene Morgan le fay Ryghte late sayd the dwarf / thenne Accolon tooke hym in his armes / and said recommaunde me vnto lady Quene / and telle her all shal be done that I haue promysed her / and els I wille dye for hit / Now I suppose said Accolon she hath made alle these craftes and enchauntement for this bataille / ye may wel bileue it said the dwarf / Ryȝt so there cam a knyghte and a lady with syxe squyers / and salewed Accolon / and prayd hym for to aryse and come and reste hym at his Page  129 [leaf 65r] maner / and so Accolon mounted vpon a voyde hors / & wente with the knyghte vnto a fayre maner by a pryory / and there he had passynge good chere / Thenne sir Damas sente vnto his broder syr Ontzelake / and badde make hym redy by to morne at the houre of pryme / and to be in the felde to fyghte wyth a a good knyght / for he had founden a good knyght that was redy to doo bataill at all poyntes / whan this word cam vnto sir Ontzelake / he was passyng heuy / for he was wounded a lytel to fore thorow bothe his thyes with a spere / and made grete dole / But as he was wounded he wold haue taken the bataille on hand / Soo it happed at that tyme by the meanes of Morgan le fay Accolon was with syr Ontzelake lodged / and whan he herd of that bataille and how Ontzelake was woūded / he sayd that he wold fyghte for hym by cause Morgan le fey had sente hym Excalibur and the shethe for to fyȝte with the knyght on the morne / This was the cause syr Accolon toke the bataille on hand / thenne syre Ontzelake was passynge glad / and thāked syr Accolon with alle his herte that he wold do so moche for hym / & ther with al syr Ontzelake sente word vnto his broder syre Damas / that he had a knyȝte þt for hym shold be redy in the felde by the houre of pryme / Soo on the morne syr Arthur was armed and wel horsed / and asked syr Damas whan shalle we to the felde / syr said syr Damas ye shalle here masse / and so Arthur herd a masse / And whan masse was done / there cam a squyer on a grete hors & asked syr Damas yf his knyght were redy / for oure knyght is redy in the felde / Thenne syre Arthur mounted vpon horsbak / & there were alle the knyghtes and comyns of that countrey / & so by alle aduyses ther were chosen xij good men of the countrey for to wayte vpon the two knyghtes / And ryght as Arthur was on horsbak / ther cam a damoisel from Morgan le fey and broughte vnto syr Arthur a swerd lyke vnto Excalibur / and the scaubard / and sayd vnto Arthur Morgan le fey sendeth here your swerd for grete loue / and he thanked her / & wende it had ben so / but she was fals / for the swerd and the scaubard was counterfeet & brutyll and fals

¶ Capitulum ix

Page  130 [leaf 65v]

ANd thenne they dressyd hem on bothe partyes of the felde / & lete their horses renne so fast that eyther smote other in the myddes of the shelde / with their speres hede / that bothe hors and man wente to the erthe / And thenne they sterte vp bothe / and pulled oute their swerdys / the meane whyle that they were thus at the bataille cam the damoysel of the lake in to the felde / that put Merlyn vnder the stone / & she cam thydder for loue of kynge Arthur / for she knewe how Morgan le fay had soo ordeyned / that kynge Arthur shold haue ben slayne that daye / and therfor she cam to saue his lyf And so they went egrely to the bataille / and gaf many grete strokes / but alweyes Arthurs swerd bote not lyke Accolon swerd / But for the most party euery stroke that Accolon gaf he wounded sore Arthur / that it was merueylle he stode / And alweyes his blood fylle from hym fast / whan Arthur beheld the ground so sore bebledde he was desmayed / and thenne he demed treason that his swerd was chaunged / for his swerd boote not styl as it was wonte to do / therfor he dredde hym sore to be dede / for euer hym semed that the swerd in Accolons hand was Excalibur / for at euery stroke that Accolon stroke he drewe blood on Arthur / Now knyghte said Accolon vnto Arthur kepe the wel from me / but Arthur ansuerd not ageyne / and gaf hym suche a buffet on the helme that he made hym to stoupe nygh fallynge doune to the erthe / Thenne syr Accolon withdrewe hym a lytel / and cam on with Excalibur on hyghe / and smote syr Arthur suche a buffet that he felle nyhe to the erthe / Thenne were they wroth bothe / and gaf eche other many sore strokes / but alweyes syr Arthur lost so moche blood that it was merueille he stode on his feet / but he was soo ful of knyghthode that knyghtly he endured the payne / And syr Accolon lost not a dele of blood / therfor he waxt passynge lyghte / and syr Arthur was passynge feble / and wende veryly to haue dyed / but for al that he made countenaunce as though he myghte endure / and helde Accolon as shorte as he myght / But Accolon was so bolde by cause of Excalibur that he waxed passynge hardy / But alle men that beheld hym sayd they sawe neuer knyghte fyghte so wel as Arthur dyd consyderyng the blood that he bled / Soo was all the peple sory for Page  131 [leaf 66r] hym / but the two bretheren wold not accorde / thene alweyes they sought to gyders as fyers knyghtes / and syre Arthur withdrewe hym a lytel for to reste hym / and syre Accolon called hym to bataille and said it is no tyme for me to suffre the to reste / And therwith he cam fyersly vpon Arthur / and syre Arthur was wrote for the blood that he had lost / and smote Accolon on hyhe vpon the helme soo myȝtely that he made hym nyhe to falle to the erthe / And therwith Arthurs swerd brast at the crosse and felle in the grasse amonge the blood and the pomel and the sure handels he helde in his handes / When syr arthur sawe that / he was in grete fere to dye / but alweyes he helde vp his shelde and lost no ground nor bated no chere /

¶ Capitulum x

THene syre Accolon beganne with wordes of treason and sayd knyghte thow arte ouercome / and maxste not endure and also thow arte wepenles / and thow hast loste moche of thy blood / and I am ful lothe to slee the / therfor yelde the to me as recreaunt / Nay saide syre Arthur I maye not so / for I haue promysed to doo the bataille to the vttermest by the feythe of my body whyle me lasteth the lyf / and therfor I had leuer to dye with honour than to lyue with shame / And yf it were possyble for me to dye an C tymes I had leuer to dye so ofte / than yelde me to the / for though I lacke wepen / I shalle lacke no worship / And yf thow slee me wepenles that shalle be thy shame / wel sayd Accolon as for the shame I wyl not spare / Now kepe the from me for thow arte but a dede mā And therwith Accolon gaf hym suche a stroke that he felle nyghe to the erthe / and wolde haue had Arthur to haue cryed hym mercy / But syre Arthur pressed vnto Accolon with his sheld / and gaf hym with the pomel in his hand suche a buffet that he went thre strydes abak / whan the damoisel of the lake beheld arthur / how ful of prowesse his body was & the fals treson that was wrouȝt for hym to haue had hym slayn she had grete pyte that so good a knyȝt & suche a mā of worship shold so be destroyed / And at the next stroke syr Accolon stroke hym suche a stroke that by the damoysels enchauntement the swerd Excalibur felle out of Accolons hande to the erthe / And therwith alle Syre Arthur lyghtely lepte to hit / and gate hit Page  132 [leaf 66v] in his hand / and forthwith al he knewe that it was his suerd Excalibur / & sayd thow hast ben from me al to long / & moche dommage hast thow done me / & ther with he aspyed the scaubard hangynge by his syde / and sodenly he sterte to hym and pulled the scaubard from hym and threwe hit fro hym as fer as he myghte throwe hit / O knyghte saide Arthur this daye hast thow done me grete dommage with this swerd / Now are ye come vnto your dethe / for I shalle not waraunt yow but ye shalle as wel be rewarded with this swerde or euer we departe as thow hast rewarded me / for moche payne haue ye made me to endure / and moche blood haue I lost / And therwith syr Arthur russhed on hym with alle his myghte and pulled hym to the erthe / and thēne russhed of his helme / and gaf hym suche a buffet on the hede that the blood cam oute at his eres / his nose & his mouthe / Now wylle I slee the said Arthur / Slee me ye may wel said Accolon and it please yow / for ye ar the best knyghte that euer I fonde / and I see wel that god is with yow / But for I promysed to do this batail said Accolon to the vttermest and neuer to be recreaunt whyle I lyued therfore shal I neuer yelde me with my mouthe / but god doo with my body what he wyll /

