XI

(Winchester f. 305v-346v; Caxton X.74-XII.14; Vinaver, Vol. 2, pp. 746.1-846.5; Shepherd pp. 440.21-495.14)

 
 
 
 

f. 305v (X.74)

 

Than there was a cry vnto all knyghtes made that whan

they herde the horne blow they sholde make Justes as

they ded the fyrste And lyke as the brethirne Sir Edwarde

and Sir Sadok be gan the Justys the fyrste day Sir vwayne

the kyngis son vryen and Sir Lucanere de butlere be gan the

Justis the secunde day And at the fyrste encountir Sir vway//

ne smote downe the kynge of Sc^ottys And sir Lucanere ran a

yenste the kynge of walys and they brake there spearys all

to pecis and they were so fyrse bothe that they hurteled there

horsys to gydir that bothe felle to the erthe // Than they off

Orkeney horsed a gayne Sir Lucanere And than cam in Syr

Trystram de lyones and smote downe Sir vwayne and Sir

Lucanere And Sir Palomydes smote downe othir ·ij knyghtes

And than cam Sir Gareth and smote downe othir ·ij· good

knyghtes Than seyde kynge Arthure vnto Sir Launcelott

A se yondir ·iij· knyghtes do passyngly well and namely the

fyrste that Justed // Sir seyde sir Launcelot that knyght be gan nat

yet but ye shall se hym do mervaylously And than cam in to

the place the knyghtes of Orkeney And than they be gan to

do many dedys of armys // whan Sir Trystram saw them

so be gyn he seyde to Sir Palomydes how feele ye youre

selff may ye do this day as ye ded yestirday // Nay seyde sir

Palomydes I feele my selff so wery and so sore brused of the

dedis of yestirday that I may nat endure as I ded // That me

repentyth seyde Sir Trystram for I shall lacke you this day

but helpe youre selff seyde Sir Palomydes and truste nat

to me for I may nat do as I ded And all thes wordis seyde sir

Palomydes but to be gyle Sir Trystram Than seyde sir

Trystram vnto Sir Gareth than muste I truste vppon you

where fore I pray you be nat farre fro me to rescow me

and nede be // Sir I shall nat fayle you seyde Sir Gareth


f. 306 (X.74)

 

in all that I may do // Than Sir Palomydes rode by hym

selff And than in despyte of Sir Trystram he put hym

selff in the thyckyst prees a monges them of Orkeney And

there he ded so mervaylous dedis of armys that all men had

wondir of hym for there myght none stonde hym a stroke ·

whan Sir Trystram saw Sir Palomydes do suche dedys

he mervayled and sayde to hym selff me thynkyth he is wery

of my company // So sir Trystram be hylde hym a grete

whyle and ded but lytyll ellys for the noyse and cry was

so grete that Sir Trystram mervayled frome whens cam

the strengthe that Sir Palomydes had there // Sir seyde

Sir Gareth vnto Sir Trystram remembir ye nat of the

wordis that Sir Dynadan seyde to you yestir day whan he

called you cowarde parde sir he seyde hit for none ylle for ye

ar the man in the worlde that he lovyth beste and all that

he seyde was for youre worshyp // And there fore seyde sir

Gareth lat me know this day what ye be and wondir ye

nat so vppon Sir Palomydes for he forsyth hym selff

to wynne all the honoure frome you // I may well be leve

hit seyde Sir Trystram and sytthyn I vndirstonde his yevil

wyll and hys envy ye shall se yf that I enforce my selff

that the noyse shall be leffte that is now vppon hym Than

Sir Tyrstram rode in to the thyckyst of the prees and

than he ded so mervaylously well and ded so grete dedis

of armys that all men seyde that Sir Trystram ded dow//

ble so muche dedys of armys as ded Sir Palomydes a

fore hande And than the noyse wente clene frome sir

Palomydes and all the people cryed vppon Sir Trys//

tram And seyde A Jhu a se how Sir Trystram smytyth

wyth hys speare so many knyghtes to the erthe And se

seyde they all how many knyghtes he smyth smytyth downe


f. 306v (X.74-5)

 

wyth his swerde and how many knyghtes he racith of there

helmys and there shyldys and so he bete all of Orkeney a

fore hym // how now seyde Sir Launcelot vnto kynge

Arthure I tolde you that thys day there wolde a knyght

play his pageaunte for yondir rydyth a knyght ye may

se he dothe all knyghtly for he hath strengthe and wyn//

de I nowe // So god me helpe seyde kynge Arthure to

Sir Launcelot ye sey sothe for I sawe neuer a bettir knyȝt

for he passyth farre Sir Palomydes // Sir wyte you

well seyde Sir Launcelot hit muste be so of ryght for hit is

hym selff that noble knyght sir Trystram I may ryght well

be lyeve hit seyde kynge Arthure but whan Sir Palomy//

des harde the noyse and he cry was turned frome hym he

rode oute on the tone syde and be hylde Sir Trystram and

whan he saw hym do so mervaylously well he wepte passyngly

sore for dispyte for he wyst well than he sholde wyn no wor//

shyp that day For well knew Sir Palomydes whan Sir

Trystram wolde put forthe his strengthe and his manhode

that he sholde gete but lytyll worshyp that day // Than cam

kynge Arthure And the kynge of northe galys and sir Launce//

lot du lake and Sir Bleoberys and Sir Bors de ganys

and Sir Ector de marys thes ·iij·knyghtes cam in to the fylde

wyth Sir Launcelot and so they ·iiij· ded so grete dedys of armys

that all the noyse be gan vppon Sir Launcelot and so they bete

the kynge of walys and the kynge of Scottys far a backe and

made them to voyde the fylde But Sir Trystram and Sir

Gareth a bode styll in the fylde and endured all that euer there

cam that all men had wondir that euer ony knyght endured so

many grete strokys But euer sir Launcelot and hys kynnes//

men for bare Sir Trystram and Sir Gareth Than seyde

kynge Arthure ys that Sir Palomydes that enduryth so well


f. 307 (X.75)

 

Nay seyde Sir Launcelot wyte you well hit ys the good knyȝt

Sir Trystram for yondir ye may se Sir Palomydes be holdyth

and hovyth and doth lytyll or naught And sir ye shall vndirston//

de that Sir Trystram wenyth this day to beate vs all oute

of the fylde And as for me seyde Sir Launcelot I shall nat me//

te hym mete hym who so wyll But sir seyde Sir Launcelot

ye may se how Sir Palomydes hovyth yondir as Þouȝe he we//

re in a dreame And wyte you well he ys full hevy that sir

Trystram doyth suche dedys of armys Than ys he but a

foole seyde kynge Arthure for neuer yet was Sir Palomy//

des suche a knyght nor neuer shall be of suche proves And yf

he have envy at Sir Trystram seyde kynge Arthure and com//

myth in wyth hym vppon his syde he ys a false knyght · And

as the kynge and Sir Launcelot thus spake Sir Trystram

rode pryvayly oute of the prees that no man aspyed hym

but labeall Isode and Sir Palomydes for they ·ij wolde nat

leve off there yȝe syght of hym // And whan Sir Trystram

cam to his pavylons he founde Sir Dynadan in hys bedde

a slepe · A wake seyde Sir Trystram for ye ought to be a sha//

med so to slepe whan knyghtes haue a do in the fylde // Than//

Sir Dynadan a rose lyghtly and sayde sir what wyll ye do

make you redy seyde Sir Trystram to ryde wyth me in to

the fylde // So whan Sir Dynadan was armed he loked

vppon Sir Trystrames helme and on hys shylde And whan

he saw so many strokys vppon his helme and vppon hys shyl//

de he seyde in good tyme was I thus a slepe for had I bene

wyth you I muste nedys for shame haue folowed wyth

you more for shame than for any proves that ys in me

For I se well now be thy strokys that I sholde haue bene tru//

ly beatyn as I was yestirday // leve youre Japys seyde Sir

Trystram and com of that we were in the fylde a gayne


f. 307v (X.75-6)

 

What sayde Sir Dynadan ys youre harte vp now ·yestirday

ye fared as ye had dremed // So than Sir Tyrstram was a

rayed all in blacke harneys A Jhu seyde Sir Dynadan what

ayleth you thys day me semyth that ye be more wyldar than

ye were yestirday // Than smyled Sir Trystram and seyde

to Sir Dynadan a wayte well vppon me yf ye se me ovir

macched and loke that euer ye be by hynde me and I shall make

you redy way by goddys grace // So they toke there horsys

And all thys aspyed Sir Palomydes bothe the goynge and

the comynge And so ded la beall Isode for she knew Sir Tyrs//

tram passynge well // Than Sir Palomydes sawe that sir

Trystram was disgysed and thought to shame hym And so he

rode vnto a knyght that was sore wounded that sate vndir

a thorne a good way frome the fylde // Syr knyght seyde sir

Palomydes I pray you to lende me youre armour and youre

shylde for myne ys ouer well knowyn in thys fylde and that

hath done me grete damayge And ye shall haue myne

armour and my shylde that ys as sure as youres · I woll well

seyde the knyght that ye haue myne armoure and also my

shylde yf they may do you ony a vayle I am well pleased //

So sir Palomydes armed hym hastely in that knyghtes armour

and hys shylde that shone lyke ony crystall or syluer and so

he cam rydynge in to the fylde And than there was nothir

Sir Trystram nothir none of hys party nothir of kynge

Arthurs that knew Sir Palomydes And as sone as he

was com in to the fylde Sir Trystram smote downe ·iij·

knyghtes evyn in the syght of Sir Palomydes And than he

rode a yenste Sir Trystram and aythir mette othir wyth

grete spearys that they all to braste to there hondys And

than they daysshed to gedir wyth swerdys egirly // Tha Sir

Trystram had mervayle what knyght he was that ded batayle


f. 308 (X.76)

 

so myghtyly wyth hym // Than was Sir Trystram wrothe

for he felte hym passynge stronge and he demed that he cow//

de nat haue a do wyth the remenaunte of the knyghtes by cause

of the strengthe of Sir Palomydes So they laysshed to gydyrs

and gaff many sad strokys to gydyrs and many knyghtys mer//

vayled what knyght he was that so encountred wyth the blak

knyght Sir Trystram And full well knew la beall Isode that

hit was Sir Palomydes that faught wyth Sir Trystram

for she aspyed all in her wyndow where that she stood how Sir

Palomydes chaunged hys harnes wyth the wounded knyȝt

And than she be gan to wepe so hertely for the dyspyte of Sir

Palomydes that well nyȝe there she sowned // Than cam

in Sir Launcelot wyth the knyghtes of Orkeney And whan

the todir party had a spyed Sir Launcelot they cryed and seyde

returne for here commyth Sir Launcelot So there cam in a

knyght vnto Sir Launcelot and seyde sir ye muste nedis fyȝt

wyth yondyr knyght in the blak harneyes whyche was Sir

Trystram for he hath all moste ouer com that good knyghte

that fyghtyth wyth hym wyth the syluer shylde whyche was

Sir Palomydes Than Sir Launcelot rode be twyxte them

and Sir Launcelot seyde vnto Sir Palomydes sir knyghte

let me haue this batayle for ye haue nede to be reposed //

Sir Palomydes knew well Sir Launcelot and so ded Sir

Trystram But by cause Sir Launcelot was farre hardyer

knyght and bygger than Sir Palomydes he was ryght

glad to suffir Sir Launcelot to fyght wyth Sir Trystram

for well wyste he that Sir Launcelot knew nat sir Trystram

and there fore he hoped that Sir Launcelot sholde beate oÞer

shame Sir Trystram and there of Sir Palomydes was

full fayne · And so Sir Launcelot laysshed at Sir Trystram

many sad strokys But Sir Launcelot knew nat sir Trystram


f. 308v (X.76)

 

but Sir Trystram knew well Sir Lncelot And thus they

faught longe to gydyrs whyche made la beall Isode well nyȝe

oute of her mynde for sorow Than Sir Dynadan tolde Sir

Gareth how that knyght in the blak harneys was there lorde

Sir Trystram and that othir ys Sir Launcelot that fyghtyth

wyth hym that muste nedys haue the bettyr of hym for sir

Trystram hath had ouer muche travayle this day Than lat

vs smyte hym downe seyde Sir Gareth so hit is beste that

we do seyde Sir Dynadan rathir than Sir Trystrams

sholde be shamed for yondir hovyth the straune knyghte

wyth the syluer shylde to falle vppon Sir Trystram yf nede

be And so furth wyth all Sir Gareth russhed vppon Sir

Launcelot and gaff hym a grete stroke vppon the helme Þat

he was a stoned And than cam in Sir Dynadan wyth

hys speare and he smote Sir Launcelot suche a buffet Þat

horse and man yode to the erthe and had a grete falle //

Now fye for shame seyde Sir Trystram vnto sir Gareth

and Sir Dynadan why ded ye so to smyte a downe soo

good a knyght as he ys and namely whn I had a do

wyth hym A Jhu ye do youre selff grete shame and hym

no disworshyp for I hylde hym resonabely hote though ye

had nat holpyn me Than cam sir Palomydes whyche

was disgysed and smote downe sir Dynadan frome hys

horse Than sir Launcelot by cause Sir Dynadan had

smyttyn hym downe a fore honde there fore he assayled

sir Dynadan passynge sore And sir Dynadan deffended

hym myghtyly But well vndirstood sir Trystram

that sir Dynadan myght nat endure a yenste sir

Launcelot where fore sir Trystram was sory Than

cam sir Palomydes freysshe vppon sir Trystram And

whan he saw sir Palomydes com so freyshly he thouȝt

 

 

 

                                    To delyuer


f. 309 (X.76)

