VIII

(Winchester f.187v-206v; Caxton IX.1-IX.22; Vinaver, Vol. 2, pp. 460.1-504.16; Shepherd pp. 280.1-306.40)

 
 
 
 

f. 187v (IX.1)

 

kynge Arthure Sir my name is Brwnor le noyre and

with in shorte space ye shall know Þat I am comyn of goode

kynne // hit may well be seyde sir kay the senesciall but in

mokkynge ye shall be called La cote Male tayle that is as

muche to sey the evyll shapyn cote hit is a grete thynge

that Þou askyste seyde Þe kynge // But for what cause weryst

Þou that ryche cote · hit is for som cause · sir he answerde I

had a fadir a noble knyght and as he rode an huntyng vp//

pon a day hit happed hym to ley hym downe to slepe & there

cam a knyght that had bene longe his enemy And whan

he saw he was faste on slepe he all to hew hym & thys

same cote had my fadir on that tyme And that makyth

this coote to sytte so evyll vppon me for the strokes be on

hit as I founde hit And neuer shall hit be a mendid for me

Thus to haue my fadyrs deth in remembraunce I were

this coote tyll I be revenged And be cause ye ar called Þe

moste nobelyst kynge of Þe worlde I com to you to ma//

ke me a knyght // Sir seyde sir Lamerok and Sir Gaheris

hit were well done to make humknyght for hym be se//

myth well of persone and of countenaunce Þat he shall preve

a good knyght and a myghty for sir and ye be remembird

evyn suche one was sir Launcelot whan he cam fyrst in

to this courte And full fewe of vs knew from whens

he cam & now is he preved the man of moste worshyp

in the worlde and all your cou^rte & rounde table is by sir

Launcelot worshypped and a mended more than by ony

knyght lyvynge That is trouthe seyde Þe kynge and to

morow at youre requeste I shall make hym knyght // so

on the morne Þer was an harte founden & thydir rode kyng

Arthure wyth a company of his knyghtes to sle Þat herte And

this yonge man Þat sir kay named La cote Male tayle was


f. 188 (IX. 1-2)

 

there leffte be hynde wyth quene Gwenyvere and by a

suddeyne adventure Þer was an horryble lyon kepte in a

towre of stoon and he brake lowse and cam hurlyng be

fore Þe quene and her knyghtes // And whan Þe quene sawe

the lyon she cryed oute and fledde and prayde hir knyghtes

to rescow her And Þer was non but ·xij· knyghtes Þat a bode

and all Þeer fledde // Than seyde La cote male tayle now

I se that all cowherde knyghtes be nat dede And Þer with all he

drew his swerde and dressed hym be fore Þe lyon And that

lyon gaped wyde and cam vppon hym rawmpyng to haue

slayne hym And he agayne smote hym in the myddys of

the hede that hit claff in sundir and so dayshed downe to

the erthe // And anone hit was tolde the quene how Þe yong

man Þat sir kay named La cote male tayle had slayne Þe lyon

And anone with Þat the kynge com home and the quene tolde

hym of that adventure he was well pleased and seyde

vppon payne of myne hede he shall preve a noble man

and faythefull and trewe of his promyse And so forthe

with all the kynge made hym knyght // Now sir seyde this

yonge knyght I requyre you and all the knyghtes of the

courte Þat ye calle me none oÞer name but La cote mele tay//

le In so muche Þat sir kay hath so named me so woll I be called

I assente me Þer to seyde the kynge And so the same day there

cam a damesell in to the courte and she brought wyth hir

a grete blacke shylde with a whyght honde in the myddis

holdynge a swerde and oÞer pyctoure was Þer none in that

shylde whan kynge Arthure saw her he asked her from

whens she cam and what she wolde Sir she seyde I haue

rydden longe and many a day with this shylde many way//

es And for this cause I am com to youre courte for there

was a good knyght that ought this shylde & this knyght


f. 188v (IX.2)

 

had vndir take a grete dede of armys to encheve hit and so

by mysse fortune an oÞer stronge knyght mette with hym by

suddeyne aventure And Þer they fought longe & aythir woun//

ded othir passynge sore And they were so wery Þat they lefft

Þat batayle on evyn honde // So this knyght Þat ought Þe

shylde sawe none oÞer way but he muste dye And than he

commaunded me to bere this shylde to the courte of kyng

Arthure he requyrynge & prayynge som good knyght

to take his shylde & that he wolde fulfylle Þe queste Þat he

was in // Now what sey ye to this queste seyde kynge

Arthure is there here ony of you that woll take vppon

you to welde this shylde Than was Þer nat one Þat wolde

speke a worde Than sir Kay toke Þe shylde in his hondis

and lyfft hit vp // Sir knyght seyde the damesell what

is your name // wete you well my name is sir Kay Þe senes//

ciall that wyde where is knowyn // Sir seyde Þat dame//

sell lay downe that shylde for wyte Þou well hit fallyth

nat for you for he muste be a bettir knyght than ye Þat

shall welde this chylde // Damesell seyde sir kay I toke

youre shylde nat to that entente But go who so go woll

for I woll nat go with you // Than the damesell stood styll

a grete whyle and be hylde many of the knyghtes // Þan

spake this yonge knyght lacote male tayle and seyde

fayre damesell I woll take this shylde and the adven//

ture vppon me // what and I wyste whothirward my

Jurney myght be for be cause I was this day made

knyght I wolde take this adventure vppon me what

is youre name fayre yonge man seyde Þe damesell

my name is he seyde la cote male tayle well may Þou

be callyd so seyde the damesell the knyght wyth Þe

evyll shapyn coote But and Þou be so hardty to take

 

 

 

                                    On the to


f. 189 (IX. 2-3)

 

on the to bare that shylde and to folowe me wete Þou well

thy skynne shall be as well hewyn as thy cote As for Þat

seyde sir la cote male tayle whan I am so hewyn I woll

aske you no salff to heale me with all // And forth with all Þer

com in to the courte ·ij·squyers and brouht hym grete

horsis and his armoure and spearys And a none he was

armed and toke his leve / Sir I woll nat seyde Þe kynge

be my wyll that ye toke vppon you this harde adventure     

Sir he seyde this adventure is myne and Þe fyrste that

euer I toke vppon and Þat woll I folow what som euer com of

me // Than Þat damesell departed And so sir La cote male tayle

faste folowed afftir And with in a whyle he ouer toke Þe dame//

sell and anone she mysse seyde hym in the fowlyst maner

Than sir Kay ordayned sir Dagonet kynge Arthurs foole

to folow aftire sir La cote male tayle and there Sir Kay

ordayned that Sir Dagonet was horsed and armed

and bade hym folow Sir La cote male tayle and profyr

hym to Juste and so he ded And whan he sawe La cote ma/

le tayle he cryed and bade make hym redy to Juste So sir

La cote male tayle smote sir Dagonet ovir his horse cou//

pyn Than the damesell mocked La cote male tayle and

sedye fye for shame now arte Þou shamed in kynge Arthurs

courte whan they sende a foole to haue a do with the & specially

at thy fyrste Justys Thus she rode longe and chydde //

And so with in a whyle there cam sir Bleoberys Þe good knyȝt

and Þer he Justed with sir La cote male tayle And there Syr

Bleoberys smote hym so sore that horse and all felle to      

the erthe Than sir Lacote male tayle a rose vp lyghtly &      

dressed his shylde & drew his sw^erde ^& a wolde haue done

batayle to the vttraunce for he was woode wroth Nat

so seyde sir Bleoberys de ganys as at this tyme I woll


 f. 189v (IX.3)

 

nat fyght vppon foote Than the damesell Maledysaunte        

rebuked hym in the fowleste maner and bade hym turne a            

gayne cowarde A damesell seyde he I pray you of mercy to       

mysse say me no more for my gryff is I now though ye gryff               

me no more yet I calle me neuer Þe worse knyght though a

marys sonne hath fayled me And also I counte my selff neuer

Þe worse man for a falle of sir Bleoberys So thus he rode

with her ·ij· dayes and by fortune Þer he encountred wytht sir

Palomydes the noble knyght and in Þe same wyse Sir

Palomydes served hym as ded sir Bleoberys to fore hon//

de Than seyde Þe damesell what doste Þou here in my felyship

for Þou canste nat sytte no knyght noÞer wythstonde hym one

buffette but yf hit were sir Dagonet A fayre damesell

I am nat the worse to take a falle of sir Palomydes and

yett grete dysworshyp haue I none for noÞer sir Bleoberys

noÞer yett sir Palomydes woll not fyght with me on foote // As

for that seyde Þe damesell wete you welle they haue disday//

ne and scorne to a lyght of Þer horsis to fyght with suche a lew//

de knyght at Þou arte So in the meane whyle Þer com Sir

Mordred sir Gawaynes broÞer and so he felle in felyshyp

with the damesell Maledysaunte And than they com be fore

the castell Orgulus and Þer was suche a custom that there

myght com no knyght by the castell but oÞer he muste Juste

othir be presonere othir at the leste to lose his horse & harney//

se and Þer cam oute ·ij· knyghtes a yenste them and sir Mordred

Justyd with the formyste and that knyght of Þe castell smote

Sir Mordred downe of his horse And than sir La cote male

tayle Justed with Þater and ayÞer of hem smote downe oÞer horsis

to the erthe And anone they a voyded Þer horsis and aythir of

hem toke othirs horses And than sir La cate male tayle ro//

de vnto that knyght Þat smote downe sir Mordred And there


f. 190 (IX. 3-4)

 

La cote male tayle wounded hym passynge sore and putte

hym frome his horse and lay as he had bene dede // So he

turned vnto hym that mette hym a fore And he toke the

flyght towarde Þe castell And sir Lacote male tayle rode

aftire hym Into the castell Orgulus and there sir Lacote

male tayle slew hym And anone Þer cam an C· knyghtys

a boute hym and all assayled hym And whan he sawe hys

horse sholde be slayne he a lyght and voyded his horse &

so put hym oute of Þe gate And whan he had so done he

hurled in a monge them and dressed his backe vntyll a

ladyes chambir wall Thynkynge hym selff Þat he hadde

leuer dye there with worshyp than to a byde Þe rebukes of the

damesell Maledysaunte and so in the meane tyme as he

stood & fought Þat lady Þat hylde that chambir wente oute

slyly at a posterne and with oute the gatys she founde sir

La cote male tayle his horse and lyghtly she gate hym by

the brydyll and tyed hym to the posterne // And than she yo//

de vnto her chambir slyly a gayne for to be holde how that

one knyght faught a yenst an ·C· knyghtes // And whan she

had be holde hym longe she wente to a wyndow be hynde

his backe and seyde Þou knyght that fyghtyst wondirly

well but for all that at the late Þou muste nedys dye

but yf Þou can thorow thy myghty provesse wynne vnto yon//

dir posterne for there haue I fastened Þer horse to a byde

the but wete Þou welle Þou muste thynke on thy worshyp

and thynke nat to dye for Þou mayste nat wynne vnto Þat

posterne with oute Þou do nobely and myghtyly // whan sir

La cote male tayle harde her sey so he gryped his swerde

in his honde and put his shylde fayre be fore hym And

thorow the thyckyst pres he thryled thorow // And whan he

cam to the porsterne he founde Þer redy ·iiij· knyghtes and at


f. 190v (IX.4)

 

ij· the fyrste strokys he slew ·ij· of the knyghtes and so he wanne

his horse and rode frome them And all hit was rehersed In

kynge Arthurs courte how he slew ·xij· knyghtes with in Þe castell

Orgulus and so he rode on his way // And in Þe meane why//

le the damesell sayde vnto sir Mordred I wene my foolyssh knyȝt

be othir slayne or takyn presonere And than were they ware

and saw hym com rydynge And whan he was com to them

he tolde all how he had spedde and escaped in Þe dispyte of all

the castell and som of the beste of hem woll telle no talys

Thow gabbyst falsely seyde the damesell that dare I make

good For as a foole and a dastarde to all knyghthode they

haue latte the passe // That may ye preve seyde Lacote ma//

le tayle with that she sente a corroure of hers that all way

rode with her And so he rode thydir lyghtly & spurred haw &

in what wyse that knyght ascaped oute of Þat castell // Than

all Þe knyghtes cursed hym and seyde he was a fende and no

man for he hath slayne here ·xij· of oure beste knyghtis

and we went this day that hit had bene to muche for sir

Trystrames de Lyones othir for sir Launcelot de lake and

in dyspyte and magre of vs all he is departed frome vs And

so hir curroure com a gayne and tolde Þe damesell all how

sir Lacote male tayle spedde at the castell Orgulus Than

she smote downe the hede and seyde but lytyll Be my hede

seyde sir Mordred to the damesell ye ar gretly to blame so

to rebuke hym for I warne you playnly he is a good knyȝt

and I doute nat but he shall preve a noble man but as

yette he may nat sytte sure on horse backe fore he Þat muste

be a good horse man hit muste com of vsage and excer//

cise but whan he commyth to the strokis of his swerde he

is than noble & myghty And sÞat  saw sir Bleoberys and sir

Palomydes for wete you well they were wyly men of


f. 191 (IX 4-5)

 

warre for they wolde know a none Whan they sye a yonge

man knyght by his rydynge how they were sure to gyffe

hym a falle frome his horse othir a grete buffett but fore Þe

moste party they wyll nat lyght on foote with yonge knyghtes for

they ar myghtyly & strongely armed For in lyke wyse Syr

Launcelot du lake whan he was fyrste made knyght he

was oftyn put to the worse on horse backe but euer vppon

foote he recouerde his renowne and slew and defowled ma//

ny knyghtes of the rounde table And Þer fore rebukes that

Sir Launcelot ded vnto many knyghtes causyth them to be

men of provesse to be ware for oftyn tyme I haue seyne

Þe olde preved knyghtes rebuked and slayne by them Þat were

but yonge be gynners Thus they rode sure talkyng by the

wey to gydyrs

¶Here this tale ouer lepyth a whyle vnto Sir Launcelott

That whan he was com to the courte of kynge Ar//

thure than harde he telle of the yonge knyghte

Sir Lacote male tayle how he slew the lyon & how he toke

vppon hym the adventures of the blacke shylde whyche

was named at Þat tyme the hardyest adventure of the

worlde So god me save seyde sir Launcelot vnto many of

his felowys hit was shame to all ^the good noble knyghtes to

suffir suche a yonge knyght to take so hyȝe adventure on

hym for his distruccion for I woll Þat ye wyte seyde Sir

Launcelot that this damesell Maledysaunte hath borne

that shylde many a day for to seche the moste preved knyghtes

And that was she Þat sir Breunys saunȝe pite toke the shylde

frome // And aftir sir Trystrames de Lyones rescowed that

shylde from hym and gaff hit to the damesell a gayne

A lytyll a fore that tyme that Sir Trystrames faught

with my nevew sir Blamoure de galys for a quarell Þat was


f. 191v (IX.5)

 

be twyxte the kynge of Irelonde and hym than many knyghtes were

sory that sir La cote male tayle was gone forth to that aduenture

Truly seyde sir Launcelot I caste me to ryde aftir hym and so with In

vij dayes sir Launcelot ouer toke sir La cote male tayle and Þan he salewed

hym and the damesell Maledysaunte And whan sir Mordred saw

Launcelot than he leffte Þer felyship and so sir Launcelot rode with hem

all a day and euer that damesell rebuked sir Lacote male tayle and

than sir Launcelot answerde for hym Than she leffte of & rebuked

than sir Launcelot So thys meane tyme sir Trystramys sente by a damesell

a lettir vnto sir Launcelot excusynge hym of the weddynge of Isod

Le blaunche maynes and seyde in the lettir as he was a trew knyȝt

he had neuer a do fleyshly with Isode Le blaunche maynys & passyng

curteysly and Jantely Sir Trystramis wrote vnto sir Launcelot euer be

sechynge hym to be hys good frende and vnto La beall Isod of Cor//

nwayle And that sir Launcelot wolde excuse hym if that euer he saw

her And with in shorte tyme by the grace of god sir Trystramys seyd

that he wolde speke with La beall Isode and with hym ryght hastyly

Than sir Launcelot departed frome the damesell and frome sir La cote

male tayle for to ouer se that letttir and to wryte anoÞer lettir vnto

sir Trystram And in the meane whyle sir La cote male tale rode with Þe

damesel· vntyll they cam to a castell that hyght Maledysaunte

Pendragon and there were vj knyghtes that stood a fore hym

and one of them profirde to fyght or to Juste with hym And so sir

La cote male tayle smote hym ouer hys hys horse croupe And Þan

the v· knyght sette vppon hym all at onys with Þer spearys and

there they smote Lacote male tay downe horse and man & than

they ded a lyght suddeynly and sette Þer hondis vppon hym all at

onys and toke hym presonere And on the morne sir Launcelot a

rose and delyuerde the damesel¸with lettirs vnto sir Trystram

and than he toke hys way aftir sir La cote male tayle and by the

way vppon a brydge there was a knyght that profirde sir Launcelotp


f. 193 (IX. 6-7)