¶ Thenne syr Arthur remembrid hym and thoughte he shold haue sene this knyghte / Now telle me said Arthur or I wylle slee the / of what coūtrey art thou and of what courte / Syre knyghte sayd syr Accolon I am of the courte of kynge Arthur / & my name is Accolon of gaulle Thenne was Arthur more desmayed than he was before hand For thenne he remembryd hym of his syster Morgan le fay / and of the enchauntement of the ship / O syre knyghte sayd he I pray yow telle me who gaf yow this swerd and by whom ye had it /

¶ Capitulum xj

THenne syre Accolon bethouȝte hym and said wo worth this swerd / for by hit haue I geten my dethe / it may wel be / said the kynge / Now syre said Accolon I wil telle yow this swerd hath ben in my kepynge the moost party of this twelue moneth / And Morgan le fay kynge Vryens wyf sente it me yester daye by a dwerf to this entente that I shold slee kynge Arthur her broder / For ye shall vnderstand Page  133 [leaf 67r] entente to slee kyng Arthur her broder / for ye shal vnderstand kynge Arthur is the man in the world that she moost hateth by cause he is moost of worship and of prowesse of ony of her blood / Also she loueth me oute of mesure as paramour / and I her ageyne / And yf she myghte brynge aboute to slee Arthur by her craftes / she wold slee her husband kynge Vryens lyghtely / And thenne hadde she me deuysed to be kyng in this land / and soo to regne / and she to be my quene / but that is now done saide Accolon / for I am sure of my dethe wel sayd syre Arthur / I fele by yow ye wold haue ben kynge in this land / It had ben grete dommage to haue destroyed your lord sayd Arthur / it is trouth said Accolon / but now I haue told yow trouthe / wherfore I praye yow telle me of whens ye are and of what courte / O Accolon sayd kynge Arthur now I lete the wete / that I am kynge Arthur to whome thow haste done grete dommage / Whanne Accolon herd that / he cryed on lowde fayre swete lord haue mercy on me / for I knewe not yow / O syr Accolon sayd kynge Arthur mercy shalt thow haue / by cause I fele by thy wordes at this tyme / thow knowest not my persone / But I vnderstand wel by thy wordes that thow hast agreed to the dethe of my persone / and therfore thow arte a traytour / but I wyte the the lasse / for my syster Morgan le fay by her fals craftes made the to agree and consente to her fals lustes / but I shalle be sore auengyd vpon her and I lyue that alle Crystendome shalle speke of it / god knoweth / I haue honoured her and worshipped her more than alle my kynne / and more haue I trusted her than myn owne wyf and alle my kynne after /

¶ Thenne syr Arthur called the kepars of the felde and said Syrs cometh hyder / for here are we two knyghtes that haue foughten vnto a grete dommage vnto us both / and lyke echone of vs to haue slayne other / yf it had happed soo / And hadde ony of vs knowen other / here had ben no bataille / nor stroke stryken

¶ Thenne al a lowde cryed Accolon vnto alle the knyghtes and men that were thēne there gadred to gyder / and sayd to them in this manere / O lordes this noble knyghte that I haue foughten with all / the whiche me sore repenteth is the mooste man of prowesse of manhode and of Page  134 [leaf 67v] worship in the world / for it is hym self kynge Arthur our al ther liege lord & with myshap and with mysaūeture have I done this bataill with the kyng and lord that I am holden with all

¶ Capitulum xij

THenne alle the peple felle doune on her knees and cryed kynge Arthur mercy / mercy shalle ye haue sayd Arthur / here maye ye see what auentures befallen oftyme of erraunte knyghtes how that I haue foughten with a knyght of myn owne vnto my grete dommage and his bothe / But syrs by cause I am sore hurte and he bothe / and I had grete nede of a lytel rest / ye shalle vnderstande the oppynyon betwixe yow two bretheren as to the syre Damas / for whom I haue ben champyon and wonne the feld of this knyghte / yet wylle I Iuge by cause ye syre Damas are called an orgulous knyghte and full of vylony and not worthe of prowesse of youre dedes / therfor I wylle that ye gyue vnto your broder alle the hole manoir with the appertenaūce vnder thys forme / that sir Ontzelake hold the manoir of yow / and yerely to gyue yow a palfrey to ryde vpon / for that wylle become yow better to ryde on than vpon a courser / Also I charge the syre Damas vpon payne of deth / that thow neuer destresse no knyȝtes erraunte that ryde on their aduenture / And also that thow restore these xx knyghtes that thow hast longe kepte prysoners of all their harneis that they be content for / and yf ony of hem come to my court and complayne of the / by my hede thou shalt dye therfore / Also syre Ontzelake as to yow by cause ye are named a good knyghte and ful of prowesse and true and gentyl in all your dedes this shalle be youre charge I wylle gyue yow that in al goodely haste ye come vnto me and my courte and ye shalle be a knyghte of myne / and yf your dedes be there after I shall so proferre yow by the grace of god that ye shalle in shorte tyme be in ease for to lyue as worshipfully as your broder syre Damas / God thanke your largenesse of your goodenes & of your bounte / I shall be from hens forward at all tymes at your commaundement / For syr said syr Ontzelake as god wold as I was hurte but late with an aduentures knyght thurgh both my thyes that greued me sore / & els Page  135 [leaf 68r] had I done this bataille with yow / god wold sayd Arthur it had ben so / for thenne had not I ben hurte as I am / I shalle telle you the cause why / for I had not ben hurte as I am hadde not ben myne owne swerd / that was stolen from me by treason / And this bataille was ordeyned afore hand to haue slayne me / and so it was brouȝte to the purpos by fals treason and by fals enchauntement / Allas said syr Ontzelake that is greete pyte that euer soo noble a man as ye are of your dedes and prowesse / that ony man or woman myȝt fynde in their hertes to worche ony treason ageynst yow / I shalle reward them said Arthur in short tyme by the grace of god Now telle me said Arthur how fer am I from Camelot / syr ye are two dayes iourney ther fro / I wold fayn be at some place of worship said syr Arthur that I myghte reste me / Syre said syr Ontzelake / here by is a ryche abbey of your elders foūdacyon of Nonnes but thre myle hens / So the kynge took his leue of alle the peple / and mounted vpon horsbak / and sir Accolon with hym / And whan they were come to the Abbaye / he lete fetche leches and serche his woundes and Accolons bothe / but syr Accolon dyed within four dayes / for he had bled soo moche blood that he myghte not lyue / but kyng Arthur was wel recouerd / Soo whan Accolon was dede / he lete sende hym on a horsbere with syxe knyghtes vnto Camelot / and said / bere hym to my syster Morgan le fay / and say that I sende her hym to a presente / and telle her I haue my swerd Excalibur and the scaubard / soo they departed with the body

¶ Capitulum xiij

THe meane whyle Morgan le fay hadde wend kynge Arthur had been dede / soo on a day she aspyed kynge Vryens lay in his bedde slepynge / thenne she called vnto her a mayden of her counceyll / & said go fetche me my lordes swerd for I sawe neuer better tyme to slee hym than now /

¶ O Madame sayd the damoysel / and ye slee my lord ye can neuer escape / Care not yow said Morgan le fay / for now I see my tyme in the whiche it is best to doo hit / And therfor hye the fast and fetche me the suerd / Then̄e the damoisel departed Page  136 [leaf 68v] fonde syre Vwayne slepynge vpon a bedde in another chamber soo she wente vnto sire Vwayne and awaked hym / and badde hym aryse and wayte on my lady youre moder / for she wille slee the kynge your fader slepynge in his bedde / for I goo to fetche his swerd / wel said syr Vwayne go on your waye / and lete me dele / Anone the damoysel brought Morgan the swerd with quakynge handes / and lyghtely took the swerd / & pulled it out / and wente boldely vnto the beddes syde / and awayted how and where she myght sle hym best / And as she lyfte vp the swerd to smyte / sir Vwayne lepte vnto his moder and caughte her by the hand and sayd A fende what wilt thow do And thow were not my moder with this swerd I shold smyte of thy hede / A sayd syr Vwayn men saith that Merlyn was begoten of a deuylle / but I may saye an erthely deuylle bare me / O fayre sone Vwayne haue mercy vpon me / I was tempted with a deuylle / wherfore I crye the mercy / I wylle neuer more doo soo and saue my worship and discouer me not / On this couenaunt said syr Vwayne I wille forgyue it yow / soo ye wille neuer be aboute to doo suche dedes / Nay sone said she / & that I make yow assuraunce /