 

to delyuer hym at onys by cause that he wolde helpe

sir Dynadan that stoode in perell wyth Sir Launcelot Than

sir Trystram hurteled vnto sir Palomydes and gaff hym a

grete buffet And than Sir Trystram gate sir Palomydes

and pulled hym downe vndir nethe his horse feete // And

than Sir Trystram lyghtly lepe vp and leffte sir Palo//

mydes and wente be twyxte sir Launcelot and sir Dy//

nadan and than they be gan to do batayle to gydyrs // And

ryght so sir Dynadan gate sir Trystrams hrose and seyde

on hyght that sir Launcelot myght hyre // My lorde Sir

Trystram take youre horse And whan sir Launcelot

harde hym name sir Trystram A Jhu what haue I do//

ne seyde sir Launcelot for now am I dishonoured and sey//

de a my lorde sir Trystram why were ye now disgysed

ye haue put youre selff this day in grete perell But

I pray you to pardon me for and I had knowyn you we

had nat done this batayle // Sir seyde sir Trystrams

this is nat the fyrste kyndenes and goodnes that ye

haue shewed vnto me And a none then were horsed

bothe a gayne So all the people on that one syde

gaff sir Launcelot the honoure and the gre and all the

people on the othir syde gaff sir Trystram the honoure

and the gre But sir Launcelot seyde nay there to for

I am nat worthy to haue this honoure for I woll re//

porte me to all knyghtes that sir Trystram hath bene

lenger in the fylde than I and he hath smyttyn downe

many mo knyghtes this day than I haue done And Þer

fore I woll gyff sir Trystram my voyse and my na//

me And so I pray all my lordys and felowys so to do

Than there was the hole voyse of kyngys deukes and

erlys barons and knyghtes that sir Trystram de lyones


f. 309v (X.76-7)

 

thys day ys preved the beste knyght Than they blewe

vnto lodgynge And quene Isode was lad vnto her pa//

velons But wyte you well she was wrothe oute of

mesure wyth sir Palomydes for she saw all his treson

frome the begynnynge to the endynge And all thys

whyle neythir sir Trystram sir Gareth nothir Sir

Dynadan knew nat of the treson of sir Palomydes

But aftirward ye shall hyre how there be felle the

grettyst de bate be twyxte sir Trystram and sir Palo//

mydes that myght be // So whan the turnemente

was done sir Trystram sir Gareth and sir Dynadan

rode wyth la beall Isode to his pavelons and euer sir

Palomydes rode wyth them in there company disgy//

sed as he was // But whan sir Trystram had a spyed

hym that he was the same knyght wyth the shylde

of syluer that hylde hym so hote that day Than seyde

Trystram sir knyght wyte Þou well here ys none

that hath nede of youre felyshyp and there fore I

pray you departe frome vs // Than sir Palomydes an//

swered a gayne as though he had nat knowyn sir Trys//

tram wyte Þou well sir knyght that frome this fely//

shyp woll I nat departe for one of the beste knyghtys

of the worlde commaunded me to be in this company

And tyll that he discharge me of my seruyse I woll nat

be discharged // So by his langayge sir Trystram knew

that hit was sir Palomydes And seyde A sir ar ye such

a knyght ye haue be named wronge for ye haue ben

called euer a Jantyll knyght And as this day ye haue

shewed me grete vn Jantylnes for ye had all moste

brought me to my dethe but as for you I suppose I

shoulde haue done well I nowȝe But sir Launcelot with


f. 310 (X.77)

 

you was ouer muche for I know no knyght lyvynge but sir

Launcelot ys to ouer good for hym and he woll do hys

vtteryst Alas seyde sir Palomydes ar ye my lorde sir

Trystram yee sir and that know you well I now Be

my knyghthod seyde sir Palomydes vntyll now I knew

you nat For I wote that ye had bene the kynge off

Irelonde for well I wote that ye bare his armys I ba//

re his armys seyde sir Trystram and that woll I a byde bye

for I wanne them onys in a fylde of a full noble knyght whos

name was sir Marhalte and wyth grete payne I wan that

knyght for there was none othir recouer but Sir Marhalte

dyed thorow false lechis and yet was he neuer yoldyn to me / sir

seyde sir Palomydes I wente that ye had bene turned vppon sir

Launcelottys party and that caused me to turne // ye sey well seyde

Sir Trystram and so I take you and for gyff you // So than they

rode to there pavelons And whan they were a lyght they vnar//

med them and wysshe there facis and there hondys and so yode

vnto mete and were set at there table // But whan la beall Iso//

de saw sir Palomydes she chaunged than her coloures for wra//

the she myght nat speake Anone sir Tran Trystram a spyed her

countenaunce and seyde madame for what cause make ye vs such

chere we haue bene sore travayled all thys day // Myne owne lor//

de la beall Isode for goddys sake be ye nat displeased wyth me

for I may none othir wyse do // I sawe thys day how ye were be

trayed and nyȝe brought vnto youre dethe truly sir I sawe euery

dele how and in what wyse And there fore sir how sholde I suffir

in youre presence suche a feloune and traytoure as ys sir Palo//

mydes for I saw hym wyth myne yen how he be hylde you whan

ye wente oute of the fylde for euer he hoved stylle vppon his horse

tyll that he saw you com a gayne warde And than furth wyth all

I saw hym ryde to the hurte knyght and chaunged hys harneys with


f. 310v (X.77-8)

 

hym and than streyte I saw hym how he sought you all the fylde

And anone as he had founde you he encountred wyth you And

wylfully sir Palomydes ded batayle wyth you And as for

hym sir was nat gretly a ferde but I drad sore sir Launcelot

whyche knew nat you // Madame seyde sir Palomydes ye may

say what ye woll I may nat contrary you but be my knyghthod

I knew nat my lorde Sir Trystram No forse seyde sir Trystram

vnto sir Palomydes I woll take youre exscuse but well I wote

ye spared me but a lytyll but no forse all ys pardoned as on

my party Than la beall Isode hylde downe her hede and seyde

no more at that tyme And there wyth all ·ij· knyghtes armed

come vnto the pavelon and there they a lyght bothe and cam

in armed at all pecis // Fayre knyghtes seyde sir Trystram ye

ar to blame to com thus armed at all pecis vppon me whyle

we ar at oure mete And yf ye wolde ony thynge wyth vs

whan we were in the fylde there myght ye haue eased youre

hertys · Not so sir seyde the tone of tho knyghtes we com nat for

that entente But wyte you well sir Trystram we be com as

youre frendys And I am comyn hydir for to se you And this knyȝt

ys comyn for to se youre quene Isode Than seyde sir Trystram

I requyre you do of your helmys that I may se you // Sir Þat woll

we do at youre desyre seyde the knyghtes And whan Þer helmys

were of sir Trystram thought Þat he sholde know them Than spa//

ke sir Dynadan prevayly vnto sir Trystram that is my lorde

kynge Arthure And that oÞer that spake to you fyrst ys my lorde

sir Launcelot A madame I pray you aryse seyde sir Trystram for

here ys my lorde kynge Arthure Than Þe kynge and the quene

kyssed And sir Launcelot And sir Trystram enbraced aythir oÞer in ar//

mys and than Þer was Joy wyth oute mesure and at Þe requeste

of la beall Isode the kynge and sir Launcelot were vnarmed and

than there was myry talkynge // Madame seyde kynge Arthur


f. 311 (X.78)

 

hit is many a day a go sytthyn I desyred fyrst to se you for ye haue

bene praysed so fayre a lady And now I dare say ye ar Þe fayryste

that euer I sawe And sir Trystram ys as fayre and as good a knyȝt

as ony that I know And there fore me semyth ye ar well be sett

to gydir // Sir god thanke you seyde sir Trystram and la beall

Isode of youre goodnes and of youre larges ye ar pyerles · And

thus they talked of many thyngys and of all the hole Justes But

for what cause seyde kynge Arthure were ye sir Trystram a yenst

vs and ye ar a knyght of the table rounde and of ryght ye sholde

haue bene with vs Sir seyde sir Trystram here ys sir Dynadan and

sir Gareth youre owne nev nevew caused me to be a yenst you //

My lorde Arthure seyde sir Gareth I may beare well for my bak

ys brode I nowȝe But for sothe hit was sir Trystrams owne

dedis Be god that may I repente seyde sir Dynadan for thys

vnhappy sir Trystram brought vs to this turnemente & many

grete buffettys he hath caused vs to haue Than the kynge &

sir Launcelot that vnnethe they myght sytte // But what knyght

was that seyde kynge Arthure that hylde you so shorte // Sir

seyde sir Trystram here he syttyth at this table // what seyde

kynge Arthure was hit sir Palomydes // Sir wyte you well

that hit was he seyde la beall Isode So god me helpe seyde kyng

Arthure that was vnknyghtly done of you as of so good a knyȝt

for I haue harde many people calle you a curtayse knyght // Sir

seyde sir Palomydes I knew nat sir Trystram for he was so disgy//

sed So god helpe me seyde sir Launcelot hit may well be for I knew

hym nat my selff But I mervayled whye ye turned on oure party

Sir hit was done for the same cause seyde sir Launcelot // Syr

as for that seyde sir Trystram I haue pardouned hym And I wolde

be ryght lothe to leve hys felyshyp for I love ryght well hys

company And so they leffte of and talked of oÞer thynges And in the

evenynge kynge Arthure and sir Launcelot departed vnto Þer lodgyng


f. 311v (X.78-9)

 

But wyte you well sir Palomydes had grete envy hartely for

all that nyght he had neuer reste in his bed but wayled & wepte

oute of mesure // So on Þe morne sir Trystram sir Gareth and sir

Dynadan arose early and went vnto sir Palomydes chambir

and there they founde hym faste a slepe for he had all nyght

wacched was sene vppon his chekes that he had wepte full sore

Say ye no thynge seyde sir Trystram for I am sure he hath ta//

kyn angir and sorow for the rebuke that I gaff hym and la be//

all Isode Tthan sir Trystram let calle sir Palomydes and bade

hym make redy for hit was tyme to go to the fylde and anon

they armed them and clothed them all in rede bothe la beall

Isode and all the felyshyp and so they lad her passynge freysshly

thorow the fylde in ^to the pryory where was hir lodgynge And

anone they harde ·iij· blastes blowe And euery kynge and knyghtdres//

sed hym to the fylde And the fyrste that was redy to Juste was

sir Palomydes and sir Kaynes le straunge a knyght of the table

rounde and so the ij· encountyrd to gydyrs but sir Palomydes

smote sir Kaynes so harde that he bare hym qy quyte ouer his horse

croupe And furthe with all sir Palomydes smote downe a nothir

knyght and brake his speare and than pulled oute hys swerde

and ded wondirly well And than the noyse be gan gretly vppon

sir Palomydes lo seyde kynge Arthur yondir sir Palomydes be

gynnyth to play his play So god me helpe seyde kynge Arthur

he is a passynge goode knyght And ryght as they stood talkynge

thus · In cam sir Trystram as thundir And he encountird wyth

sir kay le senesciall And Þer he smote hym downe quyte frome his

horse and wyth that same speare he smote downe ·iij· knyghtes

more And than he pulled oute his swerde and ded mervaylous//

ly Than Þe noyse and the cry chonged fro sir Palomydes and

turned vnto sir Trystram And than all the people cryed ·A

Trystram A Trystram And than was sir Palomydes clene


f. 312 (X.79)

 

for gotyn how now seyde sir Launcelot vnto kynge Arthure yondyr

Rydyth a knyght that playyth his pageauntes // So god me help

seyde kynge Arthure ye shall se this day that yondir ·ij knyghtes

shall do here wondirs Sir seyde sir Launcelot the tone knyghte

waytyth vppon the toÞer and enforsyth hym selff thorow envy to

passe sir Trystram and he knowyth nat the prevy envy of sir Pa//

lomydes for sir all Þat sir Trystram doth is thorow clene knyghthod

And than sir Gareth and sir Dynadan ded ryght woll that day Þat

kynge Arthure spake of them grete worshyp and kynges and the

knyghtes on sir Trystrams syde ded passynge well and hylde them

truly togydyrs Than kynge Arthure and sir Launcelot toke Þer

horsys and dressed them to the fylde a monge the thyckeste of the

prees And Þer sir Trystram vnknowyn smote downe kynge Arthur

And than sir Launcelot wolde haue rescowed hym but there were

so many vppon sir Launcelot that they pulled hym downe from his

horse And than the kynge of Irelonde and the kynge of Scottes

with Þer knyghtes ded Þer payne to take kynge Arthure and sir Launcelot

presoners · whan sir Launcelot harde them sey so he fared as hit had

bene an hungry lyon for he fared so that no knyght durst nyȝe hym

Than cam sir Ector de marys And he bare a speare a yenst sir Pa//

lomydes and braste hit vppon hym all to shyvyrs And than Sir

Ector cam a gayne and gaff sir Palomydes suche a daysshe with a

swerde Þat he stowped a downe vppon his sadyll bowe and forth wyth

all sir Ector pulled downe sir Palomydes vndir his horse fyete

And than he horsed sir Launcelot But sir Palomydes lepe be fore &

gate Þe horse by Þe brydyll and lepe in to the sadyll // So god me

helpe seyde sir Launcelot ye ar bettir worthy to haue Þat horse than

I // Than sir Ector brought sir Launcelot a noÞer horse Graunte

mercy seyde sir Launcelot vnto his broÞer And so whan he was hor//

sed a gayne with one speare he smote downe ·iiij· good knyghtes And

than sir Launcelot gate kynge Arthure a good horse // Than kyng


f. 312v (X.79-80)

 

Arthure and sir Launcelot wyth a feawe of his knyghtes of sir Launce//

lottis kynne ded mervaylouse dedis of armys for that tyme as Þe

booke recordyth sir Launcelot smote downe and pulled downe ·

xxxti· knyghtes Nat withstondynge Þeer parte hylde them so faste to

gydir Than kynge Arthure and his knyghtes were ouer macched //

And whan sir Trystram saw that what laboure kynge Arthure &

his knyghtes And in especiall the grete noble dedis Þat sir Launcelott

ded with hys owne hondis // Than sir Trystram called vnto hym sir

Palomydes sir Gareth and sir Dynadan and seyde thus to them my

fayre fealowys wyte you well that I wl turne vnto kynge Ar//

thure party for I saw neuer so feawe men do so well And hit woll be sha//

me vnto vs that bene knyghtes of Þe rounde table to se oure lorde

kynge Arthure and that noble knyght sir Launcelot to be dishonoured

Sir hit wyll be well do seyde sir Gareth and sir Dynadan Sir do your

beste seyde sir Palomydes for I woll nat chaunge my parrty that I

cam in wyth all · That is for envy of me seyde sir Trystram but

god spede you well in your Journey And so departed sir Palomydes

frome them // Than sir Trystram sir Gareth and sir Dynadan tur//

ned with sir Launcelot And than sir Launcelot smote downe the kynge

of Irelonde quyte frome his horse And he smote downe Þe kyng

of Scottes and the kynge walys And than Þe kynge Arthure ran

vnto sir Palomydes and smote hym quyte from his horse And

than sir Trystram bare downe all Þat euer he mette wyth all And

sir Gareth and sir Dynadan ded there as noble knyghtes And anone

all the todir party be gan to fle // Alas seyde sri Palomydes that euer

I sholde se this day for now I haue loste all the worshyp that I

wan And than sir Palomydes wente hys way waylynge and so

wyth drewe hym tylle he cam to a welle and there he put his

horse from hym and ded of his armoure and wayled & wepte

lyke as he had bene a wood man Than they gaff the pryce vn//

to sir Trystram many knyghtes and there were many mo that


f. 313 (X.80)