 

hym and calld hym cowarde than she was passyng hevy //

So than they toke Þer horsis and rode forth a greate pace aftir

sir Launcelot And with in ij myle ther ouer toke hym & salewed

hym and thanked hym And anone the damesell cryed sir Laun//

celot mercy of hir evyll dede and seyyng for now I know ye ar Þe

floure of all knyghthode of the worlde and sir Trystram departe

hit even be twne you for god knowith be my good wyll seyde the

damesell that I haue sought you my lorde sir Launcelot and sir

Trystrams longe and now I thanke god I haue mette with you

and onys at Camelot I mette with sir Trystrams and Þer he rescowed

thys blacke shylde with the whyght honde holdyng a naked

swerde that sir Brewnys saunȝ pite had takyn frome me Now

fayre damesell seyde sir Launcelot who tolde you my name Sir

seyde she there cam a damesel· frome a knyght that ye fouȝt

with all at a brydge and she tolde that youre name was Sir

Launcelot du lake Blame haue she Þer fore seyde he But her

lorde sir Neroveus had tolde hir But damesell seyde sir Launclot

vppon thys covenaunte I woll ryde with you so that ye wyll nat

rebuke thys knyght sir Lacote male tayle no more for he ys a

good knyght and I doute nat but he shall preve a noble man

And for hys sake and pite that he sholde nat be destroyed I fo//

lowed hym to succour hym in thys grete nede A Jhu thanke

you seyde the damesell for now I woll sey vnto you and to hym

lothe I rebuked hym neuer for none hate Þat I hated hym but for

grete love that I had to hym for euer I supposed that he had bene

to yonge and to tendur of ayge to take vppon hym thys aventure

And there fore be my wyll I wolde haue dryvyn hym a way

for Jelosy that I had of hys lyff for hit may be no yonge knyȝtes

dede that shall enchyve thys aduenture to the ende parde seyd sir

Launcelot hit ys well seyde of you and where ye ar called the

damesel· Maledysaunt I woll calle you Þe damesell byeau parsaunte


f. 193v (IX.7)

 

and so they rode forth to gydirs a grete whyle vnto they cam vnto Þe

contreye of Surluse and there they founde a fayre vyllayge wyth

a stronge brydge lyke a fortresse And whan sir Launcelot & they

were at the brydge there sterte forthe a fore them of Jantill womes

men and yomen many that seyde Fayre lordis ye may nat passe

thys brydge and thys fortresse be cause of that blacke shylde Þat

I se one of youre beare and there fore Þer shall nat passe but

one of you at onys There fore chose you whych of you shall

entir with in thys brydge fyrst Than sir Launcelot profird hym

selfe firste to Juste & entir with In thys brydge // Sir seyde sir La//

cote male I be sech you to lette me entir with in thys fortresse and

if I may spede well I woll sende for you and if hit so be that I

be slayne there hit goth And if I be takyn presonere Þan may

you rescow me // Sir I am loth that ye sholde passe Þis passage

first seyde sir Launcelot // Sir seyde sir Lacote male tayle I pray you

lat me put my body in that aduenture Now go youre way  

seyde sir Launcelot and Jhu be youre spede // So he entird anone            

and there mette with hym ij brethirne the tone hyght Sir        

Playne de fors and that othir hyght sir Pyne de Amoris And         

anone they justed with sir Lacote male tayle and sirLacote male            

tayle smote downe sir Playne de fors and aftir he smote downe sir                

Playne de Amoris and than they dressed Þer shyldis and swerdys                 

and bade sir Lacote male tayle a lyght and so he ded and there was                  

daysshynge and foynynge with swerdis and so they be gan to

assayle othir full harde and they gaff sir Lacote male tayle many

grete woundis vppon hed and breste and vppon shuldirs And

as he mygh euer amonge he gaff sad strokis a gayne and Þan

the ij brethirne traced and traversed for to be of both hondis of sir

La cote male tale but he by fyne forse and knyghtly proves gate

hem a fore hym And whan he felte hym so wounded Þan he

doubled hys strokis and gaffe them so many woundis Þat he felde

hem to the erthe  and wolde haue slayne them had they nat


f. 194 (IX.7-8)

 

yelded them And ryght so sir Lacote male tayle toke the beste horse Þat Þer

was of them iij and so he rode forth hys way to the othir fortres

and brydge and there he mette with the thirde broÞer hys name was

sir Plenoryus a full noble knyght and there they Justed to gydirs

and aythir smote oÞer owne horse and man to the erthe And Þan

they avoyded Þer horsys and dressed Þer shyldis and swerdis and Þan

they gaff many sad strokis and one whyle the one knyght was

a fore on the brydge and anoÞer whyle the oÞer and Þus they faught

ij owres and more and neuer rested And euer sir Launcelot and the

damesell be hylde them A las seyde the damesell my knyght fyght

tyth passynge sore and ouer longe // Now may ye se seyde sir Launclot

that he ys a noble knyght for to considir hys firste batayle and his

grevous woundis And evyn forth with all so wounded as he ys

hit ys mervayle that he may endure thys longe thys longe batayle

with that good knyght Thys meane whyle sir La cote male tayle

sanke ryght downe vppon the erthe what for wounded and for

bled he myght nat stonde Than the tothir knyght had pyte off

hym and seyde fayre knyght dysmay you nat for had ye bene

freysshe whan ye mette with me as I was / I wote well that I coude

nat haue endured you And there fore youre nbole dedys of

armys I shall shew to you kyndenes and Jantilnes all that I may

And furthe with all thys noble knyght sir Plenoryus toke hym

vp in hys armys and ledde hym in to hys towre and Þan he com//    

maunded hym the wyne and made to serch hym & to stop hys ble  

dynge woundys // Sir seyde sir Lacote maltayle withdraw               

you from me and hyȝe you to yondir brydge a gayne for Þer woll

mete with you a noÞer maner a knyght Þan euer was // why seyde

sir Plenoryus ys there be hynde ony mo of youre felyship // ye sir

wyte you well there ys a muche bettir knyght Þan I am what

ys hys name seyde sir Plenoryus sir ye shall nat know for me

well seyde the knygt he shall be encountird with all what som


f. 194v (IX.8)

 

euer he be And anone he herde a knyght calle that seyde sir Plenoryus

where arte Þou othir Þou muste delyuer me that presoner Þat Þou haste

lad in to thy towre othir ellis com and do batayle with me Than sir

Plenoryus gate hys horse and cam with a speare in hys honde

waloppynge towarde sir Launcelot And than they be gan to feauter

theire spearys and cam to gydir as thundir and smote aythir

othir so myghtyly that Þer horsis felle downe vndir them And Þan

they avoyded Þer horsis and pulled oute Þer swerdis and lyke too

bullis they laysshed to gydirs with grete strokis and foynys //

But euer sir Launcelot recouerde grounde vppon hym and sir Pleno//

ryus traced to haue gone a boute hym But sir Launcelot wolde

nat suffir that but bare hym backer and backer tylle he cam nye

hys towre gate And than seyde sir Launcelot I know you well

for a good knyght but wyte Þou well thy lyff and deth ys in my

honde and there fore yelde the to me and thy presonere // But he

answerde no worde but strake myghtyly vppon sir Launcelotis

helme that the fyre sprange oute of hys helme that Þe fyre

sprange oute of hys yen Than sir Launcelot doubeled his strokes

so thycke and smote at hym so myghtyly that he made hym

knele vppon hys kneys And there with all sir Launcelot lepe

vppon hym and pulled hym grovelynge downe // Than sir Ple//

noryus yelded hym and hys towre and hys towre and all his

presoners at hys wylle Than sir Launcelot receyved hym and

toke hys trowthe And than he rode to the tothir brydge and

there sir Launclot iusted with othir iij of hys brethirn that one

hyȝt sir Pyllownes and the othir hyght sir Pellogres And the

thirde hyght sir Pelaundus and first vppon horse backe sir Launclot

smote hem doune and aftirwarde he bete them on foote and

made them to yelde them vnto hym And than he returned

a yen vnto sir Plenoryus and there he founde in hys preson

kynge Carados of scotlonde and many oÞer knyghtesand all they


f. 195 (IX. 8-9)

 

were delyuerde And than sir La cotemaletale cam to sir Launcelot and

than sir Launcelot wolde haue gyvyn hym all thys fortresse and Þe

brydges // Nay sir seyde Lacote male tayle I woll nat haue sir Pel Ple/

noryus lyvelode with that he wyll graunte you my lorde sir Launcelot

to com vnto kynge Arthurs house and to be hys knyght and all

hys brethirne I woll pray you my lorde to latte hym haue hys

lyvelode // I woll well seyde sir Launclot with thys that ye woll com to

the courte of kynge Arthure and by com hys man and his breÞern

v· And as for you sir Plenoryus I woll vndirtake seyde sir Launclot

at the nexte feste so there be a place voyde that ye shall be knyȝt

of the rounde table // Sir seyde sir Plenoryus at the nexte feste of

pentecoste I woll be at kynge Arthurs courte And at Þat tyme I

woll be gyded and ruled as kynge Arthure and ye woll haue

me Than sir Launcelot and sir La cote male tayle reposed Þem Þer

vntyll they were hole of hir woundis and there they had myry

chere and good reste and many good gamys and there were

many fayre ladys And so in the meane whyle cam sir Kay the

senesciall and sir Grandiles and anone they felyshipped with Þem

And so with In v· dayes they departed the knyghtes of kynge Arthurs

courte from thes fortres And as sir Launcelot com by the castell

of pendragon there he put sir Bryan de lese Iles frome his londes

for be cause he wolde neuer be withholde with kynge Arthur and

all the castell of pendragon and all the londis Þer of he gaff to

sir Lacote male tayle And than sir Launcelot sente for sir Neroveus

that he made onys knyght and he made hym to haue all Þe

rule of that castell and of that contrey vndir sir Lacote male/

tayle and so they rode vnto kynge Arthurs courte all hole to

gydirs and at pentecoste nexte folowynge there was sir Ple//

noryus and sir Lacote male tayle was called oÞer wyse be ryght

sir Brewne le noyre and bothe they were made knyghtes of the

rounde table and grete londis kynge Arthure gaff them


f. 195v (IX.9-10)

 

And there sir Breune le noyre wedded that damesell Maledysaunte

and aftir she was called the lady Byeaue vynante but euer aftir

for the more party he was called la cote male tayle and he preved

a passynge noble knyght and amyghty and many worshipfull

dedys he ded aftir in hys lyff And sir Plenoryus preved a good

knyght and was full of proves And all the dayes of theyre

lyff for the moste party they awayted vppon sir Launcelot and sir

Plenoryus brethirne were euer knyghtes of kynge Arthurs and

also as the freynshe booke makith mencion Sir La cote male

tayle revenged the deth of hys fadir

NOw leve we here sir Launcelot de lake and sir La cote male

tayle and turne we vnto sir Trystram de lyones Þat was

in bretayne // That whan la beall Isode vndirstood that he was

wedded she sente to hym by hir maydyn dame Brangwayn

pytevous lettirs as coude be thought and made and hir conclu//

syon was Þus That if hit pleased sir Trystram to com to hir

courte and brynge with hym Isode le blaunche maynys and they

shulde be kepte als well as her selff Than sir Trystram called

vnto hym sir Keyhydyus and asked hym wheÞer he wolde go with hym

in to Cornwayle secretely he answerde hym and seyde that he

was redy at all tymes and than he lete ordayne prevayly

a lityll vessell and there In they sayled sir Trystram sir Keyhy//

dyns and dame Brangwayne and Gouernayle sir Trystrams

squyar · So whan they were In the see a contraryyus wynde blew

them vnto the costis of North Walis ny the foreyste perelus

Than seyde sir Trystrames here shall ye a byde me thes x dayes

and gouernayle my squyer with you And if so be I com nat a

a gayne by that day take the nexte way in to Cornwayle

for In thys foreyste ar many strange aduentures as I

haue harde sey and som of hem I caste to preve or that I

departe and whan I may I shall hyȝe me aftir you Than sir


f. 196 (IX.10)

 

Trystrams and sir Keyhydyns toke Þer horsis and departed frome there

felyship and so they rode with In that foreyste a myle and more

And at the laste sir Trystramys saw be fore them a lykely knyght

syttynge armed by a well and a stronge myghty horse stood passyng

nyȝe hym I tyed to an Ok and aman hovyng and rydynge by

hym ledynge an horse lode with spearys And thys knyght that

sate at the well semyd by his countenaunce to be passyng hevy

Than sir Trystramys rode nere hym and seyde fayre knyght why

sitte you so droupynge ye seme to be a knyght arraunte by youre

armys and harneys and there fore dress you to Juste with one of

of vs oÞer with bothe // There with all that knyght made no wordes

but toke hys shylde and buckeled hit a boute hys necke & lyghtly

he toke hys horse and lepte vppon hym and than he toke a grete

speare of hys squyre and departed hys way a furlonge Than sir

Keyhydyns asked leve of sir Trystrames to Juste firste // Sir do yo beste

seyde sir Trystrames So they mette to gydirs and there sir Keyhydins

had a falle and was sore wounded an hyȝe a bovyn the pappis

Than sir Trystramys seyde knyght that ys well Justed now make

you redy vnto me // Sir I am redy seyde the knyght And anone

he toke a grete speare and encountird with sir Trystramys ·

and there by fortune and by grete force that knyght smote

downe sir Trystramys frome hys horse and had a grete falle

Than sir Trystram was sore a shamed and lyghtly he avoyded

hys horse and put hys shylde a fore hys shulder and drew

hys swerde // And than sir Trystramys requyred that knyght of

hys knyghthode to a lyȝte vppon foote and fyght with hym // I

woll well seyde the knyght and so he a lyght vppon foote and

a voyded hys horse and kest hys shylde vppon hys shuldir and

drew oute hys swerde and there they fought a longe batayle

to gydirs nyȝe ij owrys · Than sir Trystramys seyde fayre

knyght holde thyne honde a lityll whyle and telle me of whens


f. 196v (IX.10-12)

 

Þou arte and what ys thy name As for that seyde the knyght I woll

be a vysed but and ye woll telle me youre name paradventure I woll

telle you myne // Now fayre knyght he seyde my name ys sir Trys//

tram de lyones sir and my name ys sir Lamerok de galys A sir La//

merok seyde sir Trystram well be we mette and be thynke the now

of the despite Þou dedist me of the sendynge of the horne vnto

kynge Markis courte to the entente to haue slayne or dishonourde

my lady quene la beall Isode And there fore wyte Þou well seyde

sir Trystramys the tone of vs ij shall dy or we departe // Sir seyde

sir Lamerok that tyme Þat we were to gydirs in the Ile of seruayge

ye promysed me bettir frendeship So sir Trystramys wolde make

no lenger delayes but laysshed at sir Lamerok and thus they    

faught longe tylle athir were wery of oÞer Than sir Trystrams 

seyde vnto sir Lamorak in all my lyff mette I neuer with such a knyȝt      

that was so bygge and so well brethed There fore sayde sir Trys//         

tramys hit were pite that ony of vs bothe sholde here be mys//            

cheved Sir seyde sir Lamerok for youre renowne and your nam                

I woll that ye haue the worship and Þer fore I woll yelde me vn                 

to you And there with he toke the poynte of hys swerde in hys                    

honde to yelde hym Nay seyde sir Trystrames ye shall nat do so                    

for well I know youre profirs and more of your Jantilnes Þan                   

for ony feare or drede ye haue of me And there with all Sir                        

Trystramys profferde hym hys swerde and seyde sir Lamerak

as an ouer com knyght I yelde me to you as a man of moste

noble proves that I euer mette // Nay seyde sir Lamerok I woll do

you Jantylnes · I requyre you lat vs be sworne to gydirs Þat neuer

none of vs shall aftir thys day haue a do wither And Þer with all

Sir Trystrames and sir Lamorak sware that neuer none of hem sholde

fyght a gaynste othir for woll noÞer for woo And thys meane

lywhyle cam sir Palomydes the good knyght folowyng Þe questyng

 

 

 

 

                                                                  beste Þat had


f. 197 (IX.12)

 

beste that had in shap lyke a serpentis hede and a body lyke a lybud

buttokked lyke a lyon and footed lyke an harte And In hys body

there was such a noyse as hit had bene xxti couple of houndys

questynge and suche noyse that beste made where som euer he

wente And thys beste euer more sir Palomydes folowed for hit

was called hys queste And ryght so as he folowed this beste

hit cam by sir Trystram and son aftir cam sir Palomydes

and to breff thys mater he smote downe sir Trystramys and

sir Lamorak bothe with one speare and so he departed aftir Þe beste

glatyssaunte that was calld the questynge beste where fore

thes ij knyghtes were passynge wrothe that sir Palomydes wold

nat fyght with hem on foote // Here men may vndirstonde Þat

bene men of worshyp that man was neuer fourmed that all

tymes myght attayne but som tyme he was put to the worse

by male fortune and at som tyme the wayker knyght put Þe

byggar knyght to a rebuke Than sir Trystrams and sir Lame//

rok gat sir kayhydyns vppon a shylde be twyxte them bothe &

led hym to fosters lodge and there they gaff hym in charge

to kepe hym well and with hym they a bode iij dayes Than

thes ij knyghtes toke Þer horsys and at a crosse they departed And

than seyde sir Trystramys to sir Lamorak I requyre you if ye hap

to mete with sir Palomydes say to hym that he shall fynde

me at the same welle there we mette to fore And there sir Trys

tramys shall preve wheÞer he be bettir knyght than I and so ayÞer

departed frome othir a sondry way and sir Trystramys yode nyȝe

there as was sir keyhydyns and sir Lamorak rode vntyll he com

to a chapell and there he put hys horse vnto pasture And

a none Þer cam sir Mellyagaunte that was kynge Bagdemagus

sonne and he there put hys horse to pasture and was nat

ware of sir Lamerok and Þan thys knyght sir Mellyagaunte


f. 197v (IX.12-13)