¶ Capitulum xiiij

THenne came tydynges vnto Morgan le fay that Accolon was dede / and his body brought vnto the chirche And how kynge Arthur had his swerd ageyne / But whanne Quene Morgan wyste that Accolon was dede / she was soo sorouful that nere hir herte to brast / But by cause she wold not it were knowen / oute ward she kepte her countece naun / & maade no semblaunt of sorowe / But wel she wyste and she abode tyll her broder Arthur cam thyder / there shold no gold goo for her lyf

¶ Thenne she wente vnto Quene Gweneuer / and asked her leue to ryde in to the countreye / ye maye abyde sayde Quene Gweneuer tyll youre brother the kynge come home / I maye not sayde Morgan le fay / for I haue suche hasty tydynges / that I may not tary / wel saide Gueneuer ye maye departe Page  137 [leaf 69r] whanne ye wille / Soo erly on the morne or hit was daye she tooke her hors and rode alle that daye and mooste parte of the nyghte / And on the morn by none she cam to the same Abbay of Nonnes / where as lay kyng arthur / & she knowyng he was there she asked where he was / And they ansuerd how he had leyd hym in his bed to slepe / for he had had but lytel reste these thre nyghtes / Wel said she I charge yow that none of yow awake hym tyl I doo / and thenne she alyghte of her hors / & thoughte for to stele awey Excalibur his swerd / and soo she wente streyghte vnto his chamber / And noo man durste dysobeye her commaundement / and there she fond Arthur a slepe in his bedde and Excalibur in his ryght hand naked / Whan she sawe that she was passynge heuy that she myghte not come by the swerd withoute she had awaked hym / and thenne she wyst wel she had ben dede / Thenne she tooke the scaubard and wente her wey on horsbak / whan the kynge awoke and myssed his scaubard / he was wrothe / and he asked who had ben there / and they said his syster quene Morgan had ben ther and had put the scaubard vnder her mantel and was gone / Allas sayd Arthur falsly ye haue watched me / Syre sayd they alle we durste not disobeye your systers commaundement A said the kynge lete fetche the best hors maye be founde / And byd syre Ontzlake arme hym in al hast / and take another good hors and ryde with me / Soo anone the kynge and Ontzelake were wel armed / and rode after this lady / and soo they cam by a crosse and found a Cowherd / and they asked the poure man yf ther cam ony lady rydynge that way / Syre said this poure man / ryght late cam a lady rydynge with a xl horses / and to yonder forest she rode / Thenne they spored theire horses / and folowed fast / And within a whyle Arthur had a syghte of Morgan le fay / thenne he chaced as fast as he myghte / whanne she aspyed hym folowynge her / she rode a gretter paas thorowe the forest tyl she cam to a playne / And whanne she sawe she myghte not escape she rode vnto a lake ther by / & sayd what soo euer come of me / my broder shall not haue this scaubard / And thenne she lete throwe the scauberd in the depest of the water soo it sanke / for it was heuy of gold and precious stones

¶ Thenne she rode in to a valeye Page  138 [leaf 69v] where many grete stones were / And whan she sawe she muste be ouertake she shope her self hors and man by enchauntemēt vnto a grete marbyl stone / Anone with al cam Syr Arthur / and syr Ontzelake where as the kynge myght knowe his syster and her men / and one knyght from another / A sayd the kynge here may ye see the vengeaunce of god / & now am I sory that this mysauenture is befalle / & thenne he loked for the scaubard / but it wold not be founde / so he retorned to the Abbeye there he came fro / So whan Arthur was gone / she torned alle in to the lykenesse as she and they were before / and sayd syrs now may we goo where we wylle /

¶ Capitulum xv

THenne said Morgan sawe ye Arthur my broder / ye said her knyghtes ryght wel / and that ye shold haue founde and we myghte haue stered from one stede / for by his armyuestal contenaunce he wold haue caused vs to have fled I byleue yow said Morgan / Anone after as she rode she met a knyght ledyng another knyȝt on his hors before hym bounde hand and foote blyndefeld to haue drouned hym in a fontayne / whan she sawe this knyȝt so boūde / she asked hym what wylle ye doo with that knyght / lady said he I wylle drowne hym / for what cause she asked / for I fonde hym with my wyf and she shalle haue the same dethe anone / that were pyte sayd Morgan le fay / Now what saye ye knyȝt is it trouthe þt he saith of yow she said to the knyght that shold be drowned / nay truly madame he seith not ryght on me / Of whens be ye sayd Morgan le fay and of what countre / I am of the Courte of kynge Arthur / and my name is Manassen cosyn vnto Accolon of gaulle / ye say wel said she / and for the loue of hym ye shalle be delyuerd / and ye shalle haue your aduersary in the same caas ye be in / So Manessen was losed & the other knyght bounde / And anone Manessen vnarmed hym and armed hym self in his harneis / and soo mounted on horsbak / and the knyght afore hym and soo threwe hym in to the fontayne and drowned hym / And thenne he rode vnto Morgan ageyne / & asked yf she wold ony thyng vnto kynge Arthur / Telle hym that I rescued the / not for the loue of hym but for the loue of Accolon / and telle hym I fere hym not whyle I can make me Page  139 [leaf 70r] and them that ben with me in lykenes of stones / And lete hym wete I can doo more whan I see my tyme / And so she departed in to the countrey of Gorre / and there was she rychely receyued / and maade her castels and townes passynge stronge / for alweyes she drad moche kynge Arthur / Whanne the kynge had wel rested hym at the Abbey he rode vnto Camelot / and fonde his quene and his barons ryght glad of his comynge / And whan they herd of his straunge auentures as is afore reherced / they alle hadde merueille of the falshede of Morgan le fay / many knyghtes wysshed her brent / thenne cam Manessen to courte and told the kyng of his auenture / well said the kynge she is a kynde syster / I shalle soo be auengid on her and I lyue / that alle Crystendome shalle speke of hit / So on the morne ther cam a damoisel from Morgan to the kynge and she brought with her the rychest mantel that euer was sene in that Courte / for it was sette as ful of precious stones as one myght stand by another / and there were the rychest stones that euer the kynge sawe / And the damoysel saide youre syster sendeth yow this mantel / and desyreth that ye shold take this gyfte of her / And in what thyng she hath offended you she wille amende it at youre owne pleasyr / whan the kyng beheld this mantel it pleasyd hym moche / but he said but lytel

¶ Capitulum xvj

WYth that came the damoysel of the lake vnto the kyng and said syr I must speke with yow in pryuyte / say on said the kynge what ye wille / Syr sayd the damoysel put not on yow this mantel tyl ye haue sene more / and in no wyse lete it not come on yow nor on no knyghte of yours tyl ye commaunde the brynger thereof to put it vpon her / wel said kynge Arthur / It shalle be done as ye counceille me / And thenne he said vnto the damoysel that cam fro his sister / damoisel this mantel that ye haue brought me I wille see it vpon yow / syr she said / it wille not biseme me to were a kynges garment / by my hede said Arthur / ye shalle were it or it come on my bak or ony mans that here is / and so the kyng made it to be putt vpon her / And forth with al she felle doune dede / and neuer more Page  140 [leaf 70v] spake word after and brente to coles / Thenne was the kyng wonderly wrothe more than he was to fore hand / and sayd vnto kynge Vryens my syster your wyf is alwey aboute to bytraye me / and wel I wote outher ye or my neuewe youre sone is of counceille with her to haue me destroyed / But as for yow said the kyng to kynge Vryens I deme not gretely that ye be of her counceill / For Accolon confessyd to me by his own mouth that she wold haue destroyed yow as wel as me ther for I hold yow excused / But as for your sone Syr Vwayn I hold hym suspect / therfore I charge yow put hym oute of my courte / So syr Vwayne was discharged / And whanne Syr Gawayne wyst that he made hym redy to go with hym / & said who so bannyssheth my cosyn germayn / shal bannysshe me Soo they two departed / and rode in to a grete forest / and soo they came to an Abbay of Monkes / and ther were wel lodged But whanne the kynge wyst that syr Gawayne was departed from the Courte / ther was made grete sorowe amonge alle the estates / Now sayd Gaherys Gawayns broder we haue lost two good knyghtes for the loue of one / So on the morne they herd their masses in the abbay / and so they rode forth tyl that they came to a grete forest / thenne was syr Gawayne ware in a valey by a turret xij fayre damoysels / and two knyghtes armed on grete horses / and the damoysels wente to and fro by a tree / And thenne was syr Gawayne ware how ther henge a whyte shelde on that tree / And euer as the damoysels cam by it / they spytte vpon it / and some threwe myre vpon the sheld /