 

gaff the pryce vnto sir Launcelot // Now fayre lordys I thanke

you of youre honoure that ye wolde gyff me but I pray you

hartely that ye woll gyff youre voyce vnto sir Launcelot for be

my fayth I woll gyff sir Launcelot my voyce seyde sir Trystram

But sir Launcelot wolde none of hit and so the pryce was gyffyn

be twyxte them bothe And so euery man rode to his lodgynge And

sir Bleoberysandsir Ectorrodewythsir Trystram and la beall

Isode vnto her pavelons Than as sir Palomydes was at the

welle waylynge and wepynge there cam fleynge the kynge

of walys and of Scotlonde And they sawe sir Palomydes in

that rayge // Alas seyde they so noble a man as ye be sholde

be in this aray And than the kynge gate sir Palomydes

horse a gayne and made hym to arme hym and mownte

vppon his horse a gayne and so he rode wyth them makyng

grete dole // So whan sir Palomydes cam nyȝ sir Trystram

and la beall Isode pavelons Than sir Palomydes pray the ij

kynges to a byde hym there the whyle that he spake wyth sir

Trystram And whan he cam to the porte of the pavelon

sir Palomydes seyde an hyȝe where art Þou sir Trystram de

lyones sir seyde sir Dynadan that ys sir Palomydes // what si

Palomydes woll ye nat com nere a monge vs // Fye on the

traytoure seyde sir Palomydes for wyte Þou well and hit

were day lyght as hit is nyght I sholde sle the my nawne

hondis And yf euer I may gete the seyde sir Palomydes Þou

shalt dye for this dayes dede // Sir Palomydes seyde Sir

Trystram ye wyte me wyth wronge for had ye done as

I ded ye sholde haue had worshyp But sytthyn ye gyff me

so large warnynge I shall be well ware of you // Fye on

the traytoure seyde sir Palomydes and there wyth all he

departed // Than on the morne sir Trystram and la beall Iso//

de sir Bleoberys sir Ector de marys sir Gareth and sir Dynadan


f.313v (X.90-1)

 

what by londe and by watir they brought la beall Isode vnto

Joyus garde and there they reposed them a ·vij· nyght and

made all the myrthis and desportys that they cowde

devyse And kynge Arthure and his knyght drew vnto

Camelot And sir Palomydes rode wyth the ·ij· kynges

and euer he made the grettyst dole that ony man cowde

thynke for he was nat all only so dolorous for the de//

partynge frome la beall Isode but he was as sorowful

a parte to go frome the felyshyp of sir Trystram for he

was so kynde and so Jantyll that whan sir Palomydes

remembyrd hym he myght neuer be myrry So at the

vij·nyghtes ende sir Bleoberys sir Ector departed frome

sir Trystram and frome the quene and thes ·ij· knyghtes

had grete gyfftys And euer sir Gareth and sir Dynadan

a bode wyth sir Trystram And whan sir Bleoberys &

sir Ector were comyn there as quene Gwenyuer was

lodged in a castell by the se syde And thorow the grace

of god the quene was recovirde of hir malady Than

she asked the ·ij· knyghtes fro whens they cam And they sey//

de they cam frome sir Trystram and frome la beall Isode

how doth sir Trystram seyde the quene and la beall Isode

Truly madame seyde tho knyghtes he doth as a noble

knyght shulde do And as for the quene she is pyerles

of all ladyes for to speake of her beaute bounte and

myrthe andof hir goodnes we sawe neuer hir macche

as far as we haue ryddyn and gone A mercy Jhu

seyde quene Gwenyvir thus seyth all folkys that hath

sene her and spokyn wyth her God wolde seyde she Þat

I had parte of her condycions And was now mysse for//

tuned me of my syknesse whyle that turnemente en//

dured for as I suppose I shall neuer se in all my lyff such 


f. 314 (X.81-2)

 

a semble of noble knyghtes and fayre ladyes And than Þe

knyghtes tolde the quene how sir Palomydes wan Þe gre

the fyrste day wyth grete nobles And the secunde day

sir Trystram wan the gre And the thirde day sir Launce//

lot wan the gre // well seyde quene Gwenyvir who ded

beste all iij·dayes So god me help seyde thes knyghtes

sir Launcelot and sir Trystram had there leste dishonour

And wyte you well sir Palomydes ded passyngly well

ad myghtyly but he turned a yenste the party that he

cam in wyth all and that caused hym to loose a grete

parte of his worshyp for hit semed that sir Palomydes

ys passynge envyous Than shall he neuer wynne wor//

shyp seyde the quene for and hyt happyn an envyous

man onys to wynne worshyp he shall be dishonoured

twyse there fore And for this cause all men of wor//

shyp hate an envyous man and woll shewe hym no

favoure And he that ys curteyse and kynde and Jantil

hath favoure in euery place // Now leve we of this ma//

ter and speke we of sir Palomydes that rode and lodged

wyth the ·ij· kynges all that nyght And on the morne sir

Palomydes departed frome the ·ij·kynges where of they

were hevy Than the kynge of Irelonde lente a man

of his to sir Palomydes and gaff hym a grete courser

And the kynge of Scotlonde gaff hym grete gyfftes

and fayne they wolde haue had hym a byde wyth

them but he wolde nat in no wyse And so he departed

and rode as adventures wolde gyde hym tyll hitte

was nyȝe none And than in a foreyste by a well sir

Palomydes saw where lay a fayre wounded knyght

and his horse bounden by hym And that knyght ma//

de the grettyst dole that euer he herde man make for


f. 314v (X.82)

 

euer he wepte and there wyth syghed as he wolde dye // Than

sir Palomydes rode nere hym and salewed hym myldely and

sayde fayre knyght why wayle you so lat me lye downe by

you and wayle also // For dowte ye nat I am mche more hevy//

ar than ye ar for I dare say seyde sir Pa Palomydes that

my sorow ys an ·C· folde more than youres ys and there fore

lat vs complayne aythir to oÞer // Fyrst seyde the woundid knyȝt

I requyre you telle me youre name for and Þou be none of Þe

noble knyghtesÞou shalt neuer know my name what som euer com

of me // Fayre knyght seyde sir Palomydes suche as I am be

hit bettir be hit worse wyte Þou well that my name ys sir

Palomydes sunne and ayre vnto kynge Asclabor and sir Saphir

and sir Segwarydes ar my ·ij· brethirne And wyte Þou well

as for my selff I was neuer crystynde but my ·ij· brethirne ar

truly crystynde // A noble knyght seyde that woundid knyght

well ys me that I haue mette wyth you And wyte you well

that my name ys sir Epynogrys the kynges sonne of northum//

birlonde // Now sytte ye downe seyde sir Epynogrys and let

vs aythir complayne to othir Than sir Palomydes a lyght

and tyed his horse faste And thus sir Palomydes be gan hys

complaynte and sayde now shall I tell you what wo I endure

I love the fayryst quene and lady that euer bare lyff And wyte

you well her name ys la beall Isode kynge Markes wyff of

Cornwayle That ys grete foly seyde sir Epynogrys for to love

quene Isode for one of the beste knyghtes of the worlde lovyth

her that ys sir Trystram de lyones That ys trouthe seyde sir

Palomydes for no man knowyth that mater bettir than I

do for I haue bene in sir Trystrams felyshyp this moneth and

more And wyth la beall Isode to gydyrs And alas seyde Sir

Palomydes vn happy man that I am now haue I loste Þe fely//

shyp of sir Trystram and the love of la beall Isode for euer And


f. 315 (X.82-3)

 

I am neuer lykly to se her more And sir Trystram and I bene aythir

to othir mortall enemyes // well seyde sir Epynogrys syth that

ye loved la beall Isode loved she euer you a gayne by ony thynge

that ye cowde wyte othir ellys ded ye euer reioyse her in ony ple//

sure // Nay be my knyghthode seyde sir Palomydes for I neuer a

spyed that euer she loved me more than all the worlde ded nor

neuer had I pleasure wyth her But the laste day she gaff me Þe

grettyst rebuke that euer I had whyche shall neuer go fro my harte

and yet I well deseruyd that rebuke for I ded nat knyghtly And

there for I haue loste the love of her and of sir Trystram for

euer and I haue many tymes enforsed my selff to do many dedis

of armys for her sake And euer she was the causer of my worship

wynnynge And alas now haue I loste all the worshyp that euer

I wanne for neuer shall be falle me suche proves as I had in Þe

felyshyp of sir Trystram Nay nay seyde sir Epynogrys youre

sorow ys but Japys to my sorow for I reioysed my lady and wan

her wyth myne hondis and loste her a gayne Alas that day //

And fyrst thus I wan her my lady was an Erlys doughtir And

as the Erle and ·ij· knyghtes whyche cam home fro the turnement

of Loneȝep and for her sake I sette vppon this Erle my selff and

on his ·ij·knyghtes and my lady there beynge presente and so by

fortune there I slew the erle and one of the knyghtes And the

othir knyght fledde And so that nyght I had my lady And on

the morne as she and I reposed vs at this welle syde Than

cam Þer to me an arraunte knyght his name was sir Helyor

le prewse an hardy knyght And he chalenged me to fyght

for my lady And than we wente to batayle fyrst vppon horse

backe and aftir vppon foote // But at the laste sir Helyor woun//

ded me so that he lefft me for dede and so he toke my lady with

hym and thus my sorow ys more than youres for I haue re//

ioysed an ye nevir reioysed That ys trouthe seyde sir Palomydes


f. 315v (X.83)

 

But syth I can nat recouer myslf I shall promyse you yf I can

mete with sir Helyor that I shall gete to you your lady a gayne oÞer

ellys he shall beate me Than sir Palomydes made sir Epyno//

grys to take his horse and so they rode vntyll an Ermytage

And Þer siir Epynogrys rested hym And in Þe meane whyle sir

Palomydes walked prevayly oute to reste hym vnder the

levis And Þer be sydes he sawe a knyght com rydynge wyth

a shylde Þat he had sene sir Ector de marys beare a fore honde

and Þer cam aftir hym a ·x· knyghtes and so thes knyghtes hoved

vndir Þe levys for hete And a none aftir Þer cam a knyght with

a grene shylde And Þer in a whyȝt lyon ledynge a lady vppon

a palfrey Than this knyght with the shylde he semed to be

maystir of Þe ·x· knyghtes And he rode fyersly aftir sir Helyor

for hit was he Þat hurte sir Epynogrys And whan he cam

nyȝ sir Helyor he bade hym deffende his lady I woll deffend

her seyde sir Helyor vnto my power and so they ran to gydirs

so myghtyly Þat ayÞer smote oÞer downe horse and all to the erth

And than they wan vp lyghtly and drewe swerdys & dressed

Þer shyldis and laysshed to gydyrs wondir fyersly more than

an owre And all this sir Palomydes saw and be hylde but

euer at Þe laste the knyght with sir Ectors shylde was far bigger

And at the laste he smote downe sir Helyor And than Þat knyght

vn laced his helme to haue strykyn off his hede And than he

cryed mercy and prayed hym to save his lyff and bade hym

take his lady Than sir Palomydes dressed hym vp by cause

he wyste well that Þat same lady was sir Epynogrys lady And

he had promysed hym to helpe hym Than sir Palomydes went

streyte to that lady and toke her by the honde and asked her

wheÞer she ^knew a knyght whyche was called sir Epynogrys Alas she

seyde that evir I knew hym oÞer he me for I haue for his sake

loste my worshyp And also his lyff that greveth me moste 

 

f. 316 (X.83-4)

 

of all // Nat so fayre lady sayde sir Palomydes commyth on with

me for here ys sir Epynogrys in this Ermytage A well ys

me seyde Þat lady and he be on lyve // Than cam Þe toÞer knyght

and seyde whythir wolt Þou with Þat lady // I woll do wyth her

what me lyste seyde sir Palomydes // wyte Þou well seyde Þat

knyght Þou spekyst ouer large Þouȝe Þou semyst Þou haste me

at a vauntayge by cause Þou sawyst me do batayle but late

Þou wenyste sir knyght to haue Þat lady a way fro me so lyghtly

Nay thynke hit neuer and Þou were as good a knyght as ys

sir Launcelot or sir Trystram oÞer ellys sir Palomydes but Þou

shalt wyn her more derar than euer ded I And so they wente

vnto batayle vppon foote and Þer they gaff many sad strokys

to gydir and aythir wounded oÞer wondirly sore And thus they

faught to gydir styll more than an owre Than sir Palomy//

des had mervayle what knyght he myght be that was so

stronge and so well brethid durynge And at Þe laste thus

seyde sir Palomydes knyght I requyre the telle me thy name

wyte Þou well seyde that knyght I dare telle the my name

so Þat Þou wolt tell me thy name // I woll seyde sir Palomy//

des Truly seyde Þat knyght and my name ys sir Sir Saphir

sonne of kynge Asclabor And sir Palomydes and sir Segwary//

des ar my breÞerne // Now and wyte Þou well my name ys

sir Palomydes Than sir Saphir kneled a downe vppon his kne//

is and prayde hym of mercy And than they vnlaced Þer helmys

and aythir kyssed oÞer wepynge And Þe meane whyle sir Epy//

nogrys rose of his bedde and harde them by the strokys &

so he armed hym to helpe sir Palomydes yf nede were

Than sir Palomydes toke the lady by the honde and brought

her to sir Epynogrys and there was grete Joy be twyxte

them for aythir sowned for Joy whan they were mette

Now fayre knyght and lady sayde sir Saphir hit were


f. 316v (X.84)