 

made hys mone of the love that he had to quene Gwenyuer and

there he made a wofull complaynte All thys harde sir Lamorak

and on the morne sir Lamorake toke hys horse and rode vnto the

foreyste and there he mette with ij knyghtes hovyng vndir the

wood shaw Fayre knyghtes seyde sir Lamerok what do ye hovyng

here and wacchynge and yff ye be knyghtes arraunte Þat wyll

Juste lo I am redy Nay sir knyght they seyde we a byde nat here

for to Juste with you but we lye in a wayte vppon a knyght

that slew oure brothir // what knyght was that seyde sir Lamo//

rak that ye wolde mete with all // Sir they seyde hit ys sir Launce//

lot that we woll sleee and he com thys way ye take vppon you

a grete charge seyde sir Lamorake for sir Launcelot ys a noble

proved knyght // As for that sir we doute nat for Þer ys none of

vs but we ar good I nowȝe for hym I woll nat be leve Þat seyde

sir Lamerok for I harde neuer yet of no knyght dayes of oure

lyff but sir Launcelot was to bygge for hym Ryght as they

talked sir Lameroke was ware How sir Launcelot com rydynge

streyte towarde them Than sir Lamorak salewed hym and he

hym a gayne And than sir Lamorak asked sir Launcelot if Þer

were ony thynge that he myght do for hym in thys marchis

Nay seyde sir Launcelot nat at thys tyme I thanke you Than ayÞer

departed from oÞer and sir Lamorake rode a yen there as he leffte

the ij knyghtes and than he founde them hydde in the leved

woode // Fye on you seyde sir Lamerak false cowardis that pite

and shame Hit ys that ony of you sholde take the hyȝe order

of knyghthode // So sir Lamerok departed fro them And with In a

whyle he mette with sir Mellyagaunce And Þan sir Lamorak asked

hym why he loved quene Gwenyuer as he ded for I was nat far

frome you whan ye made youre complaynte by the chapell

Ded ye so seyde sir Mellyaguance than woll I a byde by hit I


f. 198 (IX.13-14)

 

loue quene Gwenyuer what woll ye with hit I woll preve and make

hit good that she ys the faryste lady and moste of beaute in the

worlde // As to that seyde sir Lamerok I say nay Þer to for quene Mor//

gause of Orkeney modir vnto sir Gawayne for she ys the fayryst

lady that beryth the lyff That ys nat so seyde sir Mellyagaunce

and that woll I preve with my hondis // wylle ye so seyde sir Lamorak

and in a bettir quarell kepe I nat to fyght So they departed frome

othir in grete wrathe and than they com rydyng to gydir as

hit had bene thundir and aythir smote oÞer so sore that Þer horsis

felle backwarde to the erthe and than they avoyded Þer horsys

and dressed Þer shyldis and drew Þer swerdis and than they hureled

to gydirs as wylde borys and thus they fought a grete whyle

For sir Mellyagaunce was a good man and of grete myght but

sir Lamorak was harde byg for hym and put hym all wayes a

backe but aythir had wounded othir sore And as they stood thus

fyghtynge by Fortune com sir Launcelot and sir Bleoberys And

than sir Launcelot rode be twyxte them and asked them for what

cause they fought so to gydirs and ye ar bothe of the courte of

kynge Arthure Sir seyde sir Mellyagaunce I shall telle you for

what cause we do thys batayle I praysed my lady quene Gweny//

uere and seyde she was the fayrytste lady of the worlde And sir

Lameroke seyde nay Þer to for he seyde quene Morgause of orkeney

was fayrar than she and more of beaute // A seyde sir Lamorak

why sayst Þou so hit ys nat thy parte to disprayse thy prynces that Þou

arte vndir obeysaunce and we all // And there with all sir Launclot

alyght on foote and there fore make the redy for I woll preve

vppon the that quene Gwenyuer ys the fayryst lady and moste of

bounte in the worlde Sir seyde sir Lamerok I am lothe to haue a

do with you in thys quarell for euery man thynkith hys owne

lady fayryste and thouȝe I prayse the lady that I love moste ye


f. 198v (IX.14-15)

 

sholde nat be wrothe  for thouȝe my lady quene Gwenyuer be fayryst

in youre eye wyte you well quene Morgause of Orkeney ys fay//

ryst in myne eye and so euery knyght thynkith hys owne lady

fayryste And wyte you well sir ye ar the man in the worlde

excepte sir Trystramys that I am moste lothyst to haue a do with

all But and ye woll nedys haue a do with me I shall endure

you as longe as I may // Than spake sir Bleoberys and seyde my

lorde sir Launcelot I wyste you euer so mysse aduysed as ye be

at thys tyme for sir Lamerok seyth to you but reson & knyghtly

for I warne you I haue a lady and me thynkith that she ys

the fayryst lady of the worlde // Were thys a grete reson Þat ye

sholde be wrothe with me for such · langage // And well ye wote

that sir Lamorak ys a noble knyght as I know ony lyvynge

and he hath ouȝte you and all vs euer good wyll there fore I pray

you be fryndis Than sir Launcelot seyde I pray you for gyve

me myne offence and evyll wyll and if I was mysseaduysed

I woll make amendis / Sir seyde sir Lamerok the or endis ys sone

made be twyxte you and me And so sir Launcelot and sir Bleo//

berys departed and sir Lamerok and sir Mellyagaunce toke Þer horsis

and aythir departed frome othir And with In a whyle cam kyng

Arthure and mette with sir Lamorak and Justed with hym and Þer

he smote downe sir Lamorak and wounded hym sore with a spere

and so he rode frome hym where fore sir Lamerok was wroth

that he wolde nat fyght with hym on foote how be hit that

sir Lamerok knew nat kynge ARthure

NOw levith of thys tale and speketh of sir Trystramys

that as he rode he mette with sir Kay the senescyall

and there sir Kay asked sir Trystramys of what contrey he was

he answerde and seyde he was of the contrey of Cornwaile

Hit may well be seyde sir Kay for as yet harde I neuer Þat ever


f. 199 (IX.15)

 

good knyght com oute of Cornwayle That ys well spokyn

seyde sir Trystram But and hit please you to telle me your name

I pray you Sir wyte you well that my name ys sir Kay Þe senes//

ciall A sir ys that youre name seyde sir Trystramys now wyte

you well that ye ar named the shamefullyst knyght of your

tunge that now ys lyvynge how be hit ye ar called a good

knyght but ye ar called vnfortunate and passyng ouerthwart

of youre tunge and thus they rode to gydirs tylle they cam to

a brydge And there was a knyght that wolde nat latte them

passe tylle one of them Justed with hym And so that knyght

Justed with sir kay and therehe gaff sir Kay a falle and hys name

was sir Tor sir Lamerok halff brothir and than they ij rode to

Þer lodgynge and there they founde sir Brandiles and sir Tor

cam thydir anone aftir And as they sate at hir souper Þes iiij

knyghtes iij of them spake all the shame by Cornysh knyȝtes

that coude be seyde Sir Trystramys harde all that they seyde

and seyde but lytyll but he thought the more but at that tyme

he discouerde nat hys name And vppon the morne sir Trystrams

toke hys horse and a bode them vppon Þer way And Þer sir Brandiles

profirde to Juste with sir Trystram and Þer sir Trystram smote hym

downe and horse and all to the erthe Than sir Tor le fyȝe de

vaysshoure he encountird with sir Trystram and Þer sir Trystram

smote hym downe and than he rode hys way and sir Kay fo//

lowed hym but he wolde none of hys felyship Than sir Bran//

diles com to sir Kay and seyde I wolde wyte fayne what ys that

knyghtes name Com one with me seyde sir Kay · and we shall pray

hym to telle vs hys name So they rode to gydirs tyll Þey com

nyȝe hym and than they were ware where he sate by a well

and had put of hys helme to drynke at the welle And whan

that he saw them com he laced on hys helme lyghtly and toke


f. 200v (IX.16-17)

 

hys horse to profir hem to Juste Nay seyde sir Brandyles we Justed

late I nowe with you but we com nat in that entente But we re//

quyre you of knyghthod to telle vs youre name My fayre lordys

sitthyn that hit ys youre and now for to please you ye shall wyte

that my name ys sir Trystram de lyones nevew vnto kyng Mark

of Cornwayle In good tyme seyde sir Brandiles and well be ye foun/

dyn and wyte you well that we be ryght glad that we haue

founde you and we be of a felyship that wolde be ryght glad

of youre company for ye ar the knyght in the worlde that the

felyship of the rounde table desyryth moste to haue the company

off // God thanke them all seyde sir Trystram of hir grete goodnes

But as yet I fele well that I am nat able to be of Þer felyship

for I was neuer yet of such dedys of worthynes to be in Þe compa//

nye of such a felyship // A seyde sir Kay and ye be sir Trystrams

ye ar the man called now moste of proves excepte sir Launcelot

for he beryth nat the lyff crystynde noÞer hethynde that canne

fynde such a nothir knyght to speke of hys proves and of his

hondis and hys trouthe with all for yet cowde Þer neuer createre

sey hym dishonoure and make hit good Thus they talked a

grete whyle and than they departed ayÞer frome oÞer such wayes

as hem semed beste Now shall ye here what was the cause

that kyng Arthure cam in to the foreyste perelous that was In

north walis by the meanys of a lady her name was Aunowre

And thys lady cam to kynge Arthure at Cardyeff and she

by fayre promyses and fayre behestis made kynge Arthure to

ryde with her in that foreyste perlous and she was a grete

sorseres and many dayes she had loved kynge Arthure

and by cause she wolde haue had hym to lye by her she cam

in to that conrey So whan the Kynge was gone with hir

many of hys knyghtes folowed aftir hym whan they mysce

hym as sir Launcelot sir Brandiles and many oÞer And whan 


f. 201 (IX.17)

 

where they leffte dame Brangwayne And Gouernayle and so

they sayled in to Cornwayle all hole to gydirs and by assente

and by enformacion of dame Brangwayne whan they were

londed they rode vnto sir Dynas the senesciall a trusty frynde of

sir Trystramys And so sir Dynas and dame Brangwayne

rode to the courte of kynge Marke and tolde the quene la beall

Isode that sir Trystramys was nyȝe hir in the contrey Than

for verry pure Joy la beall Isode sowned And whan she myȝt

speke she seyde Jantyll senesciall helpe that I myght speke with

hym othir my harte woll braste Than sir Dynas & dame

Brangwayne brought sir Trystram and sir Keyhydyns previly

in to the courte vnto her chambir where as labeall Isode

assygned them and to telle the Joyes that were be twyxte

la beall Isode and sir Trystramys there ys no maker can make

hit nothir no harte can thynke hit noÞer no penne can wryte

hit noÞer no mowth can speke hit / And as the freynshe booke

makith makith mension at the firste tyme that euer sir Keyhidins

saw la beall Isode he was so enamered vppon hir Þat for very

pure love he myght neuer with draw hit and at the laste as

ye shall hyre or the booke be ended sir Keyhydyns dyed for Þe love

of Isode and than pryvaly he wrote vnto her lettirs & baladis

of the moste goodlyeste that were vsed in Þo dayes And whan

labeall Isode vndirstood hys lettirs she had pite of hys com//

playnte and vnavised she wrote a noÞer lettir to comforte

hym with all And sir Trystram was all thys whyle in a

turret at the commaundemente of la beall Isode And whan she

myght she yeode and come to sir Trystram So on a day kynge

Marke played at the Chesse vndir a chambir wyndowe

and at that tyme sir Trystramys and sir Keyhydyns were with

in the chambir ouer kynge Marke & as hit myshapped sir Trystrams


f. 201v (IX.17-18)

 

founde the lettir that sir Keyhydyns sente vnto la beall Isode // Also

he had founde the lettir that she had sente vnto sir Keyhydyns and

at athe same tyme la beall Isode was in the same chambir Than

sir Trystramys com vnto la beall Isode and seyde madame here

ys a lettir that was sente vnto you and here ys the lettir that

ye sente vnto hym that sente you that lettir // Alas madame

the good love that I haue lovyd you and many londis and grete

rychesse haue I for sakyn for youre love and now ye ar a traytours

vnto me whych dothe me grete payne But as for the sir Key/

hydyns I brought the oute of Bretayne in to thys contrey &

thy fadir kynge Howell I wan hys londis how be hit I

wedded thy syster Isode le blaunche maynes for the goodnes

she ded vnto me and yet as I am a trew knyght she ys

a clene maydyn for me // But wyte Þou well sir Keyhydyns

for thys falshed and treson Þou hast done vnto me I woll

revenge hit vppon the And there with all sir Trystram drew

his swerde and seyde sir Keyhidyns kepe the And than labeall Isode

sowned to the erthe And whan sir Keyhydyns saw sir Trystrams

com vppon hym he saw none oÞer boote but lepte oute at a bay

wyndow evyn ouer the hede where sate kynge Marke play

yng at the chesse And whan the kynge saw one com hur//

lyng ouer hys hede he seyde felow what arte Þou and what

ys the cause Þou lepe oute at that wyndow My lorde kynge

seyde sir Keyhydyns hit fortuned me that I was a slepe in the

wyndow a bovyn youre hede and as I slepte I slumbirde

and so I felle downe // Thus sir Keyhydyns excused hym and

sir Trystram drad hym leste he were discouede vnto the kynge

that he was there where fore he drew hym to the strength

of the towre and armed hym in such armour as he had for to

fyght with hem that wolde with stonde hym And so whan


f. 202 (IX.18)

 

sir Trystram saw that there was no resistence a gaynste hym

he sente Gouernayle for hys horse and hys speare & knyghtly

he rode forth oute of the castell opynly that was called Þe castell

of Tyntagyll and evyn at the gate he mette with sir Gyngalyn

Gawaynes sonne and anone sir Gyngalyn put hys speare in Þe

reste and ran vpponsir Trystram and brake hys speare And

sir Trystram at that tyme had but a swerde and gaff hym

suche a buffet vppon the helme that he fylle downe frome hys

sadill and hys swerde slode a downe and carved a sundir his

horse necke And so sir Trystramys rode hys way in to Þe foreyste

And all thys doynge saw kynge Marke and than he sente a

squyer vnto the hurte knyght and commanded hym to com

to hym and so he ded And whan kynge Marke wyst Þat hyt

was sir Gyngalyn he well commyd hym and gaff hym a nothir

horse And so he asked hym what knyght was that encoun//

turde with hym Sir seyde sir Gyngalyn I wote nat what knyȝt

hit was · But well I wote he syeth · and makith grete dole

Than sir Trystrames with In a whyle mette with a knyght of

hys owne hys name was sir Fergus And whan he had mette

with hym he made such sorow that he felle downe of hys horse

in a sowne and in such sorow he was Inne iij· dayes and iij

nyghtes Than at the laste sir Trystramys sente vnto the courte

by sir Fergus for to spurre what tydyngis And so as he rode by

the way he mette with a damesell that com frome sir Palo//

mydes to know and seke how sir Trystramys ded Than Sir

Fergus tolde her how he was all moste oute of hys minde

A las seyde the damesell where shall I fynde hym // In suche

a place seyde sir Fergus Than sir Fergus founde quene Isode

syke in hir bedde makynge the grettyste dole that euer ony erthly

woman made And whan the damesell founde sir Trystramys


f. 202v (IX.18)

 

she made grete dole by cause she myght nat a mende hym for Þe

more she made of hym the more was hys payne And at the

laste sir Trystram toke hys horse and rode a wey frome her

and than was hit iij dayes or that she coude fynde hym and

than she broute hym mete and drynke but he wolde none And

than anoÞer tyme sir Trystramys ascaped a way frome Þe dame//

sell and hit happened hym to ryde by the same castell where

sir Palomydes and sir Trystramys dyd batayle whan la beale

Isode departed them and there by fortune the damesell mette

with sir Trystramys a yen makynge the grettiste dole that

euer erthely creature made and she yode to the lady of that

castell and tolde of the myssaduenture of sir Trystrames

Alas seyde the lady of that castell where ys my lorde Sir

Trystramys // Ryght here by youre castell seyde Þe dame//

sell In good tyme seyde the lady ys he so nyȝe me he shall

haue mete and drynke of the beste And an harpe I haue

of hys where vppon he taught me for of goodly harpyng

he beryth the pryse of the hir worlde So thys lady & dame//

sell brought hym mete and drynke but he ete lityll Þer off

Than vppon anyght he put hys horse frome hym And

vnlaced hys armour And so he yeode vnto the wyldirnes

and braste downe the treys and bowis And othir whyle

whan he founde the harpe that the lady sente hym Than

wolde he harpe and play Þer vppon and wepe to gydirs

And som tyme whan he was in the wood the lady wyst

nat where he was Than wolde she sette hir downe and

play vppon the harpe And anone sir Trystramys wolde

com to the harpe and harkyn Þer to And som tyme he wolde

harpe hym selff Thus he there endured a quarter off a

yere And so at the laste he ran hys way and she wyst


f. 203 (IX.18-19)