¶ Capitulum xvij

THenne syr Gawayne and syr Vwayne wente and salewed them / and asked why they dyd that despyte to the shelde / Syrs saiden the damoysels / we shalle telle yow / There is a knyght in this coūtrey that oweth this whyte sheld and he is a passyng good man of his handes / but he hateth al ladyes and gentylwymmen / and therfor we doo alle this despyte to the shelde / I shall say yow said syr gawayne / hit bysemeth euylle a good knyghte to despyse all ladyes and gentil wymmen / And parauentur though he hate yow he hath somme Page  141 [leaf 71r] And parauenture he loueth in somme other places ladyes and gentylwymmen / and to be loued ageyne / and he be suche a mā of prowesse as ye speke of / Now what is his name / syr sayd they / his name is Marhaus the kynges sone of Irelond I knowe hym wel sayd syre Vwayne / he is a passynge good knyght as ony is on lyue / for I sawe hym ones preued at a Iustes where many knyghtes were gadered / and that tyme ther myghte no man withstande hym / A sayd syr Gawayne Damoysels me thynketh ye are to blame / for hit is to suppose / he that henge that sheld ther / he wille not be longe ther fro / & thenne may tho knyghtes matche hym on horsbak / and that is more your worship than thus / For I wille abyde no lenger to see a knyghtes sheld dishonoured / And therwith syre Vwayne and Gawayne departed a lytel fro them / And thenne were they ware where syre Marhaus cam rydynge on a grete hors streyghte toward them / And whanne the xij damoysels sawe syr Marhaus they fled in to the turret as they were wylde so that somme of them felle by the wey / Thenne the one of the knyghtes of the Toure dressid his shelde and said on hyghe syr Marhaus defende the / and soo they ranne to gyders that the knyȝt brake his spere on Marhaus / & Marhaus smote hym so hard that he brake his neck and the hors back / That sawe the other knyght of the turret and dressyd hym toward Marhaus / and they mette so egrely to gyders that the knyght of the Turret was soone smyten doune hors and man stark dede /

¶ Capitulum xviij

*

ANd thenne syre Marhaus rode vnto his shelde / and sawe how it was defowled / and sayd of this despyte I am a parte auengyd / But for her loue that gaf me this whyte shelde I shalle were the / and hange myn where thow was and soo he hanged it aboute his neck / Thenne he rode streyght vnto syr Gawayn and to syr Vwayne / and asked them what they dyd there / They ansuerd hym that they cam from kynge Arthurs courte for to see auentures / wel sayd syre Marhaus here am I redy an auentures knyghte that wille fulfylle ony Page  142 [leaf 71v] aduenture that ye wylle desyre / And soo departed fro them / to fetche his raunge / lete hym goo seid syr Vwayn vnto syre Gawayne / for he is a passynge good knyghte as ony is lyuynge / I wold not by my wille that ony of vs were matched with hym / Nay said sir Gawayne not so / it were shame to vs were he not assayed were he neuer soo good a knyghte / wel said syr Vwayne I wylle assaye hym afore yow / for I am more weyker than ye / And yf he smyte me doune / thenne may ye reuenge me / soo these two knyghtes cam to gyders with grete raundon that syr Vwayne smote syr Marhaus that his spere braste in pyeces on the shelde / and Syre Marhaus smote hym so sore that hors and man he bare to the erthe / and hurte syre Vwayne on the lyfte syde / Thenne syr Marhaus torned his hors and rode toward Gawayne with his spere / and when syr Gawayne sawe that / he dressid his sheld / and they auentryd their speres / and they cam to gyders with alle the myȝte of their horses / that eyther knyght smote other so hard in myddes of theyr sheldes / but syr Gawayns spere brak / but sir marhaus spere helde / And therwith syre Gawayne and his hors russhed doune to the erthe / And lyghtly syre Gawayne rose on his feet / and pulled out his swerd / and dressyd hym toward syr Marhaus on foote / and syr marhaus sawe that / and pulled oute his fwerd / and beganne to come to syr Gawayne on horsbak / Syre knyght said syr gawayn alyȝte on foote or els I wylle slee thy hors / gramercy sayd syr Marhaus of youre gentylnes ye teche me curtosye / for hit is not for one knyȝt to be on foote / and the other on horsbak / & therwith syr Marhaus sette his spere ageyne a tree and alyghte and tayed his hors to a tree / and dressid his shelde / and eyther cam vnto other egerly / and smote to gyders with her swerdes that her sheldes flewe in cantels / and they brysed their helmes and their hauberkes and wounded eyther other / but Syre gawayne fro it passed ix of the clok waxed euer stronger and stronger / for thenne hit cam to the houre of noone & thryes his myghte was encreaced / Alle this aspyed syr Marhaus and had grete wonder how his myghte encreaced / and so they wounded other passynge sore / And thenne whan it was past noone / and whan it drewe toward euensonge syre gawayns strengthe febled &Page  143 [leaf 72r] waxt passynge faynte that vnnethes he myght dure ony lenger / and syr Marhaus was thenne bygger and bygger / syre knyght said syr Marhaus / I haue wel felt that ye are a passynge good knyghte and a merueyllous man of myghte as euer I felt ony / whyle hit lasteth / And oure quarels are not grete / and therfor it were pyte to doo yow hurte / for I fele ye are passynge feble / A said syr Gawayn gentyl knyghte ye say the word that I shold say / And therwith they took of theire helmes / and eyther kyssed other / and there they swore to gyders eyther to loue other as bretheren / And syr Marhaus prayd syr gawayn to lodge with hym that nyghte / And so they toke theyr horses / and rode toward syr Marhaus hous / And as they rode by the wey / syr knyghte said syr gawayne I haue merueylle that so valyaunt a man as ye be loue no ladyes ne damoysels / Syre sayd syr marhaus they name me wrongfully tho that gyue me that name / but wel I wote it ben the damoyseles of the Turret that so name me and other suche as they be / Now shalle I telle yow for what cause I hate them / For they be sorceresses and enchaunters many of them / & be a knyȝt neuer so good of his body and ful of prowesse as man may be / they wille make hym a stark coward to haue the better of hym / and this is the pryncipal cause that I hate them & to al good ladyes and gentyl wymmen I owe my seruyse as a knyght ouȝte to do / As the book reherceth in frensshe ther were many knyghtes that ouermatched syr gawayne for alle the thryes myghte that he had / Syr Launcelot de lake / syr Trystrams / syr Bors de ganys / syr Percyuale / syr Pellias & syr Marhaus / these sixe knyȝtes had the better of sir gawayn Thenne within a lytel whyle they cam to syr Marhaus place / whiche was in a lytel pryory / and there they alyghte and ladyes and damoysels vnarmed them / and hastely loked to theyr hurtes / for they were all thre hurte / and so they had all thre good lodgynge with syr Marhaus and good chere / for whan he wyst that they were kynge Arthurs syster sones / he maade them al the chere that lay in his power / and so they soiourned there a vij nyghte / and were wel easyd of their woundes and at the last departed / Now said syre Marhaus we wylle not departe soo lyȝtely / for I wylle brynge you thorow the forest Page  144 [leaf 72v] And rode daye by day wel a seuen dayes or they fond ony auenture / At the last they cam in to a grete forest that was named the countreye and foreste of Arroy and the countrey of straunge auentures / In this countrey sayd syr Marhaus cam neuer knyghte syn it was crystened / but he fonde straunge auentures / and soo they rode / and cam in to a depe valey ful of stones / and ther by they sawe a fayr streme of water / aboue ther by was the hede of the streme a fayr fontayne / & thre damoysels syttynge therby / And thenne they rode to them / and eyther salewed other / and the eldest had a garland of gold aboute her hede / and she was thre score wynter of age / or more and her here was whyte vnder the garland / The second damoysel was of thyrtty wynter of age with a serkelet of gold aboute her hede / The thyrd damoysel was but xv yere of age / and a garland of floures aboute her hede / when these knyghtes had soo beholde them / they asked hem the cause why they sat at that fontayne / we be here sayd the damoysels for thys cause / yf we may see ony erraunt knyghtes to teche hem vnto straunge auentures / and ye be thre knyghtes that seken auentures and we be thre damoysels / and therfore eche one of yow must chese one of vs / And whan ye haue done soo / we wylle lede yow vnto thre hyhe wayes / and there eche of yow shal chese a wey and his damoysel with hym / And this day twelue monethe ye must mete here ageyn / and god sende yow your lyues / and there to ye must plyȝte your trouthe / this is wel said sayd syr Marhaus