 

pite to departe you too And Þer fore Jhu sende you Joy ayÞer of othir

Graunte mercy Jantyll knyght seyde sir Epynogrys and muche

more thanke to my lorde sir Palomydes that thus hath tho//

row his proves made me to gete my lady Than sir Epyno//

grys requyred sir Palomydes and sir Saffir broÞer to ryde with

hym vnto his castell for the sauff garde of his persone // Syr

seyde sir Palomydes we woll be redy to conduyte you be cau//

se Þat ye ar sore woundid And so was sir Epynogrys and hys

lady horsed vppon a soffte ambler And than they rode vnto

his castell and there they had grete chere and grete Joy as

euer sir Palomydes and sir Saffir had in Þer lyvys So on the

morne sir Saphir and sir Palomydes departed and rode //

but as fortune lad them And so they rode all Þat day vntyll

aftir noone And at the laste they harde a grete wepyng

and a grete noyse downe in a maner // Sir seyde sir Saffir

lette vs wyte what noyse this ys I woll well seyde sir

Palomydes And so they rode tyll that they con to a fayre

gate of a maner and there sate an olde man sayynge his

prayers and beadis Than sir Palomydes and sir Saphir

a lyght and leffte Þer horsis and wente with in Þe gatys and

Þer they saw full goodly men wepyng many // Now fayre

sirrys seyde sir Palomydes where fore wepe ye & make

thys sorow And anone one of tho knyghtes of the castel

be hylde sir Palomydes and knew hym And than he

wente to his felowys And sayde fayre fealowys wyte

you well all we haue with in this castell Þe same knyȝt

that slew oure lorde at Loneȝep for I know hym well

for sir Palomydes Than they wente vnto harneys

all that myght beare harneys som on horse bak and

som vppon foote to the numbir of ·iij· score And whan

they were redy they cam freyssly vppon sir Palomydes

 

 

 

                                    And vppon


f. 317 (X.84)

 

and vppon sir Sapir wyth a grete noyse And sayde thus kepe Þe

sir Palomydes for Þou arte knowyn and be ryght Þou muste

be dede for Þou haste slayne oure lorde and Þer fore wyte Þou

well we may do the none oÞer favoure but sle the and there

fore deffende the Than sir Palomyde and sir Saphir the tone

sette his bak to the todir and gaff many sad strokes and also toke

many grete strokes and thus thus they faught wyth ·xxti· knyȝtes

and ·xl· Jantyll men and yomen nyȝe a ·ij· owres But at the

laste though they were neuer so lothe sir Palomydes and sir Saphir

were takyn and yoldyn and put in a stronge preson And with in

iij·dayes ·xij knyghtes passed vppon hym And they founde sir Palo//

mydes gylty and sir Saphir nat gylty of Þe lordis deth // And

whan sir Saphir shulde be delyuerde ther was grete dole be

twyxte his broÞer and hym and many peteous complayntis that

was made at her departicion there ys no maker can reherse Þe

x· parte // Now fayre broÞer lat be youre doloure seyde sir Palo//

mydes and youre sorow for and I be ordeyned to dy a shamfull

dethe well com be hit But and I had wyste of his deth that

I am demed vnto I sholde neuer haue bene yoldyn // So departed sir

Saphir his broÞer with the grettyst sorow that euer made knyght

And on the morne they of the castell ordayned ·xij·knyghtes for

to ryde wyth sir Palomydes vnto the fadir of the same knyght

that sir Palomydes slew and so they bounde his leggys vndir an

olde steedis bealy Andthan they rode wyth sir Palomydes vnto

a castell by the see syde that hyght Pylownes and Þer sir Palomy//

des shulde haue his Justis thus was Þer ordynaunce And so they

rode wyth sir Palomydes faste by the castell of Joyus garde And

as they passed by that castell there cam rydynge one of Þat castell

by them that knew sir Palomydes And whan that knyght saw

hym lad bounden vppon a croked courser Than the knyght asked

sir Palomydes of what cause he was so lad // A my fayre felow


f. 317v (X.84-5)

 

and knyght seyde sir Palomydes I ryde now towarde my dethe

for the sleynge of a knyght at the turnemente of Loneȝep And

yf I had departed frome my lorde sir Trystram as I ought to

haue done now myght I haue bene sure to haue had my lyff

saw saved But I pray you sir knyght recommaunde me vnto

my lorde sir Trystram And vnto my lady quene Isode And sey

to them yf euer I trespast to them I aske them for gyffnes And

also I be seche you recommaunde me vnto my lorde kynge

Arthure and to all the felyshyp of the rounde table vnto my

power Than that knyght wepte for pite And there wyth

he rode vnto Joyus Garde as faste as his horse myght renne

And lyghtly that knyght descended downe of his horse & went

vnto sir Trystram and there he tolde hym all as ye haue

harde and euer the knyght wepte as he were woode // whan

sir Trystram knew how sir Palomydes wente to his dethward

he as hevy to hyre there of And sayde how be hit that I

am wrothe wyth hym yet I woll nat suffir hym to dye so

shamefull a dethe for he ys a full noble knyght And anone

sir Trystram asked his armys And whan he was armed he

toke his horse and ·ij· squyars wyth hym and rode a grete

pace thorow a foreyste aftir sir Palomydes the nexte way

vnto the castell Pelownes where sir Palomydes was Jow//

ged to his dethe And as the ·xij· knyghtes lad hym by fore them

there was the noble knyght sir Launcelot whyche was a lyght

by a welle and had tyed hys horse tyll a tre and had takyn

of hys helme to drynke of that welle and whan he sawe

suche a route whyche semed knyghtes sir Launcelot put on his

helme and suffyrd them to passe by hym And anone he was

ware of sir Palomydes bounden and lad shamfully towarde

his dethe // A Jhu seyde sir Launcelot what mysse adventure

ys be fallyn hym that he ys thus lad towarde hys dethe // yet


f. 318 (X.85)

 

pardens seyde sir Launcelot hit were shame to me to suffir this

noble knyght thus to dye and I myght helpe hym And there

fore I woll helpe hym what som euer com of hit oÞer ellys I

shall dye for hys sake // And than sir Launcelot mounted on

hys horse and gate hys speare in hys honde and rode aftyr

the ·xij· knyghteswhyche lad sir Launcelot Palomydes Fayre

knyghtes sayde sir Launcelot whoÞer lede ye that knyght for hit

be semyth hym full evyll to ryde bounden Than thes ·xij

knyghtes returned suddeynly there horsis and seyde to Sir

Launcelot sir knyght we counceyle you nat to meddyll of this

knyght for he hath deserued deth · and vnto deth he ys Jouged

That me repentyth seyde sir Launcelot that I may nat borow

hym wyth fayrenes for he ys ouer good a knyght to dye such

a shamefull dethe And there fore fayre knyghtes seyde sir

Launcelot than kepe you as well as ye can for I woll res//

cow that knyght othir ellys dye for hit // Than they be gan

to dresse there spearys and sir Launcelot smote the formyste

downe horse and man and so he serued ·iij· mo wyth one spere

and than that speare braste And there wyth all sir Launcelot

drewe his swerde and than he smote on the ryght honde

and on the lyffte honde And so wyth in a whyle he leffto no//

ne of tho knyghtes but he had leyde them to the erthe and Þe

moste party of them were sore wounded And than sir Launcelot

toke the beste horse and lowsed sir Palomydes and sette hym

vppon that horse and so they returned a gayne vnto Joyus

garde And than was sir Palomydes ware of sir Trystram

how he cam rydynge And whan sir Launcelot sy hym he knew

hym well But sir Trystram knew nat hym be cause he had

on his shuldir a gylden shylde // So sir Launcelot made hym

redy to Juste wyth sir Trystram be cause he sholde nat we//

ne that he were sir Launcelot Than sir Palomydes cryed on


f. 318v (X.85-6)

 

lowde to sir Trystram And seyde a my lorde I requyre you

Juste nat wyth this knyght for he hath saved me frome

my dethe // whan sir Trystram harde hym sey so he cam a

soffte trottynge pace towarde hym // And than sir Palomy//

des seyde my lorde sir Trystram muche am I be holdynge vn//

to you of youre grete goodnes that wolde proffir youre noble

body to rescow me vndeserued for I haue greatly offended

you Nat wythstondynge seyde sir Palomydes here mette we

wyth this noble knyght that worshypfully and manly rescow//

ed me frome ·xij· knyghtes and smote them downe all and

sore wounded hem // Fayre knyght seyde sir Trystram vnto

sir Launcelot of whens be ye · I am a knyght arraunte seyde

sir Launcelot that rydyth to seke many dedis // Sir what ys

youre name seyde sir Trystram Sir as at this tyme I woll

nat telle you // Than sir Launcelot seyde vnto sir Trystram

& to sir Palomydes now ar ye mette to gydirs aythir wyth oÞer

and now I woll departe frome you // Nat so seyde sir Trystram

I pray you and requyre you of knyghthod to ryde wyth me

vnto my castell wyte you well seyde sir Launcelot I may nat

ryde wyth you for I haue many dedis to do in oÞer placys Þat

at this tyme I may nat a byde wyth you · A mercy Jhu seyde

sir Trystram I requyre you as ye be a trewe knyght to the

order of knyghthode play you wyth me this nyght // Than

sir Trystram had a graunte of sir Launcelot how be hit thouȝe

he had nat desyred hym he wolde haue rydden with hem

er sone a com aftir hym For sir Launcelot cam for none oÞer

cause in to that contrey but for to se sir Trystram & whan

they were com wyth in Joyus garde they a lyght and there

horsis were lad in to a stable And than they vnarmed

them for sir Launcelot as sone as his helme was of Sir

Trystram and sir Palomydes knew hym // Than Sir


f. 319 (X.86)

 

Trystram toke sir Launcelot In his armys and so ded

la beall Isode And sir Palomydes kneled downe vppon

his kneis and thanked sir Launcelot And whan he sawe

sir Palomydes knele he lyghtly downe vppon his kneis

to toke hym vp and seyde thus wyte Þou well sir Palomy//

des that I and ony knyght in this londe of worshyp mus//

te of verry ryght succoure and rescow so noble a knyȝt

as ye ar preved and renowmed thorouȝe oute all this re//

alme enlonge and ouer twarte Than was Þer grete Joy

a monge them And Þe ofter that sir Palomydes saw la beall

Isode the hevyar he waxed day be day // Than sir Launce//

lot wyth in ·iij· or iiij· dayes departed and wyth hym ro//

de sir Ector de marys and sir Dynadan and sir Palomy//

des was leffte there wyth sir Trystram a ·ij· moneÞis

and more But euer sir Palomydes faded and mourned Þat

all men had merveyle where fore he faded so a way · So

vppon a day in Þe dawnynge sir Palomydes wente in to

the foreste by hym selff a lone And Þer he founde a welle

and a none he loke in to the well and in the watir he

sawe his owne vysayge how he was discolowred and

defaded a no thynge lyke as he was // lorde Jhu what

may this meane seyde sir Palomydes why arte Þou

thus defaded and euer was wonte to be called one of the

fayrest knyghtes of wo^rlde for sothe I woll no more lyve 

this lyff for I love Þat I may neuer gete nor recouer And Þer

wyth all he leyde hym downe by the welle And so be

gan to make a ryme of la beall Isode and of sir Trys//

tram And so in the meane whyle sir Trystram was ryd//

dyn in to the same foreyste to chace an harte of grece

But sir Trystram wolde nat ryde an huntynge neuer


f. 319v (X.86)

 

more vnarmed by cause of sir Brewnys saunȝe pite

And so sir Trystram rode in to the foreyste vp & downe

And as he rode he harde one synge mervaylowsly lowde

And that was sir Palomydes whyche lay by the welle

And than sir Trystram rode sofftly thydir for he demed

that Þer was som knyght arraunte whyche was at Þe

welle // And whan sir Trystram cam nyȝe he descended

downe frome hys horse and tyed his horse faste tyll a

tre And so he cam nere on foote And sone aftir he was

ware where lay sir Palomydes by the welle & sange

lowde and myryly and euer the complayntys were of

la beall Isode whyche was mervaylously well seyde

and pytevously and full dolefully And all the hole

songe sir Trystram harde worde by worde And whan

he had herde all sir Palomydes complaynte he was

wrothe oute of mesure and thought for to sle hym

there as he lay // Than sir Trystram remembyrde

hym selff that sir Palomydes was vnarmed and of

so noble a name that sir Palomydes had And also the

noble th name that hym selff had than he made a

restraynte of his angir And so he wente vnto sir

Palomydes a soffte pace and seyde sir Palomydes

I haue harde youre complayte and of youre treson Þat

ye haue owed me longe and wyte you well there fore

ye shall dye And yf hit were nat for shame of knyȝt//

hode Þou sholdyst nat ascape my hondys for now I

know well you haste a wayted me wyth treson And

there fore seyde sir Trystram tell me how Þou wolt

acquyte the Sir I shall acquyte me thus as for

quene la beall Isode Þou shalt wyte that I love

her a bovyn all oÞer ladyes in this worlde & well


f. 320 (X.86-7)

 

I wote hit shall be falle by me as for her love as be

felle on the noble knyght sir Kay hydyns that dyed for

the love of la beall Isode And now sir Trystram

I woll that ye wyte that I haue loved la beall Isode

many a longe day And she hath bene Þe causer of my

worshyp And ellys I had bene the moste symplyste

knyght in the worlde for by her and by cause of her

I haue wonne Þe worshyp that I haue for whan I

remembred me of quene Isode I wanne Þe worshyp

where some euer I cam for the moste party and yet I had

neuer rewarde noÞer bounte of her dayes of my lyff &

yet I haue bene her knyght longe gwardonles And

there fore sir Trystram as for ony dethe I drede nat

for I had as lyeff dye as lyve And yf I were armed

as ye ar I shulde lyghtly do batayle with the // Sir

well haue ye vttyrd youre treson seyde sir Trystram

Sir I haue done to you no treson seyde sir Palomydes

for love is fre for all men And thouȝe I haue loved your

lady she ys my lady as well as youres how be hyt

that I haue wronge if ony wronge be for ye reioy//

se her and haue youre desyre of her and so had I nevir

nor neuer ys lyke to haue and yet shall I love her to

the vtter muste dayes of my lyff as well as ye //

Than seyde sir Trystram I woll fyght with you to the

vtteryste · I graunte seyde sir Palomydes for in a

bettir quarwll kepe I neuer to fyght for and I dye off

youre hondis of a bettir knyghtes hondys myght I

neuer be slayne And sytthyn I vndirstonde that I

shall neuer reioyse la beall Isode I haue as good wyll

to dye as to lyve // Thatt sette ye a day seyde Sir

Trystram that we shall do batayle Sir this day ·xv


f. 320 (X.87)