 

nat where he was be com and than was he naked & waxed

leane poore of fleyshe and so he felle in the felyshyppe of

herde men and shyperdis and dayly they wolde gyff hyn

som of Þer mete and drynke And whan he ded ony shrewde

dede they wolde beate hym with roddis and so they clypped

hym with sherys and made hym lyke a foole // And so vppon a

day sir Dagonet kynge Arthurs foole cam In to Cornwayle with

ij squyers with hym and as they rode thorow that foreyste they

cam by A fayre welle where sir Trystramys was wonte to be &

the weddir was hote and they a lyȝt to drynke of that welle &

in the meane whyle theyre horsys brake lowse Ryght so cam

sir Trystramys vnto them And firste he sowsed sir Dagonet

in that welle and aftir that his squyars And there at lowȝe

the shypperdis and furth with all he ran aftir Þer horsis and brouȝt

hem a gayne one by one and ryght so wete as they were he

made them lepe vp and ryde Þer wayes Thus sir Trystramys en//

dured there an halff yere naked and wolde neuer com in towne

So the meane whyle the damesell that sir Palomydes sent to

seke sir Trystram she yode vnto sir Palomydes and tolde hym off

all the myschyff that sir Trystram endured Alas seyde sir Palo//

mydes hit ys grete pite that euer so noble a knyght sholde be so

myscheved for the love of a lady But neuertheles I woll go and

seke hym and comforte hym and I may Than a lytyll be fore

that tyme la beall Isode had commaunded sir Kayhydyns oute of

the contrey of Cornwayle So sir Keyhydyns departed with a dolerous

harte and by aventure he mette with sir Palomydes and they

felyshyppyd to gydirs and aythir complayned to oÞer of there hote

love that they loved la beall Isode Now lat vs seyde sir Palo//

mydes seke sir Trystramys that lovyth her as well as we And

let vs preve wheÞer we may recouer hym So they rode in to Þe


f. 203v (IX.19)

 

foreyste and iij dayes and iij nyghtes they wolde neuer take lodgynge

but euer souȝt sir Trystram and vppon a tyme by aduenture they

mette with kynge Marke that was rydden frome hys men all

a lone And whan they saw hym sir Palomydes knew hym

but sir Keyhydyns knew hym nat A false knyght seyde sir Pa//

lomydes hit ys pite Þou haste thy lyff for Þou arte a destroyer

of all worshipfull knyghtes and by thy myschyff and thy vengeaunce

Þou haste destroyed that moste noble knyght sir Trystramys de

lyones and there fore deffende the seyde sir Palomydes for Þou shalt

dye thys day That were shame seyde kynge Marke for ye too ar

armed and I am vnarmed As for that seyde sir Palomydes

I shall fynde a remedy there fore here ys a knyght with me and

Þou shalt haue hys harneyse Nay seyde kynge Marke I woll

nat haue a do with you for cause haue ye none to me Fr

all the mysse ease that sir Trystramys hath was for a lettir Þat

he founde for as for me I ded to hym no displesure And god

knowith I am full sory for hys maledye and hys myssease

So whan the kynge had thus excused hym selff they were

fryndys and kynge Mark wolde haue had them vnto the

castell of Tyntagyll But sir Palomydes wolde nat but tur//

ned vnto the realme of logrys And sir Keyhydyns seyde that he

wolde in to Bretayne // Now turne we vnto sir Dagonet a yen

that whan he and hys squyers were vppon horse backe he

demyd that the shyperdis had sente that foole to aray hem so

by cause that they lawȝed at them and so they rode vnto the 

kepers of the bestis and all to bete them // whan sir Trystramys

saw hem betyn that were wonte to gyff th hym mete he

ran thydir and gate sir Dagonet by the hede and Þer he gaff

hym such a falle to the erthe and brusede hym so that he lay//

stylle and them he wraste hys swerde oute of hys honde


f. 204 (IX.19-20)

 

and there with he was to one of hys squyers and smote of hys hede//

and hys othir sqy squyer fled And so sir Trystramys toke his

way with the swerde in hys honde rennynge as he had bene wyld

woode // Than sir Dagonet rode to kynge Marke and tolde hym

how he had spedde in the foreyste and there fore seyde sir Dago//

net be ware kynge Marke that Þou com nat a boute that well

in the foreyste for there ys a foole naked And that foole & I foole

mette to gydir and he had all moste slayne me // A seyde kynge

Marke that ys sir Matto le Breune that felle oute of hys wytte

be cause he loste hys lady For whan sir Gaherys smote downe

sir Matto and wan hys lady of hym neuer syns was he in his

mynde and that was grete pite for was a good knyght //

Than sir Andred that was Cousyn vnto sir Trystram made a lady

that was hys paramour to sey and to noyse hit that she was with sir

Trystramys or euer he dyed and thys tale she brouȝt vnto kynge

Markis house that she buryed hym by a welle and that or he dyed

he be souȝte kynge Marke to make hys Cousyn sir Andred kynge

of the contrey of Lyonas of the whych sir Trystramys was lorde

of And all thys ded sir Andred by cause he wolde haue had Sir

Trystramys londis And whan kynge Mark harde telle Þat

sir Trystrames was dede he wepte and made grete dole But whan

que^ne Isode harde of thes tydyngis she made such sorow that she

was nyȝe oute of hir mynde and so vppon a day she thouȝt to

sle hir selff and neuer the to lyve aftir the deth of sir Trystramys

and so vppon a day Labeall Isode gate a swerde pryvayly and

bare hit in to her gardyne and there she pyȝte the swerde

thorow a plumtre vp to the hyltis so that hit stake faste and

hit stoode breste hyȝe and as she wolde haue renne vppon

the swerde and to haue slayne hir selff All thys aspyed

kynge Mark how she kneled a downe and seyde sweyte


f. 204v (IX.20)

 

lorde Jhu haue mercy vppon me for I may nat lyve aftir the deth

of sir Trystram de lyones for he was my firste love and shall be

the laste And with thes wordis cam kynge Marke and toke hir

in hys armys And than he toke vp the swerde and bare hit away

with hym in to a towre and there he made hir to be kepte

and wacched hir surely and aftir that she lay longe syke

nyȝe at the poynte of dethe // So thys meane whyle ran sir

Trystramys naked in the foreyste with the swerde in hys honde

and so he cam to an Ermytayge and there he layde hym

downe and slepte And in the meane whyle the Ermyte

stale away the swerde and layde mete downe by hym Thus

was he kepte there a x dayes / and at the laste he departed

and com to the herde men a yen And there was a gyaunte

in that contrey that hyȝt Tauleas and for feare of sir Trystram

more than vii yere he durste neuer muche go at large but for

the moste party he kepte hym in a sure castell of hys owne And

so thys Tauleas harde telle that sir Trystramys was dede by the

noyse of the courte of kynge Marke Than thys gyaunt Tau//

leas rode dayly at hys large And so he happyd vppon a day

he cam to the herde men wandiynge and langeryng and Þer

he sette hym downe to rest a monge them And in the meane

whyle there cam a knyght of Cornwayle that led a lady with hym

and hys name was sir Dynaunte And whan the gyaunte

saw hym he wente frome the herde men and hydde hym vnder

a tre and so the knyght cam to the well and there he a lyȝt

to repose hym and as sone as he was frome hys horse

This gyaunte Tauleas com be twyxte thys knyght and hys

horse and leped vppon hym and so forth with he rode vnto

Sir Dynaunte and toke hym by the coler and pulled hym

a fore hym vppon hys horse and wolde haue stryken of his

 

 

 

                                                      hede


f. 205 (IX.20-1)

 

hede Than the herde men seyde vnto sir Trystram helpe yondir knyȝt

helpe ye hym seyde sir Trystram we dare nat seyde the herde men//

Than sir Trystram was ware of the swerde of the knyght Þer as

hit lay and so thydir he ran and toke vp the swerde and smote

to sir Tauleas and so strake of hys hede and so he yode hys way     

to the herde men Than sir Dynaunte toke vp the gyauntes hede    

and bare hit with hym vnto kynge Marke and tolde hym                 

what adventure be tydde hym in the foreyste and how a naked

man rescowed hym frome the grymly gyaunte sir Tauleas

where had ye thys aventure seyde kynge Marke For sothe

seyde sir Dynaunte at the fayre fountayne in the foreyst where

many aduentures knyght mete and there ys the madde man

Well seyde kynge Marke I woll se that wood man So with In

a day or too kynge Marke commaunded hys knyghtes and his

hunters to be redy and seyde that he wolde hunte on the morn

And so vppon the morne he wente in to that foreyste And

whan the kynge cam to that welle he founde there lyyng

A fayre naked man and a swerde by hym Than kynge

Marke blew and straked and there with hys knyght cam to

hym and than he commaunded hys knyghtes to take Þe naked

man with fayrenes and brynge hym to my castell And so

they ded samely and fayre and keste mantels vppon Sir

Trystramys and so lad hym vnto Tyntagyll and there they

bathed hym and wayshed hym and gaff hym hote suppyn//

gis tylle they had brought hym well to hys remembraunce

But all thys whyle there was no creature that knew

Sir Trystramys nothir what maner man he was So hyt

be felle vppon a day that the quene labeall Isode hard of

such a man that ran naked in the foreyste and how Þe

kynge had brought hym home to the courte Than la beall


f. 205v (IX.21)

 

Isode called vnto her dame Brangwayne and seyde com on with me

for we well go se thys man that my lorde brouȝt frome the fo//

reste the laste day So they passed forth and spirred where was

the syke man And than a squyer tolde the quene that he was in

the gardyne takyng hys reste to repose hym a yenste the sunne

So whan the quene loked vppon sir Trystramys she was nat

remembird of hym But euer she seyde nto dame Brangwane

me semys I shulde haue sene thys man here be fore in many

placis But as sone as sir Trystramys sye he her he knew her

well I nowe And than he turned a way hys vysage and wepte

Than the quene had all wayes a lytyll brachett that sir Trys//

tramys gaff hir the first tyme that euer she cam Into Cornwayle

and neuer wold that brachet departe frome her But yf sir Trystram        

were nyȝe there as was la beall Isode and thys brachet was           

firste sente frome the kynges douȝter of fraunce vnto sir Trystrams             

for grete love and anone thys lityll brachet felte a savoure               

of sir Trystram he lepte vppon hym and lycked hys learys and

hys earys And than he whyned and quested and she smelled

at hys feete and at hys hondis and on all the partyes of hys body

that she myght com to // A my lady seyde dame Brangwayne

seyde Alas I se hit ys myne owne lorde sir Trystramys And Þer

vppon la beall Isode felle downe in a sowne and so lay a grete

whyle And whan she myght speke she seyde A my lorde Sir

Trystram blyssed be god ye haue youre lyff and now I am sure

ye shall be discouerde by thys lityll brachet for she woll neuer

leve you And also I am sure as sone as my lorde kynge

Marke do know you he woll banysh you oute of the contrey

of Cornwayle othir ellis he woll destroy you And Þer fore

for goddys sake myne owne lorde graunte kynge Marke

hys wyll And than draw you vnto the courte off kynge

Artur for there ar ye be loved and euer whan I may I shall


f. 206 (IX. 21-2)

 

sende vnto you And whan ye lyste ye may com vnto me and at

all tymys early and late I woll be at youre commaundement

to lyve as poore a lyff as euer ded quyene or lady // A madame

seyde sir Trystramys go frome me for much· angur and daunger

haue I ascaped for youre love Than the quene departed but Þe

quene brachet wolde nat frome hym And there with all cam

kynge Marke and the brachet sate vppon hym and bayed

at them all And there with all sir Andred spake and sayde sir

thys ys th Sir Trystramys I se well by that brachet // Nay

seyde the kynge I can nat suppose that Than the kyng asked

hym vppon hys faythe what he was and what was hys

name // So god me helpe seyde he my name ys sir Trystramys

de lyones now do by me what ye lyst A sayde kynge Marke

me repentis of youre recouerynge And so he lete calle hys ba//

rownes to give Jugemente vnto sir Trystramys to the dethe //

Than many of hys barownes wolde nat assente Þer to And in//

especiall sir Dynas the senesciall and sir Fergus And so by the

avyse of them all sir Trystramys was banysshed oute of Þe

contrey for x yere and there vppon he toke hys othe vppon a

booke be fore the kynge and hys barownys And so he was

made to the departe oute of the contrey of Cornwayle and Þer       

were many barownes brought hym vnto hys shyp Þat som               

were of hys frendis and som were of hy fooys And in the          

meane whyle there cam a knyght of kynge Arthurs and

hys name was sir Dynadan and hys commyng was for to seke

aftir sir Trystram Than they shewed hym where he was

armed at all poyntis goyng to the shyp // Now fayre knyght

seyde sir Dynadan or ye passe thys courte that ye woll Juste

with me // with a good wyll seyde sir Trystramys and these lordes

woll gyffe me leve Than the barownes graunted Þer to And so                   


f. 206v (IX.22)

 

they ranne to gydir And there sir Trystramys gaff sir Dynadan

a falle and than he prayde sir Trystram of hys Jantylnes to gyff

hym leve to go in hys felyshyp // ye shall be ryght well com seyd

he And than sir Trystramys and sir Dynadan toke Þer horsys &

rode to Þer shyppys to gydir And whan sir Trystrayms was in the

se he seyde grete well kynge Marke and all myne enemyes and

sey to hem I woll com a gayne whan I may And sey hym

well am I rewarded for the fyghtyng with sir Marhalt &

delyuerd all hys contrey frome servayge And well am I re//

warded for the fecchynge and costis of quene Isode oute of

Irelonde and the daunger that I was In firste and laste And

by the way commyng home what daunger I had to brynge

a gayne quene Isode frome the castell Pleure And well am

I rewarded whan I fought with sir Bleoberys for sir Seg//

warydes wyff and well am I rewarded whan I faught

with sir Blamoure de Ganys for kyng Angwysh fadir vnto

la beall Isode and well am I rewarded whan I smote down

the good knyght sir Lamerok de galis at kynge Markes reqest

And well am I rewarded whan I faught with the kynge with

the C· knyghtes and the kynge of north galys and both thes

wolde haue put hys londe in seruayge and by me they were

put to a rebuke and well am I rewarded for the sleyng

of Tauleas the myghtly gyaunte and many othir dedys

haue I done for hym and now haue I do my waryson And

telle kynge Marke that many noble knyghtes of the rounde ta//

ble haue spared the barownes of thys contrey for my sake

And also I am nat no well rewarded whan I fought with the good

knyght sir Palomydes and rescowed quene Isode frome hym

And at that tyme kynge Marke seyde a fore all hys barownes

I sholde haue bene bettir rewarded and furthe with all and

furthe with all he toke the see


 

¶ Capitulum primum

AT the Courte of kynge Arthur there cam a yonge man and bygly made / and he was rychely bysene / and he desyred to be made knyghte of the kyng but his ouer garmēt sat ouerthwartly / how be hit / hit was ryche clothe of gold /

¶ What is your name said kynge Arthur / Syre saide he / my name is Breunor le noyre / and within shorte space ye shalle knowe that I am of good kyn / It maye wel be said sir kay the Seneschal / but in mockage ye shalle be called la cote male tayle / that is as moche to saye the euyl shapen cote / Hit is a grete thynge that thou askest said the kyng / And for what cause werest thou that ryche cote / telle me / for I can wel thynke for somme cause hit is / Syre he ansuerd I had a fader a noble knyght / And as he rode on huntynge vpon a daye hit happed hym to leye hym doune slepe / And there came a knyght that had ben longe his enemy / And whan he sawe he was fast on slepe / he alle to hewe hym / And this same cote had my fader Page  339 [leaf 170r] on the same tyme / and that maketh this cote to sytte soo evyll vpon me / for the strokes ben on hit as I fond hit / and neuer shalle be amendyd for me / Thus to haue my faders dethe in remembraunce I were this cote tyl I be reuengyd / and by cause ye are callyd the moost noblest kynge of the world I come to you that ye shold make me knyght / Sir said sir Lamorak and sir Gaherys / hit were wel done to make hym knyght / for hym besemeth wel of persone / and of countenaunce / that he shall preue a good man and a good knyght / and a myghty for sire and ye be remembryd euen suche one was sire launcelot du lake / whanne he came fyrste in to this Courte / and full fewe of vs knewe from whens he came / and now is he preued the man of moost worship in the world / and all your courte and alle your Round table is by sire launcelot worshipped and amended more than by ony knyghte now lyuynge / that is trouthe saide the kynge / and to morou att your request I shalle make hym knyght

¶ So on the morou there was an herte founden / and thyder rode kynge Arthur with a company of his knyghtes to slee the herte / And this yonge man that sire kay named la cote male tayle was there lefte behynd with Quene Gueneuer / and by sodeyne aduenture ther was an horryble lyon kepte in a stronge Toure of stone and it happend that he at that tyme brake loos / and came hurlynge afore the Quene & her knyghtes

¶ And whanne the Quene sawe the lyon / she cryed and fledde / and praide her knyghtes to rescowe her / And there was none of hem alle but twelue that abode / and alle the other fledde /