¶ Capitulum xx

NOw shalle eueryche of vs chese a damoysel / I shalle telle yow sayd syre Vwayne I am the yongest and moost weykest of yow bothe / therfor I wyl haue the eldest damoysel / for she hath sene moche and can best helpe me whan I haue nede / for I haue moost nede of helpe of yow bothe / Now said syr Marhaus I wyll haue the damoysel of thyrtty wynter age for she falleth best to me / wel sayd syre gawayne / I thanke yow for ye haue lefte me the yongest and the fayrest / and she is moost leuest to me / Thenne euery damoysel tooke her Page  145 [leaf 73r] knyght by the raynes of his brydel / and broughte him to the thre wayes / and there was their othe made to mete at the fontayne that day twelue moneth and they were lyuynge / and soo they kyst and departed / and eueryche knyghte sette his lady behynd hym / and syr Vwayne took the wey that lay west And syr Marhaus took the wey that lay southe / and syr gawayne took the weye that laye northe / Now wylle we begynne at syr gawayne that helde that wey tyll that he cam vnto a fayre manoir where dwellyd an old knyghte & a good housholder / and there syr Gawayn asked the knyght yf he knewe ony auentures in that countrey / I shalle shewe yow somme to morne sayd the old knyghte / and that merueyllous / Soo on the morne they rode in to the forest of aduentures tyl they cam to a launde / and ther by they fond a crosse / and as they stode and houed / ther cam by them the fayrest knyght and the semelyest man that euer they sawe / makynge the grettest dole that euer man made / And thenne he was ware of syr gawayn and salewed hym and praid god to sende hym moche worship / As to that said syr gawayn gramercy / Also I praye to god that he send yow honour and worship / A said the knyghte I may laye that on syde / for sorowe and shame cometh to me after worship /

¶ Capitulum xxj

ANd ther with he passed vnto the one syde of the launde / And on the other syde sawe syr Gawayne & knyȝtes that houed styll and make hem redy with her sheldes and speres ageynst that one knyght that cam by syr gawayn / Thenne this one knyght auentryd a grete spere / and one of the x knyghtes encountred with hym / but this woful knyght smote hym so hard that he felle ouer his hors taylle / So this same dolorous knyȝt serued hem al / that at the lest way he smote doune hors and man / and alle he dyd with one spere / and soo whan they were all x on fote / they wente to that one knyght / and he stode stone styll / and suffred hem to pulle hym doune of his hors / and bound hym hande and foote / and tayed hym vnder the hors bely / and so ledde hym with hem / O Ihesu Page  146 [leaf 73v] sayd syr gawayne this is a dooleful syghte / to see the yonder knyghte so to be entreted / and it semeth by the knyght that he suffreth hem to bynde hym soo / for he maketh no resystence / Noo said his hoost that is trouthe / for and he wold they al were to weyke soo to doo hym / Syr said the damoyfel vnto syr Gawayn / me semeth hit were your worship to helpe that dolorous knyghte / for me thynketh he is one of the best knyghtes that euer I sawe / I wold doo for hym sayd syre gawayn but hit semeth he wylle haue no helpe / thenne sayd the damoysel me thynketh ye haue no luste to helpe hym / Thus as they talked they sawe a knyȝte on the other syde of the launde al armed sauf the hede / And on the other syde ther cam a dwerf on horsbak all armed sauf the hede with a grete mouthe / and a shorte nose / And whan the dwerf came nyghe he said where is the lady shold mete vs here / and ther with all she came forth out of the wood / And thenne they began to stryue for the lady / For the knyghte sayd he wold haue her / & the dwerf said he wold haue her / Wylle we doo wel sayd the dwerf / yonder is a knyht at the crosse / lete vs put it bothe vpon hym / and as he demeth so shalle it be / I wylle wel said the knyght / and so they wente all thre vnto syre gawayn and told hym wherfor they strofe / wel syrs said he wylle ye put the mater in my hand / ye they sayd both / Now damoysel sayd syr gawayn ye shal stande betwixe them both / and whether ye lyst better to go to / he shal haue yow / And whan she was sette bitwene them both she left the knyghte and wente to the dwerf / and the dwerf took her and wente his waye syngynge / and the knyghte wente hys wey with grete mornyng / Thenne cam ther two knyghtes all armed and cryed on hyghe Syre gawayn / knyghte of kynge Arthurs make the redy in al hast and Iuste with me / soo they ranne to gyders that eyther felle doune / and thenne on foote they drewe their swerdes and dyd ful actually / the mene whyle the other knyghte wente to the damoysel / and asked her / why she abode with that knyghte / and yf ye wold abyde with me / I wylle be your feythful knyghte and with yow wylle I be said the damoysel / for with syr Gawayn I may not fynde in myn herte to be with hym / For now here was one knyȝt scomfyte x knyghtes / And at the laste he was cowardly led Page  147 [leaf 74r] awey / and therfore lete vs two goo whylest they fyghte / and syre Gawayne fought with that other knyght longe / but at the last they accorded both / And thenne the knyght prayd syr gawayn to lodge with hym that nyghte / Soo as syre Gawayn wente with this knyghte he asked hym what knyghte is he in this countrey that smote doune the ten knyghtes / for whan he had done so manfully he suffred hem to bynde hym hand and foote / and soo ledde hym away / A sayd the knyghte that is the best knyght I trowe in the world / and the moost man of prowesse / and he hath be serued soo as he was ēne more than x tymes / and his name hyghte syr Pelleas / and he loueth a grete lady in this countrey and her name is Ettard / and so when he loued her there was cryed in this country a greete Iustes thre dayes / And alle the knyghtes of this countrey were there and gentylwymmen / And who that preued hym the best knyght shold haue a passyng good swerd and a Serklet of gold and the serklet the knyght shold gyue hit to the fayrest lady that was at the Iustes / And this knyghte syre Pelleas was the best knyghte that was there / and there were fyue honderd knyghtes / but there was neuer man that euer syre Pelleas met with al / but he stroke hym doune or els from his hors / And euery day of thre dayes he strake doune twenty knyghtes / therfore they gaf hym the pryse / & forthe with all he wente there as the lady Ettard was / and gaf her the serklet / & said openly / she was the fayrest lady that ther was / & that wold he preue vpon ony knyghte that wold say nay /