 

dayes seyde sir Palomydes I woll mete with you here by in

the medow vnder Joyus garde // Now fye for shame seyde

sir Trystram woll ye sette so longe a day lat vs fyght to

morne // Nat so seyde sir Palomydes for I am megir & haue

bene longe syke for the love of la beall Isode And there fore

I woll repose me tyll I haue my strengthe a gayne // So

than sir Trystram and sir Palomydes promysed faythefully to

mete at the welle that day ·xv· dayes but now I am remem//

bred seyde sir Trystram to sir Palomydes that ye brake me

onys a promyse whan that I rescowed you frome sir Brewnys

saunȝe pite and  ·ix knyghtes and than ye promysed to mete me at

the perowne and the grave be sydis Camelot where as that ty//

me ye fayled of youre promyse wyte you well seyde sir Palomy//

des vnto sir Trystram I was at that day in preson Þat I myght

nat holde my promyse But wyte you well seyde sir Palomydes

I shall you promyse now and kepe hit // So god me helpe seyde

sir Trystram and ye had holden youre promyse this worke had

nat bene here now at this tyme // Ryght so departed sir Trystram

and sir Palomydes And so sir Palomydes toke his horse and hys

harneys and so he rode vnto kynge Arthurs courte and there

he gate hym ·iiij· knyhtes and ·iiij· sargeauntes of armys and so

he returned a gayne vnto Joyus garde And so in the meane whyle

sir Trystram chaced and hunted at all maner of venery and a

boute ·iij dayes a fore the batayle that shulde be · As sir Trystram

chaced an harte there was an archer shotte at the harte and

by mysfortune he smote sir Trystram in the thyk of the thyghe

and the same arrow slew sir Trystrams horse vndir hym ·

whan sir Trystram was so hurte he was passynge hevy And wyte

you well he bled passynge sore And than he toke a noÞer horse

and rode vnto Joyus garde with grete hevynes more for Þe promyse

that he had made vnto sir Palomydes to do batayle with hym


f. 321 (X.87-8)

 

wyth in ·iij· dayes aftir // where fore there was noÞer man

noÞer woman that coude chere hym for euer he demed that sir

Palomydes had smytten hym so be cause he sholde nat be able

to do batayle with hym at the day appoynted But in no wyse Þer

was no knyght a boute sir Trystram that wolde be lyeve that

sir Palomydes wolde hurte hym noÞer by his owne hondis no//

thir by none oÞer consentynge And so whan the ·xv· day was

com sir Palomydes cam to the welle wyth ·iiij· knyghtes wyth

hym of kynge Arthurs courte and ·iij· sargeauntes of armys

And for this entente sir Palomydes brought the knyght with

hym and the sargeauntes of Armys for they sholde beare recor//

de of the batayle be twyxt sir Trystram and hym And one

sargeaunte brought In his helme And the toÞer his speare And

the thirde his swerde // So sir Palomydes cam in to the fylde

and there he a bode nyȝe ·ij· owres And than he sente a squyar

vnto sir Trystram and desyred hym to com in to the fylde to

holde his promyse // whan the squyar was com vnto Joyus gar//

de Anone as sir Trystram harde of his commynge he commaun//

ded that the squyar shulde com to his presence there as he lay

in his bedde // My lorde sir Trystram seyde sir Palomydes squy//

ar wyte you well my lorde sir Palomydes a bydyth you in the

fylde And he wolde wyte wheÞer ye wolde do batayle or nat

A my fayre broÞer seyde sir Trystram wyte you well that I am

ryght hevy for this tydyngis But telle youre lorde sir Palo//

myes and I were well at ease I wolde nat lye here nothir

he sholde haue had no nede to sende for me and I myght othir

ryde or go And for Þou shalt se that I am no lyar sir Trystram

shewed hym his thyȝe and the depnes of the wounde was ·vj·

Inchis depe // And now Þou haste sene my hurte telle thy lorde

that this is no fayned mater And tell hym that I had levir

than all the golde that kynge Arthure hath that I were


f. 321v (X.88)

 

hole And lat hym wyte that as for me as sone as I may ryde I

shall seke hym endelonge and ouertwarte this londe and that I

promyse you as I am a trew knyght And yf euer I may mete hym

telle youre lorde sir Palomydes he shall haue of me hys fylle

of batayle And so the squyar departed And whan sir Palomydes

knew that sir Trystram was hurte than he seyde thus truly

I am glad of his hurte and for this cause for now I am sure

I shall haue no shame for I wote well and we had medled I

sholde haue had harde handelynge of hym and by lyklyhode

I muste nedys haue had the worse for he is the hardyeste

knyght in batayle that now ys lyvynge excepte sir Launcelot

And than departed sir Palomydes where as fortune lad hym &

and with in a moneth sir Trystram was hole of his hurte and

than he toke hys horse and rode frome contrey to contrey

and all sraunge aduentures he encheved where som euer he

rode And all wayes he enquyred for sir Palomydes but off

all that quarter of somer sir Trystram coude neuer mete with

sir Palomydes But thus as sir Trystram soughte and enquyred

aftir sir Palomydes sir Trystram enchevyd many grete batay//

les where thorow all the noyse and brewte felle to sir Trys//

tram and the name ceased of sir Launcelot And there fore sir

Launcelottis breÞerne and his kynnysmen wolde haue slayne

sir Trystram by cause of his same But whan sir Launcelot

wyste how hys kynnysmen were sette he seyde to them opyn//

ly wyte you well that and ony of you all be so hardy to way//

te my lorde sir Trystram wyth ony hurte shame or vylany

as I am trew knyght I shall sle the beste of you all myne

owne hondis // Alas fye for shame sholde ye for his noble

dedys a wayte to sle hym Jhu defende seyde sir Launcelot

that euer ony noble knyght as sir Trystram ys sholde be

destroyed wyth treson // So of this noyse & same sprange


f. 322 (X.88-XI.1)

 

In to Cornwayle nd vnto them of Lyones where of they

were passynge glad and made grete Joy // And than they

of lyones sente lettyrs vnto sir Trystram of recommenda//

cion and many greate gyfftys to mayntene sir Trystrams

astate And euer be twn twene sir Trystram resorted vnto

Joyus garde where as la beall Isode was Þat lovid hym euer

N

Ow leve we sir Trystram de Lyones And speke

we of sir Launcelot du laake And of sir Galahad sir

Launcelottis sonne how he was be gotyn and

in what maner as the booke of frenshe makyth mencion A

fore the tyme that sir Galahad was be gotyn or borne

there cam In an Ermyte vnto kynge Arthure vppon whit//

sonday as the knyghtes sate at the table rounde And whan

the Ermyte saw the syege perelous he asked the kynge

and all the knyghtes why that syege was voyde // Than

kynge Arthure for all the knyghtes answerde and seyde

there shall neuer none sytte in that syege but one but if

he be destroyed // Than seyde the Ermyte sir wote ye

what he ys // Nay seyde kynge Arthure and all Þe knyȝtes

we know nat who he ys yet that shall sytte there // Than

wote I seyde the Ermyte for he that shall sytte there

ys yet vnborne and vn be gotyn And this same yere

he shall be by gotyn that shall sytte in that syege pere//

lous And he shall wynne the Sankgreall // whan this

Ermyte had made this mencion he departed frome Þe cour//

te of kynge Arthure And so aftir this feste sir Launcelot

rode on his aduenture tyll on a tyme by adventure

he paste ouer the Pounte de Corbyn and Þer he saw the

fayryste towre that euer he saw and there vndir was

a fayre lytyll towne full of people and all Þe people


f. 322v (XI.1)

 

men and women cryed at onys well com sir Launcelot Þe

floure of knyghthode for by the we shall be holpyn

oute of daungere // what meane ye seyde sir Launce//

lot that ye cry this vppon me // A fayre knyght seyde

they all here is wyth in this towre a dolerous lady

that hath bene Þer in paynes many wyntyrs & dayes

for euer she boyleth in scaldynge watir And but late seyde

all the people sir Gawayne was here and he myght nat

helpe her and so he leffte her in payne stylle paraduenture

so may I seyde sir Launcelot leve her in payne as well as

sir Gawayne Nay seyde the people we know well that

hit ye ye sir Launcelot that shall delyuer her // well sey//

de sir Launcelot Than telle me what I shall do And so

a none they brought sir Launcelot in to the towre And

whan he cam to the chambir there as this lady was

the doorys of Iron vnloked and vn bolted And so sir

Launcelot wente in to the chambir that was as hote

as ony styew and there sir Launcelot toke the fayryst

lady by the honde that euer he sawe And she was as

naked as a nedyll And by enchauntemente quene

Morgan le fay and the quene of northe galys had

put her there in that paynes by cause she was cal//

led the fayryst lady of that contrey and there she

had bene ·v· yere and neuer myght she be delyuerde

oute of her paynes vnto the tyme the beste knyȝt

of the worlde had takyn her by the honde // Than

the people brought her clothis And whan sche

was a rayed sir Launcelot thought she was Þe fayryst

lady that euer he saw but yf hit were quene Gwe//

nyuer Than this lady seyde to sir Launcelot sir if hit ple//

ase you woll ye go wyth me here by in to a chapel·


f. 323 (XI.1-2)

 

that we may gyff levynge to god // Madame seyde sir

Launcelot commyth on wyth me and I woll go with you

So whan they cam there they gaff thankynges to

god all the people bothe lerned and lewde & seyde

sir knyght syn ye haue delyuerde this lady ye muste

delyuer vs also frome a serpente whyche ys here in a

tombe // Than sir Launcelot toke hys shylde ^& seyde sirrys

brynge me thydir and what that I may do to the ple//

sure of god and of you I shall do So whan sir Launce//

lot com thydir he saw wrytten vppon the tombe wyth

lettyrs of golde that seyde thus here shall com a

lybarde of kynges bloode and he shall sle this serpente

And this lybarde shall engendir a lyon in this forayne

contrey whyche lyon shall passe all oÞer knyghtes Soo

whan sir Launcelot had lyffte vp the tombe there came

oute an orryble and a fyendely dragon spyttynge

wylde fyre oute of hys mowthe Than sir Launcelotte

drew his swerde and faught wyth that dragon longe

And at the laste wyth grete payne sir Launcelot slew

that dragon And there wyth all com kynge Pelles

the good and noble kynge and salewed sir Launcelot

and he hym a gayne // Now fayre knyght seyde the kynge

what is youre name I requyre you of youre knyȝt//

hode telle ye me // Sir seyde sir Launcelot wyte you well

my name ys sir Launcelot du lake And my name ys

kynge Pelles kynge of the forayne contre and cousyn

nyȝe vnto Joseph of Aramathy And than aythir of them

made muche of othir and so they wente in to the castell

to take there repaste And anone there cam In a dove

at a wyndow and in her mowthe Þer semed a lytyl saw//

ser of golde And Þer wyth all there was suche a savour


f. 323v (XI.2)

 

as all the spycery of the worlde had bene there and

furth wyth all there was vppon the table all ma//

ner of meates and drynkes that they coude thynke vp//

pon  So there came in a damesell passynge fayre

and yonge and she bare a vessell of golde be twyxt

her hondis And there to the kynge kneled devoutly

and seyde his prayers and so ded all that were Þer

A Jhu seyde sir Launcelot what may this meane // Sir

seyde the kynge this is the rychyst thynge that ony

man hath lyvynge And whan this thynge gothe a

brode the rounde table shall be brokyn for a season

And wyte you well seyde the kynge this is the holy

Sank greall that ye haue here seyne // So the kynge

and sir Launcelot lad there lyff the moste party of that

day to gydir And fayne wolde kynge Pelles haue

found the meane that sir Launcelot shulde haue ley//

by his doughter fayre Eleyne and for this entente

the kynge knew well that sir Launcelot shulde gete

a pusyll vppon his doughtir whyche shulde be cal//

led sir Galahad the good knyght by whom all Þe fo fo//

rayne cuntrey shulde be brought oute of daunger

And by hym the holy Grayle sholde be encheved // Than

cam furth a lady that hyght dame Brusen and she

seyde vnto the kynge Sir wyte you well sir Launce//

lot lovyth no lady in the worlde but all only quene

Gwenyuer and there fore worche ye be my counceyle

and I shall make hym to lye wyth youre doughter

and he shall nat wyte but that he lyeth by quene

Gwenyuer // A fayre lady sayde the kynge hope ye Þat

ye may brynge this mater a boute // Sir seyde she

vppon payne of my lyff latte me deale for thys


f. 324 (XI.2)

 

dame Brusen was one of the grettyst enchaunters Þat

was that tyme in the worlde And so a none by dame

Brusens wytte she made one to com to sir Launcelot

that he knew well and this man brought a rynge

frome quene Gwenyuer lyke as hit had com frome her

And whan sir Launcelot saw that tokyn wyte you well

he was neuer so fayne // where is my lady seyde sir

Launcelot In the castell of Case seyde the messynger

but ·v myle hens Than thought sir Launcelot to be Þer

the same nyght And than this dame Brusen by the

commaundemente of kynge Pelles he let sende Elay//

ne to this castell wyth ·xxv· knyghtes vnto Þe castell

of Case Than sir Launcelot a yenst nyght rode vnto

the castell and there anone he was receyved wor//

shypfully wyth suche people to his semynge as we//

re a boute quene Gwenyuer secrete So whan sir Launce//

lot was a lyght he asked where the quene was // So dame

Brusen seyde she was in her bed And than people were a

voyded and sir Launcelot was lad in to her chambir And Þan

dame Brusen brought sir Launcelot a kuppe of wyne and

a none as he had drunken that wyne he was so a soted and

madde that he myght make no delay but wyth oute ony let

he wente to bedde and so he wente that mayden Elayne

had bene quene Gwenyuer And wyte you well that sir Launce//

lot was glad and so was that lady Eleyne that she had gotyn

sir Launcelot in her armys for well she knew that Þat same

nyght sholde be by gotyn sir Galahad vppon her that sholde

preve the beste knyght of the worlde and so they lay to gydir

vntyll the beste knyght of the worlde and so they lay to gydir

vntyll vnderne of the morne and all the wyndowys and

holys of that chambir were stopped that no maner of day myȝt

be seyne // And anone sir Launcelot remembryd hym and a


f. 324v (XI.2-3)