¶ Thenne saide La cote male tayle Now I see wel that alle coward knyghtes ben not dede / and there with alle he drewe his swerd / and dressid hym afore the lyon / and that lyon gaped wyde and came vpon hym raumppynge to haue slayne hym / And he thenne smote hym in the mydde of the hede suche a myghty stroke / that it clafe his hede in sonder / and dasshed to the erthe /

¶ Thenne was hit tolde the Quene how the yonge man that sire kay named by scorne La cote male tayle hadde slayne the lyon / With that the kyng came home /

¶ And whanne the Quene tolde hym of that aduenture / he was wel pleased / and said / vpon payne of myn hede he shalle preue a noble man and a feythful Knyghte Page  340 [leaf 170v] and true of his promyse / thenne the kynge forth with al made hym knyght / Now sire said this yonge knyght I requyre you and alle the knyghtes of youre courte / that ye calle me by none other name but la cote male tayle / in soo moche that syr kay hath soo named me / soo wille I be called / I assente me wel therto said the kynge

¶ Capitulum secundum

THenne that same daye there came a damoysel in to the courte / and she brought with her a grete black shelde / with a whyte hand in the myddes holdynge a swerd Other pyctour was there none in that shelde / whan kyng Arthur sawe her / he asked her from whens she came / and what she wold / Syr she said I haue ryden longe and many a day with this sheld many wayes / and for this cause I am come to your courte / There was a good knyght that ought this sheld / & this knyght had vndertake a grete dede of armes to enchieue hit / and soo it mysfortuned hym / another stronge knyght met with hym by sodeyne aduenture / and there they fought longe / & eyther wounded other passynge sore / and they were soo wery / that they lefte that bataille euen hand / Soo this knyghte that ought this shelde sawe none other way but he must dye / & thēne he commaunded me to bere this shelde to the Courte of kynge Arthur / he requyrynge and prayenge somme good knyȝt to take this shelde / and that he wold fulfylle the quest that he was in / Now what saye ye to this quest said kynge Arthur / Is there ony of you here that wille take vpon hym to welde this shelde /

¶ Thenne was there not one that wold speke one word / thenne sir kay took the shelde in his handes / Sire knyȝt said the damoysel what is your name / Wete ye wel said he my name is sir kay the seneschal that wyde where is knowen / Syre said that damoysel laye doune that shelde / for wete ye wel it falleth not for you / for he must be a better knyȝt than ye / that shalle welde this shelde / damoysel sayd syr kay wete ye wel I toke this sheld in my handes by youre leue / for to behold it Page  341 [leaf 171r] not to that entent / but goo where someuer thou wilt / for I will not go with you / Thenne the damoysel stode stylle a grete whyle / and byheld many of tho knyghtes / Thenne spak the knyght La cote male tayle / fayre damoysel I wille take the shelde and that aduenture vpon me / soo I wyst I shold knowe / wheder ward my iourney myght be / for by cause I was thys daye made knyght I wold take this aduenture vpon me / What is your name fayre yonge man said the damoysel / My name is said he la cote male tayle / wel mayst thou be called so said the damoysel / the knyȝt with the euylle shapen cote / but & thou be soo hardy to take vpon the to bere that shelde and to folowe me / wete thou wel / thy skyn shalle be as wel hewen as thy cote / As for that said la cote male tayle whan I am soo hewen I wille aske you no salue to hele me with alle / And forth with all ther came in to the Court two squyers & brouȝt hym grete horses and his armour and his speres / and anone he was armed and tooke his leue /

¶ I wold not by my will said the kynge that ye took vpon you that hard aduenture / sir said he / this aduenture is myn / and the fyrst that euer I took vpon me / and that wille I folowe what someuer come of me

¶ Thenne that damoysel departed / and la cote male tayle fast folowed after / And within a whyle he ouertook the damoysell and anone she myssaid hym in the fowlest maner

¶ Capitulum Tercium /

THenne sire kay ordeyned sir dagonet / kynge Arthurs foole to folowe after la cote male taile / and there sir kay ordeyned that sir Dagonet was horsed and armed and bad hym folowe la cote male taile / and profer hym to Iuste and soo he dyd / and whan he sawe la cote male tayle he cryed and badde hym make hym redy to Iuste / Soo sir la cote male tayle smote sir Dagonet ouer his hors croupe / Thenne the damoysel mocked la cote male tayle / and said fy for shame / now art thou shamed in Arthurs courte / whan they sende a foole to haue adoo with the / and specially at thy fyrst Iustes / thus she rode longe and chyde /

¶ And within a whyle there Page  342 [leaf 171v] came sir Bleoberys the good knyght / and there he Iusted with la cote male tayle / and there syre Bleoberys smote hym so sore that hors and alle felle to the erth / Thenne la cote male tayle arose vp lyghtely and dressid his sheld / and drewe his suerd and wold haue done bataill to the vtteraūce / for he was wode wrothe / Not soo said Bleoberys de ganys / as at this tyme I wille not fyghte vpon foote / Thenne the damoysel Maledysaūt rebuked hym in the foulest maner / and badde hym torne ayene coward / A damoysel he said I pray you of mercy to myssay me no more / my gryef is ynough though ye gyue me no more / I calle my self neuer the wers knyght / whan a marys sone fayleth me / and also I compte me neuer the wers knyght for a falle of sir Bleoberys / Soo thus he rode with her two dayes / and by fortune there came sir Palomydes and encountred with hym / and he in the same wyse serued hym as dyd Bleoberys to fore hand /

¶ What dost thou here in my felauship saide the damoysel maledysaunt / thou canst not sytte no knyghte / nor withstande hym one buffet / but yf hit were sir dagonet / A fair damoysel I am not the wers to take a falle of sire Palamydes / and yet grete disworship haue I none / for neyder Bleoberys nor yet palamydes wold not fyghte with me on foote / As for that said the damoysel wete thou wel they haue desdayne and scorne to lyghte of their horses to fyghte with suche a lewde knyght as thou arte / Soo in the meane whyle ther cam sir Mordred / sir Gawayns broder / and soo he felle in the felauship with the damoysel maledysaunt / And thenne they came afore the castel Orgulous / and there was suche a customme that there myght no knyght come by that castel / but outher he must Iuste or be prysoner / or at the lest to lese his hors and his harneis / and there came oute two knyghtes ageynst them / and sir Mordred Iusted with the formest / and that knyght of the castel smote sire Mordred doune of his hors / and thenne la cote male tayle Iusted with that other / and eyther of hem smote other doune hors and alle to the erthe / And whanne they auoyded their horses / thenne eyther of hem took others horses /

¶ And thenne la cote male tayle rode vnto that knyght that smote doune sire Mordred and Iusted with hym / And there syre La cote male tayle hurte & wounded hym passynge sore Page  343 [leaf 172r] and putte hym from his hors as he had ben dede / So he torned vnto hym that mette hym afore / and he took the flyght toward the castel / and sire la cote male tayle rode after hym in to the Castel Orgulous / and there la cote male tayle slewe hym

¶ Capitulum iiij

ANd anone there came an honderd knyȝtes about hym and assaylled hym / and whan he sawe his hors shold be slayne / he alyghte and voyded his hors / & putte the brydel vnder his feete / and so put hym out of the gate / And whan he had soo done / he hurled in amonge hem / and dressid his bak vnto a ladyes chamber walle / thynkynge hym self that he had leuer dye there with worship / than to abyde the rebukes of the damoisel Maledysaunt / And in the meane tyme as he stood & fouȝt that lady whos was the chamber wente out slyly at her posterne / and without the gates she fond la cote male tayles hors and lyghtly she gate hym by the brydel / and teyed hym to the posterne / And thenne she wente vnto her chambre slyly ageyn for to behold hou that one knyght fought ageynst an honderd knyghtes / And whan she had behold hym longe / she wente to a wyndowe behynde his bak / and said thou knyght thou fyghtest wonderly wel / but for alle that at the last thou must nedes dye / But and thou canst thorou thy myȝty prowesse wynne vnto yonder posterne / for there I haue fastned thy hors to abyde the / but wete thou wel thou must thynke on thy worship / & thynke not to dye / for thou maiste not wynne vnto that posterne without thou doo nobly and myghtly / Whan la cote male tayle herd her saye so / he gryped his swerd in his handes and put his sheld fayre afore hym / & thorou the thyckest prees he thrulled thorou them / And whan he came to the posterne he fond there redy four knyghtes / and at two the fyrst strokes he slewe two of the knyghtes / & the other fledde / & soo he wanne his hors and rode from them / and alle as it was it was reherced in kynge Arthurs courte / hou he slewe twelue knyghtes within the castel Orgulous / and so he rode on his waye / And in the meane whyle the damoysel said to sir Mordred I wene my foolysshe knyȝt be outher slayn or takē prysoner / thēne were they ware where he came rydyng / And whan he was come Page  344 [leaf 172v] to them / he told alle how he hadde spedde / and escaped in despyte of them alle / and somme of the best of hem wille telle no tales / Thou lyest falsly saide the damoysel / that dare I make good / but as a foole and a dastard to alle knyghthode / they haue lete the passe / that may ye preue said La cote male tayle / With that she sente a currour of hers that rode alweye with her for to knowe the trouthe of this dede / and soo he rode thydder lyghtly / and asked how and in what maner that la cote male tayle was escaped oute of the castel /

¶ Thenne alle the knyghtes cursyd hym and said that he was a fende and noo man / For he hath slayne here twelue of oure best knyghtes / & we wende vnto this daye that hit ben to moche for sir laūcelot du lake or for sire Tristram de lyones / And in despyte of vs alle he is departed from vs and maulgre oure hedes /

¶ With this ansuer the currour departed and came to Maledysaunt his lady / and told her alle how syr la cote male tayle had spedde at the castel Orgulous / Thenne she smote doun her heed / and sayd lytel / By my hede said sir Mordred to the damoysel ye are gretely to blame so to rebuke hym / for I warne you playnly he is a good knyghte / and I doubte not / but he shalle preue a noble knyghte / but as yet he may not yet sytt sure on horsbak / for he that shalle be a good horsman / hit must come of vsage and excercyse / But whan he cometh to the strokes of his swerd / he is thenne noble and myghty / and that sawe sire Bleoberys and sir Palamydes / for wete ye wel they are wyly men of armes / and anon they knowe when they see a yonge knyghte by his rydyng / how they ar sure to yeue hym a falle from his hors or a grete buffet / But for the moost party they wille not lyghte on foote with yonge knyghtes / For they are wyght and strongly armed / For in lyke wyse sir launcelot du lake whan he was fyrste made knyghte / he was often putte to the werse vpon horsbak / but euer vpon foote he recouerd his renomme / and slewe and defoyled many knyghtes of the round table / And therfor the rebukes that sir Launcelot dyd vnto many knyghtes causeth them that be men of prowesse to beware / for often I haue sene the old preued knyghtes rebuked and slayne by them that were but yonge begynners / Thus they rode sure talkynge by the way to gyders /Page  345 [leaf 173r]

¶ here leue we of a whyle of this tale and speke we of sire Launcelot du lake /

¶ Capitulum Quintum

THat whan he was come to the courte of kynge Arthur thenne herd he telle of the yonge knyghte la cote male tayle how he slewe the lyon / & how he tooke vpon hym the aduenture of the black shelde / the whiche was named atte that tyme the hardyest aduenture of the world / Soo god me saue said sir Laūcelot vnto many of his felawes / it was shame to alle the noble knyghtes to suffre suche a yonge knyghte to take suche aduenture vpon hym for his destructyon / for I wille that ye wete said sire launcelot / that that damoysel maledysaunt hath born that shelde many a day for to seche the most proued knyghtes / and that was she that Breunys saunce pyte took that sheld from her / and after Tristram de lyones rescowed that shelde from hym / and gaf it to the damoysell ageyne A lytil afore that tyme that sir Tristram fought with my neuewe sire Blamore de Ganys for a quarel that was betwixe the kynge of Irland and hym / Thenne many knyghtes were sory that sir La cote male tayle was gone forth to that aduenture / Truly said sir launcelot I cast me to ryde after hym / and within seuen dayes sir launcelot ouertook la cote male tayle / And thenne he salewed hym / and the damoysel maledysaunt / And whan sir Mordred sawe sir laūcelot / thenne he lefte their felauship / and soo sir launcelot rode with hem al a day / and euer that damoysel rebuked la cote male taile / and thenne sire launcelot ansuerd for hym / thenne she lefte of / and rebuked sir launcelot / Soo this meane tyme syre Tristram sente by a damoysel a letter vnto sire launcelot excusynge hym of the weddynge of Isoud le blaunche maynys / and said in the letter as he was a true knyȝt / he hadde neuer adoo flesshly with Isoud la blaunche maynys / and passynge curtoisly & gentyly sir tristram wrote vnto sire launcelot / euer bysechyng hym to be his good frende / & vnto la beale Isoud of Cornewaile / and that sire Page  346 [leaf 173v] Launcelot wold excuse hym yf that euer he sawe her /

¶ And within shorte tyme by the grace of god said sir Tristram that he wold speke with la Beale Isoud and with hym ryghte hastely / Thenne sire Launcelot departed from the damoysel / & from syr la cote male taile for to ouersee that letter / and to wryte another letter vnto syre Tristram de lyones / and in the meane whyle la cote male tayle roode with the damoysel vntyl they came to a castel that hyght Pendragon / and there were syxe knyghtes stode afore hym / and one of hem profered to Iuste with la cote male tayle / And there la cote male tayle smote hym ouer his hors croupe /

¶ And thenne the fyue knyghtes sette vpon hym all at ones with their speres / & there they smote la cote male tayle doune hors and man / And thenne they alyght sodenly / and sette their handes vpon hym all attones / and toke hym prysoner / and soo ledde hym vnto the castel / & kepte hym as prysoner / And on the morne sir Launcelot arose and delyuerd the damoysel with letters vnto sir Tristram / & thenne he took his way after la cote male tayle / & by the waye vpon a brydge there was a knyghte profered sire Launcelot to Iuste / and sire Launcelot smote hym doune / and thenne they foughte vpon foote a noble batail to gyders and a myghty / & at the laste sire Launcelot smote hym doune grouelynge vpon his handes and his knees / And thenne that knyghte yelded hym / and sire launcelot receyued hym fayre / Syr said the knyght I requyre the telle me your name / for moche my herte yeueth vnto you / Nay said sire Launcelot as at this tyme I wil not telle you my name / onles thenne that ye telle me your name / Certaynly said the knyght my name is sir Nerouens that was made knyght of my lord sir Launcelot du lake / A Nerouens de lyle said sire Launcelot I am ryght gladde that ye ar proued a good knyghte / for now wete ye wel my name is sir Launcelot du lake / Allas said sire Nerouens de lyle what haue I done / and there with al flatlyng he selle to his feet / and would haue kyst them / but sir Launcelot wold not lete hym / & thenne eyther made grete ioye of other / And thenne sire Nerouens told sir Launcelot that he shold not goo by the castel of Pendragon / for there is a lord a myghty knyght / and many knyghtes with hym / and this nyght I herd say that they toke Page  347 [leaf 174r] a knyght prysoner yesterday that rode with a damoysel / & they saye he is a knyghte of the round table

¶ Capitulum vj

A Said sir Launcelot that knyght is my felawe / & hym shalle I rescowe or els I shalle lese my lyf therfore And there with alle he rode fast tyl he came before the Castel of Pendragon / and anone there with alle there cam vj knyghtes / and alle made hem redy to sette vpon sire Launcelot at ones / thenne sire Laūcelot feutryd his spere / and smote the formest that he brake his bak in fonder / and thre of them hytte and thre fayled / And thenne sire launcelot past thorou them / and lyghtly he torned in ageyne / and smote another knyghte / thorugh the brest and thorou oute the bak more than an ell / & ther with alle his spere brak / Soo thenne alle the remenaunt of the four knyghtes drewe their swerdes and lasshed at syre Launcelot / And at euery stroke sire launcelot bestowed so his strokes that at four strokes sondry they auoyded theyr sadels passynge sore wounded / and forthe with alle rode hurlynge in to that castel / And anon the lord of the castel that was that tyme cleped sir Bryan de les yles the which was a noble mā and grete enemy vnto kyng arthur / within a whyle he was armed and vpon horsbak / And thenne they feutryd their speres and hurled to gyders soo strongly that bothe theire horses rasshed to the erthe / And thenne they auoyded their sadels / & dressid their sheldes and drewe theire swerdes and flange to gyders as wood men / and there were many strokes yeuen in a whyle / at the last sir launcelot gaf to sir Bryan suche a buffet that he kneled vpon his knees / and thenne sir launcelot rasshed vpon hym / and with grete force he pulled of his helme / and whanne sire Bryan sawe that he shold be slayne he yelded hym and put hym in his mercy and in his grace / Thenne sire launcelot made hym to delyuer alle his prysoners that he had within his castel / and therin sir laūcelot fonde of arthurs knyghtes thyrtty / and / xl / ladyes / and soo he delyuerd hem / and thenne he rode his waye / and anon as la cote male tayle was delyuerd he gat his hors and his harneis / and his damoysel Page  348 [leaf 174v] Maledysaunt / the meane whyle syre Neroueus that sir Launcelot had foughten with alle afore at the brydge / he sente a damoysel after sir Launcelot to wete hou he spedde at the Castell of Pendragon / And thenne they within the castel merueylled what knyght he was whan sir Bryan and his knyghtes delyuerd alle tho prysoners / haue ye no merueille said the damoysel / for the best knyghte in this world was here / and dyd this iourney / and wete ye wel she said it was sire launcelott Thenne was sir Bryan ful gladde and soo was his lady / & alle his knyghtes / that suche a man shold wynne them / And whan the damoysel and la cote male tayle vnderstood that it was syr Launcelot du lake that had ryden with them in felauship /