¶ Ca xxij

ANd soo he chose her for his souerayne lady / & neuer to loue other but her / but she was so proude that she had scorne ef hym and sayd that she wold neuer loue hym thouȝ he wold dye for her / wherfor al ladyes and gentylwymmen hadde scorne of her that she was so proude / for there were fayrer than she / & ther was none that was ther but & sir Pelleas wold haue proferd hem loue they wold haue loued hym for his noble prowesse / & so this knyȝt promysed the lady ettard to folowe her in to this coūtrey / & neuer to leue her tyl she loued hym / & thus he is here the moost party nyghe her and lodged by a pryory / and euery weke she sendeth knyghtes to fyȝte with hym / And whan he hath put hem to the wers than wylle Page  148 [leaf 74v] he suffre hem wylfully to take hym prysoner by cause he wold haue a syghte of this lady / And alweyes she doth hym grete despyte / for some tyme she maketh her knyghtes to taye hym to his hors taylle and some to bynd hym vnder the hors bely Thus in the moost shamefullest wyse that she can thynke he is broughte to her / And alle she doth hyt for to cause hym to leue this countreye and to leue his louynge / But all this can not make hym to leue / for and he wold haue foughte on foote he myghte haue had the better of the ten knyghtes as wel on foote as on horsbak / Allas sayd syr gawayn it is grete pyte of hym / And after this nyghte I wylle seke hym to morowe in this forest to doo hym alle the helpe I can / So on the morne syr gawayne tooke his leue of his hoost syre Carados and rode in to the forest / And at the last he mette with syr Pelleas makyng grete moone oute of mesure / so eche of hem salewed other / and asked hym why he made suche sorowe / And as it is aboue reherced / syre Pelleas told syre Gawayne / but alweyes I suffre her knyghtes to fare soo with me as ye sawe yesterdaye in truste at the last to wynne her loue / for she knoweth wel alle her knyghtes shold not lyghtely wynne me / and me lyste to fyghte with them to the vttermest / Wherfore and I loued her not so sore I hadde leuer dye an honderd tymes / and I myght dye soo ofte rather than I wold suffre that despyte / but I truste she wylle haue pyte vpon me at the laste / for loue causeth many a good knyght to suffre to haue his entent / but allas I am vnfortunate / And ther with he maade soo grete dole & sorowe that vnnethe he myghte holde hym on horsback

¶ Now sayd syre gawayne leue your mornynge and I shalle promyse yow by the feythe of my body to doo alle that lyeth in my power to gete yow the loue of your lady / and ther to I wylle plyte yow my trouthe / A sayd syr Pelleas of what Courte are ye telle me I praye yow my good frend / And thenne syr gawayne sayd I am of the courte of kynge Arthur / and his susters sone / and kynge Lott of Orkeney was my fader / and my name is syre Gawayne / And thenne he sayd my name is Syre Pelleas borne in the Iles / and of many Iles I am lord / and neuer haue I loued lady nor damoysel tyl now in an vnhappy tyme / and syr Page  149 [leaf 75r] knyghte syn ye are soo nyghe cosyn vnto kynge Arthur and a kynges sone / therfor bytraye me not but helpe me / for I may neuer come by her but by somme good knyghte / for she is in a stronge castel here fast by within this four myle / and ouer all this countrey she is lady of / And so I may neuer come to her presence / but as I suffre her knyghtes to take me / and but yf I dyd so that I myghte haue a syghte of her I had ben dede long or this tyme / and yet fayre word had I neuer of her / but whā I am brought to fore her she rebuketh me in the fowlest maner / And thenne they take my hors and harneis and putten me oute of the yates / and she wylle not suffre me to ete nor drynke / and alweyes I offre me to be her prysoner / but that she wylle not suffre me / for I wold desyre no more what paynes so euer I had / soo that I myȝte haue a syghte of her dayly / wel sayd syr gawayne / Al this shalle I amende and ye wylle do as I shal deuyse / I wylle haue your hors and your armour / and so wylle I ryde vnto her castel and telle her that I haue slayne yow / and soo shal I come withynne her to cause her to cherysshe me / And thenne shalle I do my true parte that ye shalle not faylle to haue the loue of her

¶ Capitulum xxiij

ANd there with syr Gawayne plyghte his trouthe vnto syr Pelleas to be true and feythful vnto hym / soo eche one plyghte their trouthe to other / and soo they chaunged horses and harneis / and sire Gawayn departed / and came to the castel where as stoode the pauelions of this lady withoute the yate / And as soone as Ettard had aspyed syr Gawayn she fledde in toward the castel / syr Gawayn spak on hyghe / and badde her abyde / for he was not syre Pelleas / I am another knyghte that haue slayne syr Pelleas / doo of youre helme said the lady Ettard that I maye see your vysage / And soo whan she sawe that it was not syr Pelleas / she made hym alyghte / and ledde hym vnto her castel / and asked hym feythfully / whether he had slayne syr Pelleas / and he sayd her ye / and told her his name was syre gawayn of the courte of kynge Arthur and his syster sone / Truly sayd she that is grete pyte for he was a passynge good knyghte of his body / but Page  150 [leaf 75v] of al men on lyue I hated hym moost / for I coude neuer be quyte of hym / And for ye haue slayne hym / I shalle be your woman and to doo ony thynge that myghte please yow / Soo she made syr Gawayne good chere / Thenne syr gawayn sayd that he loued a lady / and by no meane she wold loue hym / She is to blame sayd Ettard and she wylle not loue yow / for ye that be soo wel borne a man and suche a man of prowesse / there is no lady in the world to good for yow / wylle ye sayd syre Gawayne promyse me to doo alle that ye maye by the feythe of youre body to gete me the loue of my lady / ye syre sayd she / and that I promyse yow by the feythe of my body / Now sayd syre Gawayne it is your self that I loue so wel / therfore I praye yow hold your promyse / I maye not chese sayd the lady Ettard / but yf I shold be forsworne / and soo she graunted hym to fulfylle alle his desyre /

¶ Soo it was thenne in the moneth of May that she and syre Gawayn wente oute of the castel and souped in a pauelione / and there was made a bedde / and there syre gawayne and the lady Ettard wente to bedde to gyders / and in another pauelione she layd her damoysels / and in the thyrd pauelione she leyd parte of her knyghtes / for thenne she had no drede of syr Pelleas / And there syre gawayn lay with her in that pauelione two dayes and two nyghtes / And on the thyrd day in the mornyng erly syr Pelleas armed hym / for he hadde neuer slepte syn syr Gawayn departed from hym / for syr Gawayne had promysed hym by the feythe of hys body to come to hym vnto his pauelione by that pryory within the space of a daye and a nyghte

¶ Thenne syre Pelleas mounted vpon horsbak / and cam to the pauelions that stode without the castel / and fonde in the fyrst pauelione thre knyghtes in thre beddes / and thre squyers lyggynge at theire feet / thenne wente he to the seconde pauelione & fond four gentyl wymmen lyenge in four beddes / & thenne he yede to the thyrd pauelion & fond syr gawayn lyggyng in bedde with his lady Ettard & eyther clyppyng other in armes / and whan he sawe that his herte wel nyghe brast for sorou / & said Allas that euer a knyȝt shold be founde so fals / and thēne he took his hors & myȝt not abyde no lenger for pure sorowe / And whanne he hadde ryden Page  151 [leaf 76r] nyghe half a myle he torned ageyne and thoughte to slee hem bothe / And whanne he sawe hem bothe soo lye slepynge faste / vnnethe he myght holde hym on horsbak for sorowe / and sayd then to hym self / though this knyght be neuer soo fals I wyl neuer slee hym slepynge / For I wylle neuer destroye the hygh ordre of knyghthode / and therwith he departed ageyne And or he hadde ryden half a myle he retorned ageyne / and thoughte thenne to slee hem bothe / makynge the grettest sorou that euer man made / And whanne he came to the pauelions / he tayed his hors vnto a tree / and pulled oute his swerd naked in his hand / and wente to them there as they lay / and yet he thought it were shame to slee them slepynge / and layd the naked swerd ouerthwart bothe their throtes / and soo tooke his hors and rode his awaye

¶ And whanne syre Pelleas came to his pauelions he told his knyghtes and his squyers how he had sped / and sayd thus to them for your true and good seruyse ye haue done me I shall gyue you alle my goodes / for I wylle goo vnto my bedde and neuer aryse vntyl I am dede / And whan that I am dede / I charge yow that ye take the herte oute of my body and bere it her betwyxe two syluer dysshes / and telle her how I sawe her lye with the fals knyght Syr Gawayne / Ryght soo syr Pelleas vnarmed hym selfe and wente vnto his bedde makynge merueyllous dole and sorowe /