 

rose vp and wente to the wyndow // And anone as he had

vnshutte the wyndow the enchauntemente was paste//

Than he knew hym selff that he had done a mysse Alas

he seyde that I haue loved so longe for now am I shamed And

anone he gate his swerde in his honde and seyde Þou traytures

what arte Þou that I haue layne bye all this nyght Þou

shalt dye ryght here of myne hondys Than this fayre

lady Elayne skypped oute of her bedde all naked and seyde

fayre curteyse knyght sir Launcelot knelynge by fore hym

ye ar comyn of kynges bloode and there fore I requyre you

haue mercy vppon me and as Þou arte renowmed Þe moste

noble knyght of the worlde sle me nat for I haue in my

wombe by getyn of the that shall be the moste nobelyste

knyght of the worlde  // A false traytoures why haste Þou

be trayed me telle me a none seyde sir Launcelot what Þou

arte // Sir she seyde I am Elayne the doughter of kynge

Pelles well seyde sir Launcelot I woll for gyff you and there

wyth he toke her vp in his armys and kyssed her for she

was a fayre lady and Þer to lusty and yonge and wyse as

ony was that tyme lyvynge So god me helpe seyde Sir

Launcelot I may nat wyte you but her that made thys

enchauntemente vppon me and be twene you and me and

I may fynde her that same lady dame Brusen shall lose

her hede for her wycche crauftys for there was neuer knyght

disceyved as I am this nyght And so sir Launcelot arayed

hym and toke his leve myldely at that yonge lady Elayne

and so he departed // Than she seyde my lorde sir Launcelot I

be seche you se me as sone as ye may for I haue a obeyde

me vnto the prophesye that my fadir tolde me and by hys com//

maundemente to full fyll this prophecie I haue gyvyn the Þe

grettyst ryches and the fayryst floure that euer I had & Þat ^is my

 

 

                        Maydynhode


f. 325 (XI.3-4)

 

maydynhode that I shall neuer haue a gayne And there fore

Jantyll knyght owȝe me youre good wyll And so sir Launcelot

arayed hym and armed hym and toke hys leve myldely at

that yonge lady Eleyne and so he departed and rode to the

castell of Corbyn where her fadir was as faste as

her tyme cam she was delyuerde of a fayre chylde & they

crystynd hym Galahad and wyte yow well that chylde

was well kepte and well norysshed and he was so named

Galahad by cause sir Launcelot was so named at the fountay//

ne stone And aftir that the lady of the lake confermed hym

sir Launcelot du lake Than aftir the lady was delyuerde and

churched there cam a knyght vnto her hys name was Sir

Bromell la pleche the whyche was a grete lorde and he

had loved that lady Eleyne longe and he euer more desyred

to wedde her and so by no meane she coude put hym off //

Tylle on a day she seyde to sir Bromell wyte you well Sir

knyght I woll nat love you for my love ys sette vppon the beste

knyght of the worlde // who ys that seyde sir Bromell sir she

seyde hit ys sir Launcelot du lake that I love and none oÞer and

thre fore wowe ye me ne lenger ye sey well seyde sir Bro//

mell And sytthyn ye haue tolde me so muche ye shall have

lytyll Joy of sir Launcelot for I shall sle hym where som euer

I mete hym // Sir seyde this lady Elayne do to hym no tre//

son and god for bede that ye spare hym // well my lady seyde

sir Bromell and I shall promyse you this ·xij· monthe day I

shall kepe le pounte Corbyn for sir Launcelot sake that he

shall nothir com noÞer go vnto you but I shall mete wyth hym

Than as hit fell by fortune an aduenture sir Bors de Ga//

nys that was nevew vnto sir Launcelot com ouer that brydge

and there sir Bromell and Bors Justed And sir Bors smo//

te sir Bromell suche a buffette that he bare hym ouer his horse


f. 325v (XI.4)

 

croupe And than sir Bromell as an hardy man pulled oute his

swerde and dressed hys shylde to do batayle wyth sir Bors &

anone sir Bors a lyght and voyded his horse and there they

daysshed to gydyrs many sad strokys and longe thus th they

faught And at the laste sir Bromell was leyde to the erthe

And there sir Bors be gan to vnlace his helme to sle hym

Than sir Bromell cryed hym mercy and yeldyd hym vppon

this covenaunte Þou shalt haue thy lyff seyde sir Bors so Þou

go vnto my lorde sir Launcelot vppon whytsonday nexte com//

mynge and yelde the vnto hym as a knyght recreaunte //

Sir I woll do hit seyde sir Bromell and so he sware vppon

the crosse of the swerde and so he lete hym departe And Sir

Bors rode vnto kynge Pelles that was wyth in Cor//

byne And whan the kynge and Elayne hys doughter knew

that sir Bors was nevew vnto sir Launcelot they made hym

grete chere Than seyde dame Elayne we mervayle whe//

re sir Launcelot ys for he cam neuer here but onys that euer

I sawe // Madame mervayle ye nat seyde sir Bors for this

halff yere he hath bene in preson wyth quene Morgan//

le fay kynge Arthurs systir Alas seyde dame Eleyne that

me sore repentyth And euer sir Bors be hylde that chylde

in her armys and euer hym semed hit was passynge lyke

sir Launcelot truly seyde dame Elayne wyte you well

this chylde he be gate vppon me Than sir Bors wept for

Joy And there he prayde to god that hit myght preve as

good a knyght as hys fadir was And so there cam In a

wyght dowve and she bare a lytyll sensar of golde in

her mowÞe and there was al maner of metys & drynkis

and a mayden bare that Sank greall and she seyde Þer

opynly wyte you well sir Bors that this chylde sir Galahad

shall sytte in the Syege perelous and enchyve the Sank


f. 326 (XI.4)

 

Greall And he shall be muche bettir than euer was his fadir

sir Launcelot that ys hys owne fadir And than they kneled a

downe and made there devocions and there was suche a

savoure as all the spycery in the worlde had bene there

And as the dowve had takyn her flyght the mayden vanys//

shed wyth the Sank greall as she cam Sir seyde sir Bors

than vnto kynge Pelles this castell may be named the

castell aduentures for here be many stronge aduentu//

res That is sothe seyde the kynge For well may thys

place be called the aduentures place for there com but

feaw knyghtes here that goth a way wyth ony worshyppe

he be neuer so stronge here he may be preved And but late

a go sir Gawayne the good good knyght gate lytyll wor//

shyp here for I lat you wyte seyde kynge Pelles here

shall no knyght wynne worshyp but yf he be of worshyp but

hym selff and of good lyvynge and that lovyth god and dredyth

god and ellys he getyth no worshyp here be he neuer so hardy

a man // That is a wondir thynge seyde sir Bors what ye

meane in thys contrey for ye haue many straunge aduentu//

res and there fore woll I lye in thys castell thys nyȝt // Sir

ye shall nat do so seyde kynge Pelles be my counceyle for

hit ys harde and ye ascape wyth oute a shame // Sir I shall

take the aduenture that woll fall seyde sir Bors Than I

counceyle you seyde the kynge to be clene confessed // As for

that seyde sir Bors I woll be shryvyn wyth a good wyll // So

sir Bors was confessed And for all women sir Bors was a vir//

gyne sauff for one that was the doughter of kynge Braunde//

gorys and on her he gate a chylde whyche hyght Elayne &

sauff for her sir Bors was a clene mayden And so sir Bors was

lad vnto bed in a fayre large chambir and many durres were

shutte a boute the chambir // whan sir Bors had aspyde all tho


f. 326v (XI.4-5)

 

durrys he a voyded all the people for he myght haue no body

wyth hym But in no wyse sir Bors wolde vnarme hym

but so he leyde hym downe vppon the bed And ryght so he saw

a lyght com that he myght well se a speare grete and longe

that cam streyte vppon hym poyntelynge And sir Bors semed

that the hede of the speare brente lyke a tapir And anone or

sir Boors wyste Þe speare smote hym in the shuldir an hande

brede in depnes and that wounde grevid sir Bors passyng

sore and than he layde hym downe for payne And anone

there wyth all cam a knyght armed wyth hys shylde on

hys shuldir and hys swerde in hys honde and he bade Sir

Bors aryse sir knyght a fyght wyth me // I am sore hurte

but yet I shall nat fayle the And than sir Bors sterte vp

and dressed his shylde and than they laysshed to gydyrs mygh//

tyly a grete whyle and at the laste sir Bors bare hym bak//

warde tyll that he cam to a chambir dore and there Þat knyȝt

yode in to that chambir and rested hym a grete whyle And

whan he had reposed hym he cam oute fyersly a gayne and

be gan new batayle wyth sir Bors myghtyly and strongely

Than sir Bors thought he sholde no more go in to Þat chambir

to reste hym And so sir Bors dressed hym be twyxte Þe knyȝt

and the chambir dore And there sir Bors smote hym downe

and than that knyght yelded hym // what ys youre name

seyde sir Bors sir my name ys sri Bedyvere of the streyte

marchys So sir Bors made hym to swere that at whyt//

sonday nexte commynge to com to the courte of kynge Ar//

thure and yelde you there as presonere and as an ouer com

knyght by the hondys of sir Bors So thus departed sir Bedyve//

re of the strayte marche And than sir Bors layde hym downe

to reste And anone he harde muche noyse in that chambir // &

than sir Bors a spyed that there cam In he wyst nat whethir


f. 327 (XI.5)

 

at durrys or at wyndowys shotte of arowys & of quarellys

so thyk that he mervayled and many felle vppon hym & hurte

hym in the bare placys And than sir Bors was ware whe//

re cam In an hedyous lyon So sir Bors dressed hym to Þat

lyon and anone the lyon be raufte hym hys shylde And with

hys swerde sir Bors smote of the lyons hede // Ryght so

furth wyth all he sawe a dragon in the courte passynge

parelous and orryble and there semyd to hym that there

were lettyrs off golde wryttyn in hys forhede And sir Bors

thought that the lettyrs made a sygnyfycacion of kynge Ar//

thure and ryght so there cam an orryble lybarde and an

olde and there they faught longe and ded grete batayle to

gydyrs And at the laste the dragon spytte oute of hys mow//

the as hit had bene an C· dragons and lyghtly all the smale

dragons slew the olde dragon and tore hym all to pecys // &

anone furth wyth all there cam an olde man in to Þe halle

and he sette hym downe in a fayre chayre and there semed

to be ·ij· addirs a boute hys nek And than the olde man had

an harpe and there he sange an olde lay of Joseph of Ara//

mathy how he cam in to this londe And whan he had sungen

this olde man bade sir Bors go frome thens for here shall

ye haue no mo adventures yet full worshypfully haue ye

encheved this and bettir shall ye do hyre aftir And than sir

Bors semed that there cam the whyghtyst dowve that euer

he saw wyth a lytyll goldyn sensar in her mowthe & anone

there wyth all the tempeste ceased and passed a way that a

fore was mervaylous to hyre So was all that courte full

of good savoures Than sir Bors saw ·iiij· fayre chyldren be//

rynge ·iiij·fayre tapirs and an olde man in the myddys of

this chyldyrn wyth a sensar in hys one honde and a speare

in hys othir honde and that speare was called the speare of


f. 327v (XI.5-6)

 

vengeaunce // Now seyde that olde man to sir Bors go ye to

youre cousyn sir Launcelot and telle hym this aduenture had

be moste convenyent for hym of all earthely knyghtes But

synne ys so foule in hym that he may nat enchyve none

suche holy dedys for had nat bene hys synne he had paste

all the knyghtes that euer were in hys dayes And telle Þou

sir Launcelot of all worldly aduenture he passyth in man//

hode and preves all othir But in this spyrytuall maters

he shall haue many hys bettyrs And than sir Bors sawe

iiij· Jantyll women com by hym pourely be seyne and he

saw where that they entirde in to a chambir where was

grete lyght as hit were a somers lyght and the women

kneled downe be fore an auter of syluer wyth iiij· pyloures

as hit had bene a bysshop whyche kneled a fore the table of

And as sir Bors loked ouer hys hede he saw a swerde lyke syluer na//

ked hovynge ouer hys hede and clyernes Þer of smote in hys yȝen

that as at that tyme sir Bors was blynde and there he harde

a voyce whyche seyde go hens Þou sir Bors for as yet Þou arte

nat worthy for be in thys place and than he yode bakwarde

tylle hys bedde tylle on the morne // And so on the morne kyng

Pelles made grete Joy of sir Bors and than he departed and

rode vnto Camelot And there he founde sir Launcelot & tolde

hym of the aduentures that he had sene wyth kynge Pelles

at Corbyn And so the noyse sprange in kynge Arthurs that

sir Launcelot had gotyn a chylde vppon Elayne the doughter of

kynge Pelles where fore quene Gwenyuer was wrothe &

she was gaff many rebukes to sir Launcelot and called hym false

knyght And than sir Launcelot tolde the quene all and how he

was made to lye by her in the lyknes of you my lady the que//

ne And so the quene hylde sir Launcelot exkused And as the

booke seythe kynge Arthure had bene in fraunce and hadde


f. 328 (XI.6-7)

 

warred vppon the myghty kynge Claudas and had wonne

muche of hys londys And whan the kynge was com a gayne

he lete cry a grete feste that all lordys and ladyes of all

Ingelonde shulde be there but yf hit were suche as were

rebellyous a gaynste hym // And whan dame Elayne the

doughter of kynge Pelles harde of thys feste she yode to her

fadir and requyred hym that he wolde gyff her leve to ryde

to that feste // The kynge answerde and seyde I woll that ye

go thydir but in ony wyse as ye love me and woll haue my

blyssynge loke that ye be well be seyne in the moste rychest

wyse and loke that ye spare nat for no coste aske & ye shall

haue all that nedyth vnto you // Than by the advyce of dame

Brusen her mayden all thynge was appareyled vnto Þe pur//

pose that there was neuer no lady rychelyar be seyne // So

she rode wyth ·xxti· knyghtes and ·x· ladyes and Jantyll women

to the numbir of an ·C· horse And whan she cam to Camelott

kynge Arthure and quene Gwenyuer seyde wyth all Þe knyȝtes

that dame Elayne was the beste be seyne lady that euer was

seyne in that courte // And anone as kynge Arthure wyste

that she was com he mette her and salewed her And so ded

the moste party of all the knyghtes of the rounde table both

sir Trystram sir Bleoberys and sir Gawayne and many

mo that I woll nat reherse But whan sir Launcelot sye

her he was so a shamed by cause he drew hys swerde

to her on the morne aftir that he had layne by her that he

wolde nat salewe her noÞer speke wyth her And yet sir Laun//

celot thought that she was the fayrest woman that euer he

sye in his lyeff dayes But whan dame Elayne saw Sir

Launcelot wolde nat speke vnto her she was so hevy she

he wente her harte wolde haue to braste For wyte you

well oute of mesure she loved hym And than dame Elayne


f. 328v (XI.7-8)