¶ And that she remembryd her hou she had rebuked hym and callyd hym coward / thenne was she passynge heuy

¶ Capitulum septimum

SOo thenne they took their horses and rode forth a pas aster sire Launcelot / And within two myle they ouertook hym / and salewed hym / and thanked hym / and the damoysel cryed sir Launcelot mercy of her euyll dede / and sayenge / for now I knowe the floure of alle knyghthode is departed euen bitwene sire Tristram and you / For god knoweth said the damoysel that I haue soughte you my lord sir Launcelot and sir Tristram longe / and now I thanke god I haue mette with you / and ones at Camelot I mette with sir Tristram / and there he rescowed this blak shelde with the whyte hand holdynge a naked swerd / that sir Bruyns saunce pyte had taken from me / Now fayre damoysel said sir Launcelot who told you my name / Syre said she / there came a damoysell from a knyghte that ye fought with all at the brydge / and she told me your name was sir Launcelot du lake / blame haue she thenne said sire Launcelot / but her lord sire Neroueus hath told her / But damoysel said sire Launcelot vpon this couenaunt I wille ryde with you / so that ye wille not rebuke this knyght sir La cote male tayle nomore / for he is a good knyght and I doubte not he shalle preue a noble knyght / and for his Page  349 [leav 175r] sake and pyte that he sholde not be destroyed / I folowed hym to socoure hym in this grete nede / A / Ihesu thanke you said the damoysel / for now I wil say vnto you and to hym both / I rebuked hym neuer for no hate that I hated hym / but for grete loue that I had to hym / For euer I supoosed that he had ben to yonge and to tendyr to take vpon hym these aduentures / And therfore by my wille I wold haue dryuen hym aweye for Ialousy that I had of his lyf / for it maye be no yong knyghtes dede that shal enchyeue this aduenture to the ende / Perdieu said sire Launucelot his is wel said / and where ye are called the damoysel Maledysaunt I wille calle you the damoysel Bien pensaunt / and soo they rode forthe a grete whyle vnto they came to the Bordoure of the countrey of Surluse / and there they fond a fayr vyllage with a stronge brydge lyke a fortresse / And whanne sir launcelot and they were at the bridge / there starte forth afore them of gentilmen and yomen many that saide / Faire lordes ye maye not passe this brydge and this fortresse by cause of that black shelde that I see one of you bere / And therfore there shalle not passe but one of you at ones / therfore chese you whiche of you shalle entre withynne this brydge fyrste / Thenne sir Launcelot profered hym self fyrst to entre within this brydge / Syr said La cote male tayle I biseche you lete me entre within this fortresse / and yf I may spede wel / I wille sende for you / and yf it happend that I be slayn there it goth / And yf soo be that I am a prysoner taken / thenne maye ye rescowe me / I am lothe said sir launcelot to lete you passe this passage / Syre said la cote male tayle I praye you lete me putte my body in this aduenture / Now goo youre waye said sire Laūcelot / and Ihesu be your spede / So he entrid and anone there mette with hym two bretheren / the one hyȝte syr Playne de force and the other hyght sir Playne he amours And anone they mette with sir la cote male tayle / and fyrste la cote male tayle smote doune Playne de force / and after he smote doune playne de amours / and thenne they dressid them to their sheldes and swerdes / and badde la cote male tayle alyghte / and soo he dyd / and there was dasshyng and foynyng with swerdes / and soo they began to assaile ful hard la cote male tayle / and many grete woundes they gaf hym vpon his Page  350 [leaf 175v] heed and vpon his brest and vpon his sholders / And as he myght euer amonge he gaf sadde strokes ageyne / And thenne the two bretheren traced and trauercyd for to be of bothe handes of sire la cote male tayle / but he by fyne force & knyghtly prowesse gate hem afore hym / And thenne whan he felte hym self soo wounded / thenne he doubled his strokes / & gaf them soo many woundes that he feld them to the erthe / & wold haue slayne them had they not yelded them / And ryȝt soo sire la cote male tayle tooke the best hors that there was of them thre / and soo rode forth his waye to the other fortresse & brydge and there he mette with the thyrd broder whoos name was sire Plenorius / a ful noble knyghte / and there they Iusted to gyder / and eyther smote other doune hors and man to the erthe / And thenne they auoyded their horses / and dressid their sheldes / and drewe their swerdes / and gaf many sad strokes / and one whyle the one knyght was afore on the brydge / and an other whyle the other / And thus they foughte two houres and more / and neuer rested / And euer sire Launcelot and the damoysel beheld them /

¶ Allas said the damoysel my knyghte fyghteth passynge sore and ouer longe /

¶ Now may ye see said sir Launcelot that he is a noble knyghte for to consydre his fyrste bataile / and his greuous woundes / And euen forth with all so wounded as he is / it is merueile that he may endure this longe batail with that good knyghte /

¶ Capitulum Octauum

THis meane whyle syre la cote male tayle sanke ryghte doun vpon the erthe / what forwounded and what forbled he myghte not stande / Thenne the other knyghte hadde pyte of hym / and sayd fayr yonge knyghte desmaye you not / for had ye ben fresshe whan ye mette with me / as I was / I wote wel that I shold not haue endured so longe as ye haue done / and therfore / for youre noble dedes of armes / I shall shewe to you kyndenes and gentylnesse in alle that I maye / And forth with al this noble knyght sir Plenorius took hym vp in his armes / and ledde hym in to his toure / And thenne Page  351 [leaf 176r] he commaunded hym the wyn / and made to sarche hym and to stoppe his bledynge woundes /

¶ Syre said la cote male tayle withdrawe you from me / and hyhe you to yonder brydge ageyne / for there wille mete with you another maner knyght than euer was I / why said Plenorius / is there another maner knyght behynde of your felauship / ye said la cote male tayle / ther is a moche better knyght than I am / what is his name sayd Plenorius / ye shalle not knowe for me / said la cote male tayle Wel said the knyght / he shalle be encountred with alle / what someuer he be / Thenne sir Plenorius herd a knyght calle / that sayd syr Plenorius where art thou / outher thou must delyuer me the prysoner that thou hast led vnto thy toure / or els come and doo bataile with me / Thenne Plenorius gat his hors / and came with a spere in his hand walloppynge toward syr launcelot / and thenne they beganne to feutre their speres / and came to gyders as thonder / and smote eyther other so myghtely that their horses felle doune vnder them / And thenne they auoyded their horses / and pulled out their swerdes / & lyke two bulles they lasshed to gyders with grete strokes and foynes / but euer syr launcelot recouerd ground vpon hym / and sire Plenorius traced to haue gone aboute hym / But sire launcelot wold not suffer that / but bare hym backer and backer / tyll he came nyyhe his toure gate / And thenne said sire launcelot I knowe the wel for a good knyght / but wete thou wel / thy lyf and dethe is in my hand / and therfore yelde the to me / and thy prysoner The other ansuerd no word / but strake myȝtely vpon sir laūcelots helme that the fyre sprange out of his eyen / thenne syre Launcelot doubled his strokes soo thyck / and smote at hym so myghtely that he made hym knele vpon his knees / And there with sir launcelot lepte vpon hym / and pulled hym grouelyng doune / Thenne sir Plenorius yelded hym / and his toure / and alle his prysoners at his wille / thenne sir launcelot receyued hym and took his trouthe / and thēne he rode to the other brydge / and there sir launcelot Iusted with other thre of his bretheren / the one hyght Pillounes / and the other hyght Pellogris and the thyrdde sir Pellandris / and fyrst vpon horsbak sir launcelot smote hem doune / and afterward he bete them on foote / and made them to yelde them vnto hym / and thenne he retorned Page  352 [leaf 176v] vnto sir Plenorius / and there he fond in his pryson kyng Carados of scotland and many other knyghtes / and alle they were delyuerd / And thenne sire la cote male tayle came to sire launcelot / and thenne sir launcelot wold haue yeuen hym alle these fortresses and these brydges / Nay said la cote male tayle I wille not haue sire Plenorius lyuelode / with that he wylle graunte you my lord sire launcelot to come vnto kynge Arthurs courte and to be his knyght and alle his bretheren I will pray you my lord to lete hym haue his lyuelode / I wille wel said sire launcelot / with this that he wille come to the Courte of kynge Arthur and bicome his man / and his bretheren fyue / And as for you sir Plenorius I wille vndertake said sir Launcelot at the next feest soo there be a place voyded that ye shalle be knyght of the round table / Syr said Plenorius atte next feest of Pentecost I wille be at Arthurs courte / and at that tyme I wille be guyded and ruled as kynge Arthur & ye wille haue me / Thenne sir Launcelot and sire la cote male tayle reposed hem there vnto the tyme sire la cote male tayle was hole of his woundes / and there they hadde mery chere and good rest and many good gamys / and there were many fayre ladyes /

¶ Capitulum Nonum /

ANd in the meane whyle came sir kay the seneschal and sire Brandyles / and anone they felaushypped wyth them / And thenne within ten dayes thēne departed tho knyghtes of Arthurs Courte from these fortresses / And as sir laūcelot came by the castel of Pendragon / there he putte sir Bryan de les yles from his landes / for cause he wold neuer be withhold with kynge Arthur / and alle that castel of Pendragon / and alle the landes therof he gaf to sire la cote male tayle / & thēne sir launcelot sente for Neroueus that he made ones knyghte / and he made hym to haue alle the rule of that castel / & of that countrey vnder la cote mayle tayle / and soo they rode to Arthurs courte al holy to gyders / And at Pentecost next folowynge there was sire Plenorius and sir la cote male tayle called otherwyse by ryght syr Breunes le noyre bothe maade Page  353 [leaf 177r] knyghtes of the table round / and grete londes kynge Arthur gaf them / and there Breune le noyre wedded that damoysell Maledysaunt / And after she was called Beau viuante / but euer after for the more party he was called la cote male tayle and he preued a passynge noble knyghte and myghty / & many worshipful dedes he dyd after in his lyf / and sire Plenorius proued a noble knyght and ful of prowesse / and alle the dayes of their lyf for the moost party they awayted vpon sir laūcelot / and sire Plenorius bretheren were euer knyghtes of kynge Arthur / and also as the frensshe book maketh mencyon / syr la cote male tayle auengyd his faders dethe /

¶ Capitulum x

NOw leue we here sire la cote male tayle / and torne we vnto sir Tristram de lyones that was in Bretayne / whanne la beale Isoud vnderstode that he was wedded / she sent to hym by her mayden Bragwayne as pyteous letters as coude be thoughte and made / and her conclusion was / that / and hit pleasyd syr Tristram / that he wold come to her courte / and brynge with hym Isoud la blaunche maynys / and they shold be kepte as wel as she her self / Thenne sir Tristram called vnto hym sir kehydius / and asked hym whether he wold go with hym in to Cornewaile secretely / He ansuerd hym that he was redy at al tymes / And thenne he lete ordeyne pryuely / a lytel vessel / and therin they wente syr Tristram / kehydius / Dame Bragwayne and Gouernaile sir Tristrams squyer / So when they were in the see / a contraryous wynde blewe hem on the costes of Northwalys nygh the castel peryllous / Thenne sayd sir Tristram here shalle ye abyde me these ten dayes / and Gouernaile my squyer with you / And yf so be I come not ageyne / by that daye / take the next way in to Cornewaile / for in thys forest are many straunge aduentures / as I haue herd saye / & somme of hem I caste me to preue or I departe / And whanne I maye / I shalle hyhe me after you / Thenne sir Tristram and kehydius took their horses and departed from their felauship / And soo they rode within that forest a myle and more / And Page  354 [leaf 177v] at the last sir Tristram sawe afore hym a lykely knyȝt armed syttynge by a welle / and a stronge myghty hors passyng nyghe hym teyed to an Oke and a man houynge and rydynge by hym ledynge an hors lade with speres / And this knyghte that satte atte welle / semed by his countenaunce to be passyng heuy / Thenne sire Tristram rode nere hym / and said fayr knyȝt why sytte ye soo droupyng / ye seme to be a knyght erraunt by your armes and harneis / and therfor dresse you to Iuste with one of vs or with bothe / There with all that knyght made noo wordes / but took his shelde and bokeled hit aboute his neck / and lyghtely he took his hors and lepte vpon hym / And thēne he took a grete spere of his squyer / and departed his waye a furlonge / Sire kehydius asked leue of sir Tristram to Iuste fyrst / doo your best said sire Tristram / soo they mette to gyders and there sir kehydius had a falle / and was sore wounded / on hyghe aboue the pappys /

¶ Thenne sir Tristram said / knyȝt that is wel Iusted / Now make you redy vnto me / I am redy said the knyght / And thenne that knyght took a gretter spere in his hand / and encountred with sir Tristram / and there by grete force that knyght smote doune sir Tristram from his hors and had a grete falle / Thenne sir Tristram was sore ashamed / and lyghtly he auoyded his hors / and put his sheld afore his sholder and drewe his swerd / And thenne sire Trystram requyred that knyghte of his knyghthode to alyghte vpon foote and fyghte with hym / I wille wel said the knyght and soo he alyghte vpon foote / and auoyded his hors / and cast his shelde vpon his sholder / and drewe his swerd / and there they fought a longe bataile to gyder ful nyghe two houres /

¶ Thenne sir Tristram said fayr knyght hold thyn hand / & telle me of whens thou arte / and what is thy name /

¶ As for that said the knyght / I wille be auysed / but and thou wolt telle me thy name / peraduenture I wille telle the myn /

¶ Capitulum xj

NOw fayr knyght he said / my name is sire Tristram de lyones / Syre saide the other knyght / and my name is sir lamorak de galys / A sir lamorak said sir Tristram / well Page  355 [leaf 178r] be we mette / and bethynke the now of the despyte thou dydest me of the sendyng of the horne vnto kynge Markes courte to the entente to haue slayne or dishonoured my lady the Quene la Beale Isoud / and therfore wete thou wel said sir Tristram the one of vs shalle dye or we departe / Sire said sir Lamorak remembre that we were to gyders in the yle of seruage / and at that tyme ye promysed me grete frendship / thenne sire Tristram wold make no lenger delayes but lasshed at sir Lamorak / & thus they foughte longe / tyl eyder were wery of other / Thenne sir Tristram seid to sir Lamorak in alle my lyf mette I neuer with suche a knyght that was soo bygge and well brethed as ye be / therfore said syre Tristram hit were pyte / that ony of vs both shold here be meschyeued Syr said sire Lamorak for youre renomme and name I wille that ye haue the worship of this bataille / and therfor I will yelde me vnto you / And ther with he took the poynte of his swerd to yelde hym / Nay said sir tristram ye shalle not doo soo / for wel I knowe your profers and more of your gentylnesse than for my fere or drede ye haue of me / And there with alle sir Tristram profered hym his swerde and said sire Lamorak as an ouercomen knyghte I yelde me vnto you / as to a mā of the most noble prowesse / that euer I mette with alle / Nay said sir Lamorak I wille doo you gentylnesse / I requyre yow lete vs be sworne to gyders that neuer none of vs shalle after this day haue adoo with other / and there with alle syre Tristram and sire Lamorak sware that neuer none of hem shold fyghte ageynst other nor for wele / nor for woo

¶ Capitulum xij

ANd this meane whyle there came sire Palomydes the good knyght folowynge the questynge beest that hadde in shap a hede lyke a serpentes hede / and a body lyke a lybard / buttocks lyke a lyon / and foted lyke an herte / and in his body there was suche a noyse as hit had ben the noyse of thyrtty coupel of hoūdes questyng / and suche a noyse that beest made where someuer he wente / & this beest euermore syr palomydes folowed / for hit was called his quest / & ryȝt so as he folowed this beest / it came by syr Tristram / and soone after cam Page  356 [leaf 178v] Palamydes / and to breue this matere / he smote doune sir tristram and sir Lamorak bothe with one spere / and soo he departed after the beste Glatysaunt / that was called the questynge beest / wherfore these two knyghtes were passynge wrothe / that sir Palomydes wold not fyghte on foote with hem /