¶ Thenne syre Gawayne and Ettard awoke of her slepe / & fonde the naked swerd ouerthwart theire throtes / thenne she knewe wel it was syr Pelleas swerd / Allas sayd she to sir Gawayne ye haue bitrayed me and syr Pelleas bothe / for ye told me ye had slayne hym / and now I knowe wel it is not soo he is on lyue / And yf syre Pelleas had ben as vncurteis to yow as ye haue ben to hym ye hadde bene a dede knyghte / but ye haue deceyued me and bytrayd me falsly / that al ladyes and damoysels may beware by yow and me / And ther with syr gawayn made hym redy / and wente in to the forest / Soo it happed thenne that the damoysel of the lake Nymue mette with a knyghte of syr Pelleas that wente on his foote in the forest makyng grete dole / and she asked hym the cause And soo the woful knyghte told her how his mayster and Page  152 [leaf 76v] lorde was bitrayed thurgh a knyghte and a lady / and how he wyll neuer aryse oute of his bed tyl he be dede / Brynge me to hym sayd she anone / and I wyl waraunt his lyf he shal not dye for loue / and she that hath caused hym so to loue / she shalle be in as euyl plyte as he is or it be long to / for it is no Ioy of suche a prowde lady that wylle haue no mercy of suche a valyaunt knyght / anone that knyȝte broughte her vnto hym And whan she sawe hym lye in his bedde / she thoughte she sawe neuer so lykely a knyght / and ther with she threwe an enchauntement vpon hym / and he felle on slepe / And ther whyle she rode vnto the lady Ettard / and charged no man to awake hym tyl she came ageyne / Soo within two houres she broughte the lady Ettard thydder / and both ladyes fonde hym on slepe / loo sayd the damoysel of the lake ye oughte to be ashamed for to murdre suche a knyght / And therwith she threwe suche an enchauntement vpon her that she loued hym sore / that wel nyghe she was oute of her mynde / O lord Ihefu saide the lady Ettard / how is it befallen vnto me / that I loue now hym that I haue moost hated of ony man alyue / that is the ryght wys Iugement of god sayd the damoysel / And thenne anone syr Pelleas awaked and loked vpon Ettard / And whan he sawe her / he knewe her / & thēne he hated her more than ony woman alyue / and said awey traitresse come neuer in my syȝt And whan she herd hym say so / she wepte and made grete sorou oute of mesure

¶ Capitulum xxiiij

SYre knyghht Pelleas sayd the damoysel of the lake / take your hors / and come forthe with me oute of this countrey / and ye shal loue a lady that shal loue yow / I wylle wel said syr Pelleas / for this lady Ettard hath done me grete despyte and shame / and there he told her the begynnynge and endynge / And how he had purposed neuer to haue arysen tyll that he hadde ben dede / And now suche grace god hath sente me / that I hate her as moche as euer I loued her thanked be our lord Ihesus / Thanke me sayde the damoysel of the lake Page  153 [leaf 77r] anone syre Pellas armed hym and tooke his hors and commaunded his men to brynge after his pauelions and his stuffe where the damoysel of the lake wold assigne / soo the lady Ettard dyed for sorowe / and the damoysel of the lake reioysed syr Pellas and loued to gyders durynge their lyf dayes

¶ Capitulum xxv

NOw torne we vnto syr Marhaus that rode with the damoysel of xxx wynter of age southard / and soo they cam in to a depe forest / and by fortune they were nyȝted / and rode longe in a depe way / and at the last they came vnto the courtelage / and there they asked herborow / but the mā of the courtelage wold not lodge them for no treatyce that they coude treate / but thus moche the good man sayd / and ye will take the aduenture of youre lodgyng / I shal brynge you there ye shalle be lodged / what auenture is that that I shal haue / for my lodgynge sayd syr Marhaus / ye shalle wete whan ye come there sayd the good man / syr what auenture so it be bryng me thyder I pray the sayd syr Marhaus / for I am wery / my damoysel and my hors / So the good man wente and opened the gate / and within an houre he broughte hym vnto a fayre castel / and thenne the poure man called the porter / and anon he was lete in to the castel / & soo he told the lord how he brouȝt hym a knyght erraunt and a damoysel that wold be lodged with hym / lete hym in said the lord / it may happen he shalle repente that they toke their lodgyng here / So syr Marhaus was lete in with torche lyghte / and there was a goodely syghte of yonge men that welcomed hym / And thenne his hors was ledde in to the stable / and he and the damoysel were broughte in to the halle / and there stode a myghty duke and many goodely men about hym / thēne this lord asked hym what he hyghte / and fro whens he cam / and with whome he dwelt / syre he said I am a knyghte of kynge Arthurs and knyght of the table round / and my name is syre Marhaus / and borne I am in Irland / And thenne sayd the duke to hym / that me sore repenteth / the cause is this / for I loue not thy lord / nor Page  154 [leaf 77v] none of thy felawes of the table round / And therfor ease thy self this nyghte as wel as thow mayst / for as to morne I & my sixe sonnes shal matche with yow / Is ther no remedy but that I must haue a doo with yow and your vj sones at ones sayd syr Marhaus / No sayd the duke for this cause I maade myn auowe / for syr gawayne slewe my seuen sonnes in a recounter / therfore I made myn auowe / there shold neuer knyȝt of kynge Arthurs court lodge with me or come there as I myght haue adoo with hym / but that I wold haue a reuengyng of my sonnes dethe / what is your name said syr Marhaus I requyre yow telle me and it please yow / wete thow wel I am the duke of south marchys / A sayd sir Marhaus I haue herd saye that ye haue ben longe tyme a grete soo vnto my lord arthur and to this knyghtes / that shalle ye fele to morne said the duke / Shalle I haue adoo with yow sayd syr Marhaus / ye sayd the duke / therof shalt thow not chese / and therfore take yow to your chambre and ye shalle haue all that to yow longeth / So syr Marhaus departed and was led to a chamber / and his damoysel was led vnto her chamber / And on the morn the duke sente vnto syre Marhaus and bad make hym redy / And so syr Marhaus arose and armed hym / and thenne ther was a masse songe afore hym and brake his fast / and so moūted on horsback in the courte of the castel there they shold doo the batail / So ther was the duke al redy on horsbak clene armed and his syxe sonnes by hym / and eueryche had a spere in his hand / and soo they encountred where as the duke and his two sones brak theyr speres vpon hym / but sir Marhaus helde vp his spere and touched none of them /

¶ Capitulum xxvj

THenne cam the foure sones by couple / and two of them brake their speres / and soo dyd the other two / And alle this whyle syre marhaus touched hem not / Thenne sir marhaus ranne to the duke / and smote hym with his spere that hors and man felle to the erthe / And so he serued his sones / And thenne syr Marhaus alyghte doune and bad the dukePage  155 [leaf 78r] yelde hym or els he wold slee hym / And thenne some of his sones recouerd / and wold haue set vpon syr Marhaus / thenne syr Marhaus sayd to the duke seace thy sones or els I will doo the vttermest to yow all / Thenne the duke sawe he myghte not escape the deth he cryed to his sones and charged them to yelde them to syr Marhaus / And they kneled al doune / and put the pomels of theire swerdes to the knyght / and soo he receyued them / And thenne they halp vp their fader / and soo by their comynal assente promysed to syr Marhaus neuer to be foes vnto kynge Arthur / and therupon at whytsontyde after to come he and his sones and putte them in the kynges grace Thenne syr Marhaus departed and within two dayes his damoysel brought hym where as was a grete tornement that the lady de Vawse has cryed / And who that dyd best shold haue a ryche serklet of gold worthe a thousand besauntes / And there syr Marhaus dyd so nobly that he was renomed / & had somtyme doune fourty knyghtes / and soo the serklet of gold was rewarded hym / Thenne he departed fro them with grete worship / And soo within seuen nyghtes his damoysel brought hym to an erles place / his name was the erle Fergus / that after was syre Trystrams knyghte / and this Erle was but a yonge man / and late come in to his landes / and there was a gyant fast by hym that hyȝte Taulurd / and he had another broder in Cornewaille that hyghte Taulas that syr Trystram slewe whanne he was oute of hys mynde / So this Erle maade his complaynte vnto syre Marhaus that there was a gyaunt by hym that destroyed al his londes / & how he durst nowhere ryde nor goo for hym / Syr sayd the knyghte whether vseth he to fyghte on horsbak or on foote / nay sayd the erle there maye no hors bere hym / Wel said syr marhaus thenne wille I fyghte with hym on foote / Soo on the morne syr Marhaus prayd the erle that one of his men myghte brynge hym where as the gyaūt was / and so he was / for he sawe hym sytte vnder a tree of hoolly / and many clubbes of Iron and gysarms about hym Soo thys knyghte dressid hym to the gyant puttyng his sheld afore hym / and the gyant toke an Iron clubbe in his hande / & at the fyrste stroke he clafe syre Marhaus shelde in ij pyeces / And there he was in grete peryl / for the gyant was a wyly Page  156 [leaf 78v] fyghter / but atte last syr Marhaus smote of his ryght arme aboue the elbowe / thēne the gyant fledde and the knyght after hym / and soo he drofe hym in to a water / but the gyant was soo hyghe that he myghte not wade after hym / And thenne sir Marhaus made the erle Fergus man to fetche hym stones / & with tho stones the knyghte gaf the gyaunt many sore knockes / tyl at the last he made hym falle doune in to the water / & so was he there dede / thēne syr Marhaus wēte vnto the gyants castel / and there he delyuerd xxiiij ladyes and twelue knyȝtes oute of the gyants pryson / and there he had grete rychesse withoute nombre / soo that the dayes of his lys he was neuer poure man / thenne he retorned to the erle Fergus / the whiche thanked hym gretely / and wold haue gyuen hym half his lādes but he wold none take / Soo syr Marhaus dwellyd with the erle nyghe half a yere / for he was sore brysed with the gyaunt / and at the laste he took his leue / And as he rode by the way / he mette with syr gawayne and syr Vwayne / and so by aduenture he mette with foure knyghtes of Arthurs courte / the fyrst was syr Sagramore desyrus / syr Ozanna / syr Dodynas le saueage / and syre felot of lystynoyse / and there syr Marhaus with one spere smote doune these foure knyghtes / and hurte them sore / Soo he departed to mete at his day afore sette