 

seyde vnto her woman dame Brusen the vnkyndenes of sir

Launcelot sleyth myne harte nere // A peas madame seyde

dame Brusen I shall vndir take that this nyght he shall

lye wyth you and ye woll holde you stylle That were me

lever seyde dame Elayne than all the golde that ys a bovyn

erthe lat me deale seyde dame Brewsen So whan dame

Eleyne was brought vnto the quene aythir made oÞer goode

chere as by countenaunce but no thynge wyth there hartes

But all men and women spake of the beaute of dame Elay//

ne And than hit was ordayned that dame Elayne shulde

slepe in a chambir nyȝ by the quene and all vndir one rooff

And so hit was done as the kynge commaunded // Than the

quene sente for sir Launcelot and bade hym com to her cham//

bir that nyght oÞer ellys seyde the quene I am sure that ye

woll go to youre ladyes bedde dame Elayne by whome

ye gate Galahad A madame seyde sir Launcelot neuer say

ye so for that I ded was a yenste my wylle Than seyde the

quene loke that ye com to me whan I sende for you // Ma//

dame seyde sir Launcelot I shall nat fayle you but I shall be

redy at youre commaundement // So this bargayne was nat

so sone done and made be twene them but dame Brusen

knew hit by her crauftes and tolde hit vnto her lady dame

Elayne // Alas seyde she how shall I do // lat me deale seyde

dame Elayne Brusen for I shall brynge bym by Þe honde

evyn to youre bedde and he shall wyne that I am quene

Gwenyuers messyngere // Than well were me seyde dame

Elayne for all the worlde I love nat so muche as I do sir Laun//

celot // So whan tyme com that all folkys were to bedde

dame Brusen cam to sir Launcelottes beddys syde And seyde

sir Launcelot du lake slepe ye · My lady quene Gwenyuer lyeth//

and a waytyth vppon you // A my fayre lady seyde sir Launcelot


f. 329 (XI.8)

 

I am redy to go wyth you whoÞer ye woll haue me // So Launce//

lot threwe vppon hym a longe gowne and so he toke his swer//

de in hys honde And than dame Brusen toke hym by the fyngir

and lad hym to her ladyes bedde dame Elayne And than she de//

parted and leaffte them there in bedde to gydyrs And wyte you

well this lady was glad And so was sir Launcelot for he wen//

de that he had had a noÞer in hys armys // Now leve we them

kyssynge and clyppynge as was a kyndely thynge And nw

speke we of quene Gwenyuer that sente one of her women

that she moste trusted vnto sir Launcelotys bedde And whan

she cam there she founde the bedde colde and he was nat

there In And so she cam to the quene and tolde her all // Alas

seyde the quene where is that false knyght be com // So Þe

quene was nyȝe oute of her wytte And than she wrythed

and waltred as a madde woman and myght nat slepe a

iiij· or a ·v· owres // Than sir Launcelot had a condicion that

he vsed of custom to clatir in his slepe and to speke oftyn of

hys lady quene Gwenyuer So sir Launcelot had a wayked as

longe as hit had pleased hym and so by course of kynde he

slepte and dame Elayne bothe And in his slepe he talked &

claterde as a Jay of the love that had bene be twyxte quene

Gwenyuer and hym And so as he talked so lowde that Þe quene

harde hym there as he lay in her chambir And whan she

harde hym so clattir she was wrothe oute of mesure // And

than she cowghed so lowde that sir Launcelot a waked and a

none he knew her hemynge And than he knew welle that

he lay by the quene Elayne And there wyth he lepte oute

of hys bedde as he had bene a wood man in hys shurte // And

anone the quene mette hym in the floure And thus she seyde

A Þou false traytoure knyght loke Þou neuer a byde in my cour//

te and lyghtly that Þou voyde my chambir And nat so hardy Þou


f. 329v (XI.8-9)

 

false traytoure knyght that euer more Þou com in my syght

Alas seyde sir Launcelot And there wyth he toke suche an har//

tely sorow at her wordys that he felle downe to the floure

in a sowne And there wyth all quene Gwenyuer departed and

whan sir Launcelot a wooke oute of hys swoȝe he lepte oute

at a bay wyndow in to a gardyne And there wyth thornys he

was all to cracched of his vysage and hys body and so he ranne

furth he knew nat whothir and was as wylde as euer was

man and so he ran ·ij· yere and neuer man had grace to know

hym // Now turne we vnto quene Gwenyuer and to the

fayre lady Elayne that whan dame Elayne harde Þe quene

so rebuke sir Launcelot And how also he sowned and how he lepte

oute of the bay wyndow Than she seyde vnto quene Gwenyuer

Madame ye ar gretly to blame for sir Launcelot for now haue

ye loste hym for I saw and harde by his countenaunce that he

ys madde for euer And there fore alas madame ye haue

done grete synne and youre selff grete dyshonoure for ye

haue a lorde royall of youre owne And there fore hit were

youre parte for to love hym for there ys no quene in this wol//

worlde that hath suche a noÞer kynge as ye haue And yf ye

were nat I myght haue getyn the love of my lorde sir Laun//

celot and a grete cause I haue to love hym for he hadde my

maydynhode and by hym I haue borne a fayre sonne whose

ys sir Galahad and he shall be in hys tyme the beste knyght

of the worlde // well dame Elayne seyde the quene as sone

as hit ys day lyght I charge you to a voyde my courte And for

the love ye owȝe vnto sir Launcelot discouer not hys counceyle

for and ye do hit woll be hys deth As for that seyde dame Elay//

ne I dare vndir take he ys marred for euer And that haue you

made for noÞer ye nor I ar lyke to reioyse hym for he made Þe

moste pytevous gronys whan he lepte oute at yondir bay


f. 330 (XI.9)

 

wyndow that euer I harde man make Alas seyde feyre Elayne

and alas seyde the quene for now I wote well that we haue

loste hym for euer // So on the morne dame Elayne toke her

leve to departe and wolde no lenger a byde Than kynge Arthur

brought her on her way wyth me than an ·C· knyghtes thorow

oute a foreyste And by the way she tolde sir Bors de ganys all

how be hit be tydde that same nyght And how sir Launcelot lepte

oute at a wyndow araged oute of hys wytte // Alas than seyde

sir Bors where ys my lorde sir Launcelot be com // Sir seyde

dame Eleyne I wote nere // Now alas seyde sir Bors be twyxt

you bothe ye haue destroyed a good knyght // As for me sir seyde

dam Elayne I seyde nevir noÞer dede thynge that shulde in

ony wyse dysplease hym But wyth the rebuke sir that quene

Gwenyuer gaff hym I saw hym sowne to the erthe And whan he

a woke he toke hys honde naked save hys shurte and lepe oute

at a wyndow wyth the greselyest grone that euer I harde man

make // Now fare well seyde dame Elayne vnto sir Bors and

holde my lorde kynge Arthure wyth a tale as longe as ye can

for I woll turne a gayne vnto quene Gwenyuer and gyff her

an hete and I requyre you as euer ye woll haue my seruyse make

good wacched and aspye yf euer may happyn you to se my lorde

sir Launcelot Truly seyde dame Elayne I shall do all that I may

do for I wolde lose my lyff for hym rathir than he shulde be

hurte // Madame seyde dame Brusen lat sir Bors departe and

hyȝe hym as faste as he may to seke sir Launcelot for I warne

you he ys clene oute of hys mynde and yet he shall be welle

holpyn and but by myracle // Than wepte dame Elayne and

so ded sir Bors de ganys and anone they departed And sir Bors rode

streyte vnto quene Gwenyuer And whan she saw sir Bors she

wepte as she were wood // Now fye on youre wepynge seyde sir

Bors de ganys for ye wepe neuer but whan Þer ys no boote //


f. 330v (XI.9-10)

 

Alas seyde sir Bors that euer sir Launcelot or ony of hys blood euer saw

you for now haue ye loste the beste knyght of oure blood and

he that was all oure leder and oure succoure And I dare say

and make hit good that all kynges crystynde noÞer hethynde may

nat fynde suche a knyght for to speke of his noblenes & curte//

sy wyth hys beaute and hys Jantylnes // Alas seyde sir Bors

what shall we do that ben of hys bloode Alas seyde sir Ector//

de marys And alas seyde sir Lyonell and whan the quene

harde hem sey so she felle to the erthe in a dede sowne //

And than sir Bors toke her vp and dawed her And whan

she a waked she kneled a fore tho ·iij· knyghtes and hylde

vp bothe there hondys and be sought them to seke hym

and spare nat for no goodys but that he be founden for

I wote well that he ys oute of hys mynde // And sir Bors

sir Ector and sir Lyonell departed frome the quene for they myȝt

nat a byde no lenger for sorow And than the quene sente

them tresoure I nowe for there expence and so they toke

there horsys and there armour and departede and than they

rode frome contrey to contrey in forestes and in wyldirnes//

sys and in wastys and euer they leyde waycche bothe at forestes

and at all maner of men as they rode to harkyn and to spare

affir hym as he that was a naked man in his shurte wyth

a swerde in hys honde And thus they rode nyȝe a quarter of

a yere longe and ouertwarte and neuer cowde hyre worde of

hym And wyte you well these ·iij· knyghtes were passynge

sory And so at the laste sir Bors and hys felowys mette wyth

a knyght that hyght sir Merlyon de Tartare Now fayre knyȝt

seyde sir Bors whothir be ye a way for they knew aythir oÞer

a fore tyme Sir seyde sir Mellyon I am in the way to Þe courte

of kynge Arthure Than we pray you seyde sir Bors that

ye woll telle my lorde Arthure and my lady quene Gwenyuer


f. 331 (XI.10)

 

and all the felyshyp of the rounde table that we can nat in

no wyse here telle where sir Launcelot ys be com Than sir

Mellyon departed from them and seyde the he wolde telle the

kynge and the quene and all the felyshyp of the rounde table

as they had desyred hym // And whan sir Mellyon cam to the

courte he tolde the kynge and the quene and all the felyship

as they had desyred hym how sir Bors had seyde of sir Launcelot

Than sir Gawayne sir Vwayne sir Sagramoure le desyrous sir

Agglovale and sir Percyvale de galys toke vppon them by the

grete desyre of the kynge and in especiall by the quene to

seke all Inglonde walys and Sotlonde to fynde sir Launce//

lot And wyth them rode ·xviij· knyghtes mo to beare them

felyshyppe And wyte you well they lakked no maner of spen//

dynge and so were they ·xxiijti· knyghtes // Now turne we

vnto sir Launcelot and speke we of hys care and woo and

what payne he there endured for tolde hungir and thyrste

he hadde plente And thus as these noble knyghtes rode to

gydyrs they by assente departed and than they rode by ·ij· and

by ·iij· and by ·iiij· by ·v· And euer they assygned where they shol//

de mete And so sir Agglovale and sir Percyvale rode to gydir

vnto there modir whyche was a quene in tho dayes And

whan she saw her ·ij· sunnes for Joy she wepte tendirly And

than she seyde a my dere sonnes whan youre fadir was slay//

ne he leffte me ·iiij· sonnes of the whyche now be ·ij· slayne

And for the dethe of my noble sonne sir Lamorak shall myne

harte neuer be glad And than she kneled downe vppon her kne//

es to fore sir Agglovale and sir Percyvale and be sought them

to a byde at home wyth her // A my swete modir seyde Sir

Percyvale we may nat for we be comyn of kynges bloode

of bothe partis And there fore modir hit ys oure kynde to

haunte armys and noble dedys // Alas my swete sonnys Þem


f. 331v (XI.10-11)

 

she seyde for youre sakys I shall fyrste lose my lykynge & luste

And than wynde and wedir I may nat endure what for the

of kynge Pellynor youre fadir that was shamefully slayne

by the hondys of sir Gawayne And hys brothir sir Gawayne Ga//

herys and they slew hym nat manly but by treson And alas

my dere sonnes thys ys a pytevous complaynte for me off

youre fadyrs dethe conciderynge also the dethe of sir Lamorak

that of knyghthod had but feaw fealowys And now my dere

sonnes haue this in youre mynde And so there was but we//

pynge and sobbyge in the courte whan they sholde departe

and she felle in sownynge in the myddys of the courte // And

whan she was a waked aftir them she sente a squyar wyth

spendynge I nowȝe And so whan the squyar had ouer take them

they wolde nat suffir hym to ryde wyth them but sente hym

home a gayne to comforte there modir prayynge her meke//

ly of her blyssynge And so he rode a gayne and so hit happened

hym to be be nyghtyd and by mys fortune he cam to a castel·

where dwelled a barowne And whan the squyar was com

in to the castell the lorde asked hym from whens he cam

and whom he served // My lorde seyde the squyar I serve a

good knyght that ys called sir Agglovale the squyar sayde hit

to good entente wenynge vnto hym to haue be more for

borne for sir Agglovales sake // And than he seyde he had serued

the quene hys modir // well my felow seyde the lorde of the

castell forsirAgglovalys sake Þou shalt haue evyll lodgyng

for sir Agglovale slew my broÞer and there fore Þou shalt haue

thy dethe in party of paymente And than that lorde commaunded

hys men to haue hym a way and to sle hym And so they ded &

than they pulled hym oute of the castell and there they slewe

hym wyth oute mercy // And ryght so on the morne com sir

Agglovale and sir Percyvale rydynge by a churche yearde //


f. 332 (XI.11)