¶ Here men may vnderstande / that ben of worship that he was neuer fourmed that alle tymes myght stande / but somtyme he was putte to the werse by male fortune / And at soome tyme the wers knyghte putte the better knyghte to a rebuke / Thenne sire Tristram the sire Lamorak gate sire kehydius vpon a sheld betwixe them bothe / and ledde hym to a fosters lodge / & there they gaf hym in charge to kepe hym well / and with hym they abode thre dayes / Thenne the two knyghtes toke their horses / and at the crosse they departed / And thenne said sir Tristram to fire Lamorak I requyre you yf ye happe to mete wyth sir Palamydes / say hym that he shal fynde me atte same welle there I mette hym / and there I sire Tristram shalle preue whether he be better knyght than I / and soo eyther departed from other a sondry way / and sire tristram rode nyghe there as was sire kehydius / and sire Lamorak rode vn tyl he came to a chapel / and there he putte his hors vnto pasture / and anone there came sir Melyagaunce that was kynge Bagdemagus sone / & he there putte his hors to pasture / and was not ware of sir lamorak / and thenne this knyght sire Melliagaunce maade his mone of the loue that he hadde to quene Gueneuer / and there he made a woful complaynte / All this herd sire Lamorak / and on the morne sir lamorak took his hors and rode vnto the forest / and there he mette with two knyghtes houynge vnder the wood shawe / Faire knyghtes said fire Lamorak what doo ye houynge here and watchynge / And yf ye be knyghtes arraunt that wille Iuste / loo I am redy / Nay sir knyght they said / not soo / we abyde not here for to Iuste with you / but we lye here in a wayte of a Knyghte that slewe our broder /

¶ What knyght was that said sir Lamorak that ye wold fayne mete with all / Syre they said / hit is sire launcelot that slewe oure broder / And yf euer we maye mete with hym / he shal not escape but we shalle slee hym /

¶ Ye take vpon you a Page  357 [leaf 179r] grete charge saide sir Lamorak / for sire launcelot is a noble proued knyȝt / As for that we doute not / for there nys none of vs but we are good ynough for hym I will not bileue that said sir Lamorak / For I herd neuer yet of no knyght the dayes of my lyf but sir launcelot was to bygge for hym

¶ Capitulum xiij /

RYyght soo as they stode talkynge thus / syre Lamorak was ware hou syr launcelot came rydynge streyghte toward them / thenne sire Lamorak salewed hym / and he hym ageyne / And thenne sire lamorak asked sir launcelot / yf there were ony thynge that he myght doo for hym in these marches / Nay said sire launcelot not at this tyme / I thanke you / thenne eyther departed from other / and sir Lamorak rode ageyn ther as he lefte the two knyghtes / and thenne he fond them hydde in the leued woode / Fy on you said sir Lamorak fals cowardes / pyte and shame it is / that ony of you shold take the hyhe ordre of knyghthode / Soo sir Lamorak departed fro them / and within a whyle he mette with sire Melyagaunce / And thenne syre Lamorak asked hym / why he loued Quene Gueneuer as he dyd / for I was not fer from you whanne ye made your complaynte by the cappel / Dyd ye soo said sir Melyagaūce / thenne wille I abyde by hit / I loue quene gueneuer what wille ye with hit / I wille preue and make good / that she is the fayrest lady and moost of beaute in the world /

¶ As to that said sire Lamorak I say nay therto / for quene Morgause of Orkeney moder to sire Gawayne and his moder is the fayrest quene and lady that bereth the lyf / That is not so sayd syre Melyagaunce / and that wille I preue with my handes vpon thy body / wille ye soo said sire Lamorak / and in a better quarel kepe I not to fyghte / Thenne they departed eyther from other in grete wrathe / And thenne they came rydyng to gyder as hit had ben thonder / and eyther smote other so sore that their horses felle bakward to the erthe / And thenne they auoyded their horses and dressid their sheldes / and drewe their swerdes And thenne they hurtled to gyders as wylde bores / and thus Page  358 [leaf 179v] they fought a grete whyle / For Melyagaunce was a good man and of grete myght / but sire Lamorak was hard bygge for hym / and putte hym alweyes a bak / but eyther had wounded other sore /

¶ And as they stode thus fyghtynge / by fortune came sire Launcelot and sire Bleoberys rydynge / And thenne sire launcelot rode betwixe them / and asked them / For what cause they fought soo to gyders / and ye are bothe knyghtes of kynge Arthur /

¶ Capitulum xiiij

SYr said Melyagaunce I shalle telle you for what cause we doo this bataille / I praysed my lady Quene Gueneuer / and said she was the fayrest lady of the world / and sire Lamorak said nay therto / For he said quene Morgause of Orkeney was fayrer than she and more of beaute / A syre Lamorak why saist thou soo / hit is not thy parte to disprayse thy pryncesse that thou arte vnder theire obeyssaunce dn we alle / and there with he alyghte on foote / and sayd for this quarel make the redy / For I wille preue vpon the / that Quene Gueneuer is the fayrest lady and moost of bounte in the world

¶ Syre said sire Lamorak I am loth to haue adoo with you in this quarell / For euery man thynketh his owne lady fayrest / and though I prayse the lady / that I loue moost / ye shold not be wrothe / For though my lady quene Gueneuer be fayrest in your eye / wete ye wel Quene Morgause of Orkeney is fayrest in myn eye / and soo euery knyght thynketh his owne lady fayrest / and wete ye wel syr ye are the man in the world excepte sire Tristram / that I am moost lothest to haue adoo with alle / But and ye wille nedes fyghte with me I shal endure you as long as I may /

¶ Thenne spake sire Bleoberys / and said / my lord sire Laūcelot / I wyste you neuer soo mysauysed as ye are now / For syre Lamorak saith you but reason and knyghtely /

¶ For I warne you I haue a lady / and me thynketh that she is the fayrest lady of the world / were this a grete reason that ye shold be wrothe with me for suche langage / And wel ye wote / that syr Lamorak is as noble a knyght as I knowe / and he Page  359 [leaf 180r] hath oughte you and vs euer good wille / and therfore I praye you be good frendes /

¶ Thenne sire Launcelot sayd vnto sir lamerak / I pray you foryeue me myn euylle wylle / And yf I was mysauysed I wille amende hit / Syre sayde sir Lamorak the amendys is soone made betwixe you and me And soo sir Launcelot and sire Bleoberys departed / and syr Melyagaunce and sir Lamorak took their horses / and eyther departed from other / And within a whyle came kynge Arthur and mette with sir Lamorak and Iusted with hym / and there he smote doune sire Lamorack / and wounded hym sore with a spere / and soo he rode from hym / wherfore sir Lamorak was wrothe that he wold not fyghte with hym on foote / hou be it that sire Lamorak knewe not kynge Arthur

¶ Capitulum xv

NOw leue we of this tale / and speke we of sire Tristram / that as he rode he mette with sir kay the seneschal and there sire kay asked sir Tristram of what coūtrey he was / he ansuerd that he was of the countrey of Cornewail Hit maye wel be said sir kay / for yet herd I neuer that euer good knyghte came oute of Cornewaile / that is euyl spoken said sir Tristram / but and it please you to telle me your name I requyre you / Syre wete ye wel said sire kay that my name is sire kay the seneschal / Is that your name said sir Tristram / now wete ye well that ye are named the shamefullest knyghte of youre tonge that now is lyuynge / how be it ye are called a good knyght / but ye are called vnfortunate / and passyng ouerthwarte of your tonge / And thus they rode to gyders tyl they came to a brydge / And there was a knyghte wold not lete hem passe / tyl one of hem Iusted with hym / and so that knyȝt Iusted with sir kay / and there that knyght gaf sir kay a falle / his name was sire Tor syre Lamoraks half broder / and thenne they two rode to theyre lodgynge / And there they fonde sire Brandyles / and sir Tor came thyder anone after /

¶ And as they satte atte souper these foure knygtes / thre of Page  360 [leaf 180v] them spak alle shame by Cornysshe knyghtes /

¶ Syr Tristram herd alle that they saide / and he sayd but lytell / but he thoughte the more / but at that tyme he discouerd not his name / Vpon the morne sir Tristram took his hors / and abode them vpon their way / And there syre Brandyles proferd to Iuste with sir Tristram / and sir Tristram smote hym doune hors and alle to the erthe / Thenne sire Tor le fyse de vayshoure encountred with syre Tristram / and there sire Tristram smote hym doune / and thenne he rode his waye / and sir kay folowed hym / but he wold not of his felauship / Thenne sire Brandyles came to sir kay / and said I wold wete fayne what is that knyghtes name / Come on with me said sir kay / and we shall praye hym to telle vs his name / Soo they rode to gyders / tylle they came nyghe hym / and thenne they were ware where he sat by a welle / and had putte of his helme to drynke at the welle And whanne he sawe them come / he laced on his helme lyghtly / and took his hors / and proferd hem to Iuste / Nay said syre Brandyles we Iusted late ynough with you / we come not in that entent / But for this we come to requyre you of knyghthode to telle vs your name / My fayre knyghtes sythen that is your desyre / and to please you ye shal wete that my name is sir Tristram de lyones neuewe vnto kynge Mark of Cornewayle / In good tyme saide sire Brandyles / and wel be ye fonden / and wete ye wel that we be ryght gladde that we haue fonde you / and we be of a felauship that wold be ryȝt glad of your company / For ye are the knyghte in the world that the noble felauship of the round table mooste desyreth to haue the company of / God thanke them said sir Tristram of theyre grete goodenes / but as yet I feale wel that I am vnabyl to be of their felauship / For I was neuer yet of suche dedes of worthynes to be in the company of suche a felauship / A sayde sire kay and ye be syre Trystram de lyones ye are the man called now moost of prowesse excepte sir launcelot du lake / For he bereth not the lyf crysten ne hethen that can fynde suche another knyght to speke of his prowesse and of his handes and his trouthe with alle / For yet coude there neuer creature saye of hym dishonour and make hit good /

¶ Thus they talked a grete whyle / and thenne they departed eyther from Page  361 [leaf 181r] other suche weyes as hem semed best /

¶ Capitulum xvj /

NOw shall ye here what was the cause that kynge Arthur cam in to the forest perillous / that was in Northwalys by the meanes of a lady / her name was Annowre / and this lady came to kynge Arthur at Cardyf / and she by fayre promyse and fayre bihestes maade kynge Arthur to ryde with her in to that forest perillous / and she was a grete sorceresse / and many dayes she hadde loued kynge arthur / and by cause she wold haue hym to lye by her / she came in to that Countrey / Soo whanne the kynge was gone with her / many of his knyghtes folowed after kynge arthur / whan they myst hym / as sir launcelot Braundyles and many other / and when she had brought hym to her toure / she desyred hym to lye by her and thenne the kynge remembryd hym of his lady / and wold not lye by her for no crafte that she coude doo / Thenne euery daye she wolde make hym ryde in to that forest with his owne knyghtes to the entent to haue had kynge arthur slayne / For whan this lady annoure sawe that she myȝt not haue hym at her wille / thenne she laboured by fals meanes to haue destroyed kynge arthur and slayne / Thenne the lady of the lake that was alwey frendely to kynge arthur / she vnderstoode by her subtyl craftes that kynge arthur was lyke to be destroyed And therfore this lady of the lake that hyght Nyneue cam in to that forest to seke after sire Launcelot du lake / or sire Tristram for to helpe kynge arthur / for as that same day this lady of the lake knewe wel that kynge arthur shold be slayne / onles that he hadde helpe of one of these two knyȝtes / and thus she rode vp and doune tyl she mette with sire Tristram / and anone as she sawe hym / she knewe hym / O my lord sir Tristram she said well be ye mette / and blessid be the tyme that I haue mette with you / for this same day / and within these two houres shalle be done the foulest dede that euer was done in this land O fair damoysel said sir Tristram maye I amende hit / Come on with me she said and that in alle tha haste ye maye / for ye shal see the most worshipfullest knyȝt of the world hard bestad Page  362 [leaf 181v]

¶ Thenne said sire Tristram I am redy to helpe suche a noble man / he is neither better ne wers said the lady of the lake but the noble kynge Arthur hym self / God defende said sir Trystram that euer he shold be in suche distresse / Thenne they rode to gyders a grete pas vntyl they came to a lytel turret a castel / & vndernethe that castel they sawe a knyghte standynge vpon foote fyghtynge with two knyghtes / And soo sir Tristram biheld them / and at the laste the two knyghtes smote doune the one knyghte / and that one of hem vnlaced his helme to haue slayne hym / And the lady Annoure gat kyng Arthurs suerd in her hand to haue stryken of his hede / And there with alle came sire Tristram with alle his myghte / cryenge / Traytresse / Traitresse leue that / And anone there sire Tristram smote the one of the knyghtes thorou the body that he felle dede / and thēne he rasshed to the other / and smote his bak in sonder / and in the meane whyle the lady of the lake cryed to kyng Arthur lete not that fals lady escape / Thenne kynge Arthur ouertoke her / and with the same swerd he smote of her heed / and the lady of the lake took vp her heed and henge it vp by the heyre of her sadel bowe / And thenne sir Tristram horsed kyng Arthur / and rode forth with hym / but he charged the lady of the lake not to discouer his name as at that tyme / Whan the kynge was horsed / he thanked hertely sire Tristram / and desyred to wete his name / but he wold not telle hym / but that he was a poure knyght auenturous / and soo he bare kynge Arthur felauship tyl he met with somme of his knyghtes / And within a whyle he mette with sir Ector de marys / and he knewe not kynge Arthur nor sir Tristram / and he desyred to Iuste with one of hem / Thenne sire Tristram rode vnto sir Ector / and smote hym from his hors / And whanne he hadde done soo / he cam ageyne to the kynge / and said my lord yonder is one of your knghtes / he may bere you felauship / and another day that dede that I haue done for you I truste to god ye shalle vnderstande that I wold do you seruyse / Allas said kyng Arthur lete me wete what ye are / Not at this tyme said sir Tristram / Soo he departed and lefte kynge Arthur and sir Ector to gyders Page  363 [leaf 182r]

¶ Capitulum xvij

ANd thenne at a day sette sire Tristram and sire Lamorak mette at the welle / and thenne they took kehydius at the fosters hous / and soo they rode with hym to the ship / where they lefte dame Brangwayne and Gouernayle and soo they sayled in to Cornewaile all holy to gyders / and by assent and enformacyon of dame Brangwayn whan thye were landed they rode vnto sire Dynas the seneschal / a trusty frende of sir Tristrams / and so dame Brangwayne and syre Dynas rode to the courte of kynge Marke / and told the quene la Beale Isoud that sir tristram was nyghe her in that countrey / thenne for very pure Ioye la beale Isoud swouned / & whan she myghte speke / she said gentyl knyȝt Seneschall help that I myght speke with hym / outher my herte wille brast /

¶ Thenne sir Dynas and dame Brangwayne broughte syre tristram and kehydius pryuely vnto the courte vnto a chambre where as la beale Isoud hadde assygned hit / and to telle the ioyes that were betwixe la beale Isoud and sire tristram / there is no tonge can telle it / nor herte thynke hit / nor pen wryte hit / And as the Frensshe book maketh mencyon at the fyrst tyme that euer sir kehydius sawe la beale Isoud / he was soo enamoured vpon her / that for very pure loue he myghte neuer withdrawe hit / And at the last as ye shall here or the book be ended / sire Kehydius dyed for loue of la beale Isoud / and thenne pryuely he wrote vnto her lettres and ballades of the moost goodlyest that were vsed in tho dayes /

¶ And whanne La beale Isoud vnderstood his letters she hadde pyte of his cōplaynt / and vnauysed she wrote another letter to comforte hym with alle / And sire tristram was alle this whyle in a turret at the commaundement of la beale Isoud / and whan she myght / she came vnto sire tristram / So on a day kynge Mark played at the chesse vnder a chamber wyndowe / and at that tyme sire tristram and sire Kehydius were within the chamber ouer Kyng Marke / and as it myshapped sir tristram fonde the letter that Kehydius sent vnto la beale Isoud / also he had foūd the letter that she wrote vnto Kehydius / & at that same tyme la Beale Isoud was in the same chamber / Thenne sir tristram Page  364 [leaf 182v] came vnto la Beale Isoud and said / Madame here is a letter that was sente vnto you / and here is the letter that ye sent vnto hym that sente you that letter / Allas madame the good loue that I haue loued you / and many landes and rychesse haue I forsaken for your loue / and now ye are a traytresse to me the whiche dothe me grete payne / but as for the sir kehydius I broughte the oute of Bretayne in to this Coūtrey / and thy fader kynge Howel I wanne his landes / how be it I wedded thy syster Isoud le blaunche maynys for the goodenes she dyd vnto me / And yet as I am true knyghte she is a clene mayden for me / but wete thou wel syr Kehydius for this falshede and treason thou hast done me / I wille reuenge hit vpon the / And there with alle sir Tristram drewe oute his swerd / and said sire kehydius kepe the / and thenne la Beale Isoud swouned to the erthe / And whanne sir kehydius sawe sir tristram come vpon hym / he sawe none other bote / but lepte oute at a bay wyndowe euen ouer the hede where sat kynge Marke playenge at the chesses / And whanne the kynge sawe one come hurlynge ouer his hede / he sayd / Felawe what arte thou / and what is the cause thou lepest oute at that wyndowe /

¶ My lord the kynge said Kehydius / hit fortuned me that I was a slepe in the wyndowe aboue your hede / and as I slepte I slommeryd / and soo I felle doune / And thus sir kehydius excused hym