¶ Capitulum xxvij

NOw tourne we vnto syr Vwāyne that rode westwarde with his damoysel of thre score wynter of age / and she broughte hym there as was a turnement nyghe the marche of walys / and at that tornement syre Vwayne smote doune xxx knyghtes / therfore was gyuen hym the pryse / and that was a gerfaukon / and a whyte stede trapped with clothe of gold / Soo thenne syr Vwayn dyd many straunge auentures by the meanes of the old damoysel / and so she broughte hym to a lady that was called the lady of the roche / the which was moche curtois / So there were in the countrey two knyȝtes that were bretheren / and they were called two peryllous knyghtes / the one knyghte hyght syre Edward of the reed castel / &Page  157 [leaf 79r] the other syr Hue of the reed castel / And these two bretheren had disheryted the lady of the roche of a Baronry of landes by their extorsion / And as this knyȝt was lodged with this lady she made her compleynt to hym of these two knyghtes / Madame sayd syr Vwayne / they are to blame / for they doo ageynst the hyghe ordre of knyghthode & the othe that they made / And yf hit lyke yow I wille speke with hem by cause I am a knyghte of kynge Arthurs / and I wylle entrete them with fayrenesse / And yf they wylle not I shalle doo bataille with them and in the deffense of youre ryghte / gramercy sayd the lady / and there as I maye not acquyte yow / god shalle / Soo on the morne the two knyghtes were sente for / that they shold come thyder to speke with the lady of the roche / and wete ye wel they fayled not / for they cam with an C hors / But whan this lady sawe them in this maner soo bygge / she wold not suffre syr Vwayne to goo oute to them vpon to surete ne for no fayr langage / but she made hym speke with them ouer a toure / but fynally these two bretheren wold not be entreated and ansuerd that they wold kepe that they had / wel said syr Vwayne / thenne wylle I fyghte with one of yow / and preue that ye doo this lady wronge / that wille we not said they For and we doo bataille we two wyl fyghte with one knyȝt at ones / and therfore yf ye wille fyghte soo we wille be redy at what houre ye wille assigne / And yf ye wynne vs in bataille the lady shal haue her landes ageyne / ye say wel sayd sir Vwayne / therfor make yow redy so that ye be here to morne in the defence of the ladyes ryght

¶ Capitulum xxviij

SO was there sykernesse made on both partyes that no treason shold be wrought on neyther partye / soo thenne the knyghtes departed and made hem redy / and that nyghte syr Vwayn had grete chere / And on the morne he arose erly and herd masse and brake his fast / and soo he rode vnto the playn withoute the gates where houed the two bretheren abydynge hym / Soo they rode to gyders passynge sore that syre Edward and syr Hue brake their speres vpon syr Vwayne Page  158 [leaf 79v] And syr Vwayne smote syre Edward that he felle ouer his hors and yet his spere brast not / And thenne he spored his hors and came upon syr Hue and ouerthrewe hym / but they soone recouerd and dressid their sheldes and drewe their suerdes and bad syre Vwayne alyghte and doo his bataill to the vttermest / Thenne syr Vwayn deuoyded his hors sodenly / & put his shelde afore hym and drewe his swerde / and soo they dressyd to gyders and eyther gaf other suche strokes / & there these two bretheren wounded syr Vwayne passyng greuously that the lady of the roche wende he shold haue dyed / And thus they fought to gyders fyue houres as men raged oute of reason / And at the laste syr Vwayne smote syre Edward vpon the helme suche a stroke that his swerd kerued vnto his canelbone / and thenne syr Hue abated his courage / but syr Vwayn pressed fast to haue slayne hym / That sawe syr Hue he kneled doune and yelde hym to syr Vwayne and he of his gentilnesse receyued his swerd and took hym by the hand & went in to the castel to gyders / thenne the lady of the roche was passyng glad and the other broder made grete sorowe for his broders dethe / thenne the lady was restored of al her landes / and syr Hue was commaunded to be at the Courte of kynge Arthur at the next feest of penthecost / So sir Vwayn dwelt with the lady nyghe half a yere / for it was longe or he myghte be hole of his grete hurtes / and soo whan it drewe nygh the terme day that syr gawayn syr Marhaus and syre Vwayne shold mete at the crosse way / thenne euery knyght drewe hym thyder to holde his promyse that they had made / & syr Marhaus and syr Vwayne broughte their damoysels with them / but sir Gawayn had lost his damoysel as it is afore reherced

Capitulum xxix

RYght soo at the twelue monethes ende they mette alle thre knyghtes at the fontayne and their damoisels but the damoysel that syr gawayn had coude saye but lytel worship of hym / soo they departed from the damoysels and roode Page  159 [leaf 80r] thurgh a grete forest / and there they mette with a messager that cam fro kynge Arthur that foughte them wel nyhe a xij moneth thorou oute al Englond / walys and Scotland / and charged yf euer he myght funde syre Gawayn and syre Vwayn to brynge hem to the courte ageyne / And thenne were they al gladde / and soo prayd they syre Marhaus to ryde with hem to the kynges courte / And soo within twelue dayes they cam to Camelot / and the kynge was passyng glad of their comynge and soo was alle the Courte / thenne the kyng made hem to swere vpon a book to telle hym alle theire aduentures that had befalle hem that twelue monethe and soo they dyd / And there was sir Marhaus wel knowen / for ther were knyghtes that he had matched afore tyme / and he was named one of the best knyghtes lyuyng / Ageyne the feest of pentecost cam the damoysel of the lake and broughte with hir syr Pelleas / and at that hyhe feest there was grete Iustynge of knyghtes / and of al knyghtes that were at that Iustes / syr Pelleas had the pryse / and syr Marhaus was named the next / but syr Pelleas was soo stronge / there myght but fewe knyghtes sytte hym a buffet with spere / And at that next feest sir pelleas and syr marhaus were made knyghtes of the table roūd For there were two seges voyde / for two knyghtes were slayn that twelue moneth / and grete ioye had kynge Arthur of sire Pelleas and of sire Marhaus / but Pelleas loued neuer after sire Gawayne but as he spared hym for the loue of kyng arthur / But oftymes at Iustes and turnementes sire Pelleas quyte sire Gawayn / for so it reherceth in the book of Frensshe / Soo sire Trystram many dayes after faughte with sire Marhaus in an yland / and there they dyd a grete bataylle / but at the last sire Trystram slewe hym / soo sire Trystram was woūded that vnnethe he myght recouer and lay at a nonnery halfe a yere / and sire Pelleas was a worshipful knyghte / & was one of the four that encheued the sancgreal / and the damoysel or the lake made by her meanes that neuer he had adoo with sire launcelot de lake / for where sire launcelot was at ony Iustes / or ony tornement / she wold not suffre hym be there that daye / but yf it were on the syde of sire launcelot / Page  160 [leaf 80v]

Explicit liber quartus

 

 

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