¶ Capitulum xviij

THenne sir Tristram dredde sore lest he were discouerd vnto the kynge that he was there / wherfore he drewe hym to the strengthe of the Toure / and armed hym in suche armour as he had to fyghte with hem that wold withstande hym / And soo whanne sire Tristram sawe / there was no resystence ageynst hym / he sente Gouernaile for his hors and his spere / and knyghtely he rode forth oute of the castel openly that was called the castel of Tyntagil / And euen atte gate he mette with Gyngalyn syr Gawayns sone / And anone sir Gyngalyn putte his spere in his reyste / and ranne vpon sire Trystram and brake his spere / and sire Tristram at that Page  365 [leaf 183r] tyme had but a swerd / and gaf hym suche a buffet vpon the helme that he fylle doune from his sadel / and his swerd slode adoune / and carf a sonder his hors neck / And soo sire tristram rode his waye in to the forest / and alle this doynge sawe kyng Mark / And thenne he sente a squyer vnto the hurte knyghte and commaunded hym to come to hym / and soo he dyd / And whanne kynge Marke wyst that it was sir Gyngalyn / he welcomed hym / and gaf hym an hors / and asked hym what knyght hit was that had encoūtred with hym / Syr said sir gyngalyn / I wote not what knyȝt he was / but wel I wote that he sygheth and maketh grete dole / Thenne sir Tristram within a whyle mette with a knyght of his owne that hyghte sir Fergus / And whan he had mette with hym he made grete sorowe in so moche that he felle doune of his hors in a swoune / and in suche sorowe he was in thre dayes and thre nyghtes / Thenne at the laste sir Tristram sent vnto the courte by sir Fergus for to spere what tydynges / And so as he rode by the way he met with a damoysel that came from sir Palamydes to knowe and seke how sir Tristram dyd / Thenne sir Fergus told her / how he was al most out of his mynde /

¶ Allas said the damoysel where shalle I fynde hym / In suche a place said sire Fergus

¶ Thenne sir Fergus fond Quene Isoud seke in her bedde / makynge the grettest dole that euer ony erthely woman made And whan the damoysel fonde sire Tristram / she made grete dole by cause she myȝt not amende hym / for the more she made of hym / the more was his payne / And at the last sir Tristram toke his hors and rode aweye from her / And thenne was it thre dayes or that she coude fynde hym / And thenne she broughte hym mete and drynke / but he wold none / and thenne another tyme sir Tristram escaped awey from the damoysel / and it happed hym to ryde by the same castel where sire Palamydes and sir Tristram dyd bataille whan la beale Isoud departed them / And there by fortune the damoysel mette with sire Tristram ageyne makynge the grettest dole that euer erthely creature made / and she yede to the lady of that castel / and tolde her of the mysauenture of sire Tristram / allas said the lady of that castel where is my lord sir tristram / Ryght here by your castel said the damoysel / In good tyme saide the lady / is he soo nyghe me / he Page  366 [leaf 183v] shalle haue mete and drynke of the best / and an harp I haue of his / where vpon he taught me / For of goodely harpynge he bereth the pryce in the world / So this lady and damoisel brought hym mete and drynke / but he ete lytel therof / Thenne vpon a nyght he putte his hors from hym / And thenne he vnlaced his armour / and thenne sir Tristram wold go in to the wildernesse and brast doune the trees and bowes / and other-whyle whan he fond the harp that the lady sente hym / thenne wold he harpe and playe therupon / and wepe to gyders / and somtyme whan sire Tristram was in the woode that the lady wyst not where he was / thenne wold she sytte her doune and playe vpon that harp / Thenne wold sire Tristram come to that harp / and herken ther to / and somtyme he wold harpe hym self Thus he there endured a quarter of a yere / thēne at the last he ranne his way / and she wiste not where he was become / And thenne was he naked and waxed lene / and poure of flesshe / and soo he felle in the felauship of herd men and sheepherdes / and dayly they wold gyue hym somme of their mete / & drynke / And whan he dyd ony shrewd dede / they wold bete hym with roddes / and soo they clypped hym with sheres and made hym lyke a foole

¶ Capitulum xix

ANd vpon a day Dagonet kynge Arthurs foole came in to Cornewaile with two squyers with hym / and as they rode thorugh that forest / they came to a fayre welle / where sir Tristram was wonte to be / and the whether was hote / and they alyghte to drynke of that welle / and in the meane whyle their horses brake lous /

¶ Ryght soo sire Tristram came vnto them / and fyrst he sousyd sire Dagonet in that welle / & after his squyers / and there at lough the sheepherdes / and forth with al he ranne after their horses and broughte hem ageyne / one by one / and ryghte soo wete as they were / he made hem lepe vp / and ryde their wayes /

¶ Thus sire Tristram endured there an halfe yere naked / and wold neuer come in town / ne vyllage / The meane whyle the damoysel that syre Palomydes sente to seke sir Tristram she yede vnto sir Palomydes / and told Page  367 [leaf 184r] hym alle the meschyef that sir Tristram endured / Allas sayd sir Palomydes hit is grete pyte that euer soo noble a Knyght shold be soo mescheued for the loue af a lady / But neuertheles I wille goo and seke hym / and comforte hym and I may

¶ Thenne a lytel before that tyme la Beale Isoud had commaunded sir Kehydius oute of the Countrey of Cornewaile / Soo sir Kehydius departed with a dolorous herte / and by aduenture he mette with sir Palomydes / and they enfelaushypped to gyder / and eyther complayned to other of theire hote loue that they loued la beale Isoud / Now lete vs said sir Palomydes seke sire tristram that loued her as wel as we / and lete vs preue whether we maye recouer hym / Soo they rode in to that forest / and thre dayes and thre nyghtes they wold neuer take their lodgynge but euer soughte sir tristram / And vpon a tyme by aduenture they mette with Kynge Mark that was ryden from hys men al alone / whanne they sawe hym / syre palomydes knewe hym / but sir Kehydius knewe hym not / A fals kynge said sir Palomydes / it is pyte thou hast thy lyf / For thou arte a destroyer of alle worshipful Knyghtes / and by thy meschyef and thy vengeaunce thou hast destroyed the mooste noble Knyght sire tristram de lyones / And therfor defende the said sir Palomydes / for thou shalt dye this day / that were shame said Kyng Mark / for ye two are armed and I am vnarmed / As for that said sir Palomydes I shalle fynde a remedy therfore / here is a Knyȝt with me / and thou shalt haue his harneis / Nay said kyng Mark I wille not haue adoo with yow for cause haue ye none to me / For alle the mysease that sir tristram hath / was for a letter that he fond / for as to me I dyd to hym no displeasyre / and god knoweth I am ful sory for his disease and malady / Soo when the kyng had thus excused hym / they were frendes / and kyng Mark wold haue had them vnto tyntagil / but syr Palomydes wolde not but torned vnto the Realme of Logrys / and sir kehydius saide that he wolde goo in to Bretayn /

¶ Now torne we vnto sir Dagonet ayene that whanne he and his squyers were vpon horsbak / he demyd that the sheepherdes had sente that soole to araye hem so / by cause that they laughed at hem / and soo they rode vnto the kepers of beestes and alle to bete them / Syr tristram sawe them bete Page  368 [leaf 184v] that were wonte to gyue hym mete and drynke / thenne he ran thyder / and gat sir Dagonet by the hede / and gaf hym suche a falle to the erthe / that he brysed hym sore so that he lay stylle / And thenne he wrast his swerd oute of his hand / And therwith he ranne to one of his squyers / and smote of his hede / & the other fled / And soo sir Tristram took his waye with that swerd in his hand rennynge as he hadde ben wylde woode /

¶ Thenne sir Dagonet rode to kyng Mark and told hym hou he had spedde in that forest / And therfore said sir Dagonet / Beware kynge Mark that thou come not aboute that welle / in the forest / For there is a foole naked / and that foole and I foole mette to gyders / and he hadde almost slayn me /

¶ A said kynge Mark / that is sir Matto le breune / that felle oute of his wytte by cause he lost his lady / For whan sir Gaherys smote doune sir Matto and wanne his lady of hym / Neuer syns was he in his mynde / and that was pyte / for he was a good knyght /

¶ Capitulum xx

THenne sir Andred that was cosyn vnto sir Tristram / made a lady that was his peramour to say and to noyse hit that she was with sire Tristram or euer he dyed / And this tale she broughte vnto kynge markes courte that she buryed hym by a welle / and that or he dyed / he besoughte kynge Marke to make his cosyn sir Andred kynge of the countre of Lyonas / of the whiche sir Trystram was lord of / Alle this dyd sir Andred by cause he wold haue had sire tristrams lādes /

¶ And whanne kynge Mark herd telle / that sir tristram was dede / he wepte / and made grete dole / But whanne quene Isoud herd of these tydynges / she maade suche sorowe / that she was nyghe oute of her mynde / And soo vpon a daye she thought to slee her self / and neuer to lyue after sir tristrams deth And soo vpon a day la beale Isoud gat a swerd pryuely / and bare hit in to her gardyn / and there she pyghte the swerd thorugh a plumme tree vp to the hyltes / soo that hit stak fast and hit stode brest hyhe / And as she wold haue ronne vpon the swerd and to haue slayne her self /

¶ Alle this aspyed kyng Page  369 [leaf 185r] Marke / how she kneled doune and saide / swete lord Ihesu haue mercy vpon me / for I maye not lyue after the dethe of syr Tristram de lyones / for he was my fyrst loue / and he shalle be the last / and with these wordes came Kyng mark and took her in his armes / and thenne he took vp the swerd / and bare her away with hym in to a Toure / and there he made her to be kept and watched her surely / and after that she lay longe seke nyȝ at the poynte of dethe / This meane whyle ranne sir Tristram naked in the forest with the swerd in his hand / and soo he cam to an hermytage / and there he leid hym doun and slepte / and in the meane whyle the heremyte stale aweye his swerd / and leid mete doune by hym / Thus was he kepte there a ten dayes And at the last he departed and came to the herd men ageyne / And there was a gyaunt in that countre that hyght Tawleas And for fere of sir Tristram more than seuen yere he durst neuer moche goo at large / but for the moost party he kepte hym in a sure castel of his owne / and soo this Tauleas herd telle / that sir Tristram was dede by the noyse of the courte of kynge Marke / Thenne this Tauleas wente dayly at large / And soo he happed vpon a daye he came to the herd men wandryng and langerynge / And there he sette hym doun to reste among them The meane whyle ther cam a knyght of Cornewaile that ledde a lady with hym / and his name was sir Dynaunt / & whanne the gyaunt sawe hym / he wente from the herd men and hydde hym vnder a tree / and soo the knyght came to that welle / and there he alyghte to repose hym / And as soone as he was from his hors / this gyaunt Tauleas came betwixe this knyght and his hors / and toke the hors and lepte vpon hym / So forth with he rode vnto sir Dynaunt / and took hym by the coller / & pulled hym afore hym vpon his hors / and there wolde haue stryken of his hede / Thenne the herd men said vnto sire Tristram / helpe yonder knyght / helpe ye hym seid sir tristram / we dare not said the herd men / Thenne sir tristram was ware of the swerd of the knyght there as hit lay / and soo thyder he ranne / and took vp the swerd and stroke of sir tauleas hede and so he yede his way to the herd men

¶ Capitulum xxj

Page  370 [leaf 185v]

THenne the knyght took vp the gyaunts hede / and bare hit with hym vnto kynge Marke / and told hym / what aduenture betyd hym in the forest / and how a naked man rescowed hym / from the grymly gyaunt Tauleas where hadde ye this aduenture said kynge Marke / forsothe said syr Dynaunt at the fayre fontayne in your foreste / where many aduenturous knyȝtes mete / and there is the madde man wel said kyng Mark I wille see that wild man / So within a day or two kynge Marke commaunded his knyghtes / & his hunters that they shold be redy on the morne for to hunte / and soo vpon the morne he wente vnto that forest / And whanne the kynge came to that welle / he fonde there lyenge by that welle a fayr naked man / and a swerd by hym / Thenne kyng Mark blewe and straked / and there with his knyghtes came to hym / and thenne the kynge commaunded his knyghtes to take that naked man with fayrenes / and brynge hym to my castel / Soo they did saufly & fayre and cast mantels vpon sir Tristram and soo ledde hym vnto Tyntagyll / and there they bathed hym and wasshed hym and gaf hym hote suppynges til they had brought hym wel to his remembraunce / but alle this whyle there was no creature that knewe sir Tristram nor what man he was / Soo hit felle vpon a daye that the quene la beale Isoud herd of suche a man / that ranne naked in the foreste / and how the kynge had brought hym home to the Courte / Thenne la Beale Isoud called vnto her dame Brangwayne and said come on with me / For we wille goo see this man / that my lord brought from the forest the last daye / So they passed forthe / and spered where was the seke man / And thenne a squyer told the quene that he was in the gardyn / takynge his rest / and repose hym ageynst the sonne / Soo whan the quene loked vpon sir Tristram she was not remembryd of hym / but euer she seid vnto dame Brangwayne / me semeth I shold haue sene hym here to fore in many places / but as soone as sir Tristram sawe her / he knewe her wel ynough / And thenne he torned awey his vysage / and wepte / Thenne the quene hadde alweyes a lytel brachet with her that sir Tristram gaf her the fyrst tyme that euer she came in to Cornewaile / & neuer wold that brachet departe from her / but yf syre Tristram was nyghe Page  371 [leaf 186r] there as was la Beale Isoud / and this brachet was sente from the kynges doughter of Fraunce vnto syre Tristram for grete loue / and anone as this lytel brachet felte a saueour of syr Tristram she lepte vpon hym and lycked his learys and his erys / and thēne he whyned and quested and she smelled at his feet and at his handes / and on all partyes of his body that she myghte come to / A my lady sayd dame Brangwayn vnto la beale Isoud / Allas allas said she I see it is myn own lord syr Tristram / And therupon Isoud felle doune in a swoune and soo laye a grete whyle / And whan she myght speke she said / my lord sir Tristram blessid be god ye haue your lyf / and now I am sure ye shalle be discouerd by this lytel brachet / for she wille neuer leue you / And also I am sure as soone as my lord kynge Mark doo knowe you / he wil bannyssh you oute of the countrey of Cornewaile / or els he will destroye you / For goddes sake myn owne lord / graunte kynge Marke his wille / and thenne drawe you vnto the Courte of kyng arthur / for there are ye byloued / and euer whan I maye I shalle sende vnto you / And whan ye lyst ye may come to me / and at alle tymes erly and late I wille be at your commaundement / to lyue as poure a lyf as euer dyd quene or lady / O madame said sir Tristram goo from me / for mykel anger and daunger haue I escaped for your loue

¶ Capitulum xxij

THenne the quene departed / but the brachet wold not from hym / and there with alle came kynge Marke and the brachet sat vpon hym / and bayed at them all / There with al syr Andred spak and said syr this is sir Tristram I see by the brachet / Nay said the kyng I can not suppose that / Thenne the kyng asked hym vpon his feith what he was / and what was was his name /

¶ So god me help said he / my name is sir Tristram de lyones / now do by me what ye lyst / A saide kyng Mark me repenteth of your recouer / & thenne he lete calle his barons to Iuge sir Tristram to the dethe / thēne many of his barons wold not assente therto / and in especyal syr Dynas the seneschal / & sir Fergus / And so by thaduyse of them al sir Tristram was banysshed out of the coūtrey for x yere / & therupon he took his oth vpon a book before the kyng & his barons / Page  372 [leaf 186v] And soo he was made to departe oute of the Countrey of Cornewaile / and there were many barons brought hym vnto hys shyp / of the whiche somme were his frendes / & somme his foes / And in the meane whyle there came a knyghte of kynge Arthurs / his name was Dynadan / and his comyng was for to seke after sir Tristram / thenne they shewed hym where he was armed at alle poyntes goynge to the shyp / Now fayre knyȝte said sir Dynadan or ye passe this courte that ye will Iuste with me / I requyre the / with a good wille said sir Tristram / & these lordes wille gyue me leue / Thenne the Barons graunted therto / and soo they ranne to gyders / and there sire Tristram gaf sire Dynadan a falle / And thenne he praid sir Tristram to gyue hym leue to goo in his felauship / ye shalle be ryght welcome said thenne sire Tristram / and soo they took theyr horses and rode to their shyppes to gyders / and whanne sire Tristram was in the see / he said / Grete wel kyng Marke and all myn enemyes / and saye hem I wille come ageyne whan I maye / And wel am I rewarded for the fyghtynge with sire Marhaus / and delyuerd all this countrey from seruage / and wel am I rewarded for the fetchyng and costes of Quene Isoud oute of Irland / and the daunger that I was in fyrst & last and by the way comynge home what daunger I had to brynge ageyne Quene Isoud from the castel Pluere / and well I am rewarded whanne I foughte with sir Bleoberys for syre Segwarydes wyf / and well am I rewarded whan I fouȝt with syre Blamore de ganys for kynge Anguysshe / fader vnto la Beale Isoud / and well am I rewarded whan I smote doune the good knyghte syre Lamorak de galys at Kyng Markes request / And wel am I rewarded whan I fought with the kynge with the honderd knyghtes / and the kynge of Northgalys / and bothe these wold haue put his land in seruage / and by me they were put to a rebuke / and wel I am rewarded for the sleynge of Tauleas the myghty gyaunte and many other dedes haue I done for hym / and now haue I my waryson / And telle Kynge Mark that many noble knyghtes of the table roūd haue spared the barons of this countrey for my sake / Also am I not wel rewarded whan I fought with the good knyght sir Palomydes and rescowed quene Isoud Page  373 [leaf 187r] from hym / And at that tyme kynge Marke said afore all his barons I shold haue ben better rewarded / nad forth with alle he took the see /

 
 
 

 

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