 

where men and women were busy and be hylde the dede squyar

and so thought to bury hym what ys that there seyde sir Agglo//

vale that ye be holde so faste // Anone a good woman sterte furth

and seyde fayre knyght here lyeth a squyar slayne shamefully

this nyght // how was he slayne fayre modir sayde sir Agglova//

le my fayre lorde seyde the woman the lorde of thys castell

lodged this squyar thys nyght and be cause he seyde he was

seruaunte vnto a good knyght whyche ^is wyth kynge Arthure whos

name ys sir Agglovale there fore the lorde commaunded to sle

hym and for thys cause ye he slayne // Gramercy seyde sir Agglo//

vale and ye shall se hys dethe lyghtly revenged for I am that same

knyght for whom thys squyar was slayne // Than sir Agglovale

called vnto hym sir Percyvale and bade hym a lyght lyghtly And

anone they be toke there men Þer horsys and so they yode on foote

in to the castell And as sone as they were wyth in the castell

gate sir Agglovale bade the porter go vnto hys lorde and tell his

lorde that I am here sir Agglovale for whom my squyar was slay//

ne thys nyght And anone as this porter had tolde hys lorde

he ys welcom seyde sir Goodwyne and anone he armed hym &

cam in to the courte and seyde whyche of you ys sir Agglovale //

here I am loo but for what cause slewyst Þou thys nyght my

modyrs squyar // I slew hym seyde sir Goodwyne by cause of the

for Þou slewyste my broÞer sir Gawdelyne As for thy broÞer seyde sir

Agglovale I a vow I slew hym for he was a false knyght and a

be trayer of ladyes and of good knyghtes and for the dethe of my

squyar seyde sir Agglovale And anone they laysshd to gydyrs as

egirly as hit had bene ·ij· lyons And sir Percyvale he faught

wyth all the remenaunte that wolde fyght And wyth in

a whyle sir Percyvale had slayne all that wolde with stonde


f. 332v (XI.11-12)

 

hym For sir Percyvale deled so hys strokys that were so rude

that there durste no man a byde hym And wyth in a whyle

sir Agglovale had sir Goodwyne at the erthe and there he vnla//

ced hys helme and strake of hys hede And then they departed

and toke Þer horsys And than they let cary the ded squyar vn//

to a pryory and there they entered hym And whan thys was

done they rode in many contreys euer in quyrynge aftir sir Laun//

celot But they coude neuer hyre of hym And at the laste they

com to a castell that hyght Cardycan And Þer sir Percyvale and

sir Agglouale were lodged to gydyrs and prevaly a boute

mydnyght sir Percyvale com to sir Agglovales squyar and seyde

aryse and make the redy for ye and I woll ryde a way se//

cretely // Sir seyde the squyar I wolde full fayne ryde with

you where ye wolde haue me but and my lorde youre

broÞer take me he woll sle me As for that care not for I

shall be youre warraunte And so sir Percyvale rode tyll hyt

was aftir none And than he cam vppon a brydge of stone

and Þer he founde a knyght whyche was bounden wyth a

chayne faste a boute the waste vnto a pylloure of stone

A my fayre knyght seyde that boundyn knyght I requyre

the of knyghthode lowse my bondys of // Sir what knyȝt

ar ye seyde sir Percyvale and for what cause ar ye bounden //

Sir I shall telle you seyde that knyght I am a knyght off

the table rounde and my name ys sir Percyvale Persydes

and thus by aduenture I cam thys way and here I lodged

in thys castell at the brydge foote And Þer in dwellyth

an vncurteyse lady and by cause she proffyrd me to be

her paramoure and I refused her she sette her men vppon

me suddeynly or euer I myght com to my wepyn Þus they

 

 

 

                                    Toke me and


f. 333 (XI.12)

 

toke me and bounde me and here I wote w well I shall

dye but yf som man of worshyp breke my bondys // Sir

be ye of good chere seyde sir Percyvale and by cause ye ar

a knyght of the rounde table as well as I · I woll truste

to god to breke youre bondys And Þer wyth sir Percyvale

pulled oute hys swerde and strake at the chayne wyth

suche a myght that he cutte a to the chayne And thorow

sir Parsydes hawbirke and hurte hym a lytyll // A Jhu seyde

sir Parsydes that was a myghty stroke as euer I felte of mannes

hande for had nat the chayne be ye had slayne me And Þer with

all sir Parsydes saw a knyght whyche cam oute of Þe castell

as faste as euer he myght flynge // Sir be ware for yondyr

commyth a knyght that woll haue a do with you lat hym com sey//

de sir Percyvale and so mette that knyght in myddys the brydge

And sir Percyvale gaff hym suche a buffette that he smote hym

quyte frome hys horse and ouer a parte of the brydge that and

there had nat bene a lytyll vessell vndir the brydge that knyȝt

had bene drowned And than sir Percyvale toke the knyghtes horse

and made sir Percyvale Persydes to mounte vppon hym And so

they ·ij· rode vnto the castell and bade the lady delyuer sir Persydes

seruauntys othir ellys he wolde sle all that euer he founde and so

for feare she delyuerde them all // Than was sir Percyvale were

ware of a lady that stoode in that towre // A madame seyde sir

Percyvale what vse and custom ys that in a lady to destroy good

knyghtes but yf they woll be youre paramoure parde this a shame//

full custom of a lady and yf I had nat a grete mater to do in

my honde I shulde for do all youre false customys And so sir

Parsydes brought sir Percyvale vnto hys owne castell & there

he made hym grete chere all that nyght And on the morne

whan sir Percyvale had harde a masse and broke hys faste


f. 333v (XI.12-13)

 

he bade sir Parsydes ryde vnto kynge Arthure And telle

ye Þe kynge how that ye mette wyth me And telle you

my broÞer sir Agglovale how I rescowed you and byd hym seke

nat aftir me for I am In the queste to syke sir Launcelot du//

lake And thouȝe he seke me he shall nat fynde me And tell

hym I woll neuer se hym nothir the courte tylle that I haue

founde sir Launcelot Also telle sir Kay the senescyall and Syr

Mordred that I truste to Jhu to be of as grete worthynes

as aythir of them for tell them that I shall neuer for gete

Þer nok mokkys and scornys that day that I was made knyȝt

And telle them I woll neuer se that courte tylle men speke

more worshyp of me than euer they ded of ony of them bothe

And so sir Parsydes departed frome sir Percyvale and than he

rode vnto kynge Arthure and tolde of sir Percyvale And whan

sir Agglovale harde hym speke of hys brothir sir Percyvale for

sothe he seyde he departed fro me vnkyndly // Sir seyde sir Per//

sydes on my lyff he shall preve a noble knyght as ony now

ys lyvynge And whan he saw sir Kay and sir Mordred sir Par//

sydes sayde thus my fayre lordys sir Percyvale gretyth

you well bothe and he sente you worde by me Þat he trustyth

to god or euer he com to courte a gayne to be of as grete nobles

as euer were you bothe and mo men to speke of his noble//

nesse than euer spake of youres // hyt may well be seyde sir

Kay and sir Mordred but at that tyme he was made knyght

he was full vn lykly to preve a good knyght // As for that

seyde kynge Arthure he muste nedys preve a good knyght

for hys fadir and hys breÞerne were noble knyghtes all//

And now woll we turne vnto sir Percyvale that rode

longe and in a foreyste he mette wyth a knyght wyth a

brokyn shylde and a brokyn helme And as sone as aythir


f. 334 (XI.13)

 

saw oÞer they made them redy to Juste and so they hurled to

gydyrs wyth all Þer myghtes and they mette to gydyrs so hard

that sir Percyvele was smyttyn to the erthe And than sir Percy//

vale arose delyuerly and keste hys shylde on hys shuldir and

drew hys swerde and bade the oÞer knyght a lyght and do batay//

le vnto the vttirmuste // well sir wyll ye more yet seyde that

knyght and Þer wyth he a lyght and put hys horse from hym

And than they cam to gydir an easy easy pace and laysshed to

gydyrs with noble swerdys and som tyme they stroke & som

tyme they foyned that ayÞer gaff oÞer many sad strokys & woun//

dys And thus they faught nere hande halffe a day & neuer

rested but lytyll and Þer was none of them bothe that hadde

lefte woundys but he had ·xv· And they bledde so muche Þat

hyt was mervayle they stoode on Þer feete But thys knyght

that faught wyth sir Percyvale was a proved knyght and a

wyse fyghtynge knyght · And sir Percyvale was yonge and

stronge nat knowynge in fyghtynge as the othir was //

Than sir Percyvale spake fyrste and seyde sir knyght holde

thy honde a whyle for we haue foughtyn ouer longe for a sym//

ple mater and quarell and Þer fore I requyre the tell me

thy name for I was neuer ar thys tyme thus macched // So

god me helpe seyde that knyght and neuer or this tyme was

Þer neuer knyght that wounded me so sore as Þou haste done

and yet haue I foughtyn in many batayles and now shall

Þou wyte Þat I am a knyght of the table rounde and my name

ys sir Ector de marys broÞer vnto the good knyght sir Launcelot

du lake Alas sayde sir Percyvale and my name ys sir Percyvale

de Galys whyche hath made my quste to seke sir Launcelott

and now am I syker that I shall neuer fenyshe my queste for ye

haue slayne me with youre hondys // hit is nat so seyde Sir

Ector for I am slayne by youre hondys and may nat lyve and


f. 334v (XI.13-14)

 

Þer fore I requyre you seyde sir Ector vnto sir Percyvale ryde ye

here faste by to a pryory and brynge me a preste that I may

resseyve my savyoure for I may nat lyve And whan ye com

to Þe courte of kynge Arthure tell ^nat my broÞer sir Launcelot how

that ye slew me for than woll he be youre mortall enemy

But ye may sey that I was slayne in my queste as I souȝt

hym // Alas seyde sir Percyvale ye sey that to thynge that

neuer woll be for I am so faynte for bledynge that I may

vnnethe stonde how sholde I than take my horse Than they

made bothe grete dole oute of mesure This woll nat a

vayle seyde sir Percyvale and than he kneled downe and made

hys prayer devoutely vnto all myghty Jhu for he was one

of the beste knyghtes of the worlde at that tyme in whom

the verrey fayth stoode moste in // Ryght so there cam by Þe

holy vessell the sanke Greall wyth all maner of swetnesse

and savoure but they cowde nat so redyly who bare Þe ves//

sell // But sir Percyvale had a glemerynge fo the vessell

and of the mayden that bare hit for he was a perfyte may//

den And furth with all they were as hole of hyde and lymme

as euer they were in Þer lyff Than they gaff thankynges to god

with grete myldenesse // A Jhu seyde sir Percyvale what may

thys meane that we be thus heled and ryght now we we//

re at the poyynte of dyynge // I woote full well seyde sir

Ector what hit is hit is an holy vessell that is borne

by a mayden And Þer in ys a parte of the bloode of oure lorde

Jhu cryste but hit may nat be sene seyde sir Ector but yff

hit be by man // So god me helpe seyde sir Percyvale I

saw a damesell as me thought all in whyght with a vessell

in bothe her hondys and furth with all I was hole // So than

they toke Þer horsys and Þer harneys and mended hyt as well

as they myght that was brokyn And so they mounted vp


f. 335 (XI.14-XII.1)

 

and rode talkynge to gydyrs And Þer sir Ector de marys tolde

sir Percyvale how he had sought hys broÞer sir Launcelot longe

and neuer cowde hyre wytynge of hym in many harde adven//

tures haue I bene in thys queste and so aythir tolde othir

of there grete adventures

A

Nd now leve we of a whyle of sir Ector and of sir

Percyvale and speke we of sir Launcelot that suffird

and endured many sharpe showres that euer ran wylde woode

frome place to place and lyved by fruyte and suche as he myȝt

gete and dranke watir ·ij· yere And oÞer clothynge had he but ly//

tyll but in his shurte and his breke And thus as sir Launcelott

wandred here and Þer he cam in to a fayre medow where he

founde a pavelon And Þer by vppon a tre hynge a whyȝt shylde

and ij· swerdys hynge Þer by and ·ij· spearys lened Þer by to a tre

And whan sir Launcelot saw Þer swerdys a none he lepte to Þe tone

swerde and clyched that swerde in hys honde and drew hitte

oute and than he laysshed at the shylde that all Þe medow ran//

ge of Þe dyntys that he gaff such a noyse as ·x· knyghtes hadde

fought to gydyrs Than cam furth a dwarff and lepe vnto

sir Launcelot and wolde haue had the swerde oute of his honde

And than sir Launcelot toke hym by the bothe shuldrys & threw

hym vnto the grounde that he felle vppon hys nek And had

nyȝ brokyn hit And Þer wyth all the dwarff cryede helpe //

Than Þer com furth a lykly knyght and well apparaylede in

a scarlet furred with menyvere And anone as he saw sir Launce//

lot he demed that he shulde be oute of hys wytte And than

he seyde wyth fayre speche good man ley downe Þat swerde

for as me semyth Þou haddyst more nede of a slepe and of

warme clothis than to welde that swerde // As for that

seyde sir Launcelot com nat to nyȝe for and Þou do wyte Þou


f. 335v (XII.1)

 

well I woll sle the And whan the knyght of the pavylon saw

Þat he starte bakarde in to hys pavylon And than Þe dwarffe

armed hym lyghtly and so the knyght thought by force and

myght to haue takyn the swerde fro sir Launcelot And so he

cam sceppynge vppon hym And whan sir Launcelot saw hym

com so armed wyth hys swerde in hys honde // Than sir

Launcelot flowȝe to hym wyth suche a myght and smote

hym vppon the helme suche a buffet that the stroke trou//

bled his brayne and Þer wyth all the swerde brake in ·iij· And

the knyght felle to the erthe and semed as he had bene de//

de the bloode brastynge oute of his mowthe nose and eares

And than sir Launcelot ran in to the pavelon and russhed evyn

in to the warme bedde and there was a lady that lay in

that bedde and a none she gate her smokke and ran oute

of the pavylon And whan she sawe her lorde lye at the

grounde lyke to be dede than she cryed and wepte as she

had bene madde // And so wyth her noyse the knyght a wa//

ked oute of his sowȝe and loked vp weykly wyth his yen

And than he asked where was that madde man whyche

had yevyn hym suche a buffette for suche a one had I neuer

of mannes honde // Sir seyde the dwarff hit is nat youre

worshyp to hurte hym for he ys a man oute of hys wytte

and doute ye nat he hath bene a man of grete worshyp

and for som hartely sorow that he hath takyn he ys fallyn

madde and me semyth seyde the dwarff that he resembe//

lyth muche vnto sir Launcelot for hym I sawe at the turne//

mente of Loneȝep Jhu defende seyde that knyght that euer

that noble knyght sir Launcelot sholde be in suche a plyght

but what som euer he be seyde that knyght harme woll I

none do hym And this knyghtes name was sir Blyaunte Þe

whyche seyde vnto the dwarff go Þou faste on horse bak


f. 336 (XII.1-2)

 

vnto my broÞer sir Selyvaunte whyche ys in the castell Blan//

ke and telle hym of myne adventure and byd hym brynge

wyth hym an horse lytter and than woll we beare thys

knyght vnto my castell // So the dwarff rode faste and

he cam a gayn and brought sir Selyvaunte wyth hym and

vj. men wyth an horse lytter and so they toke vp the fethir

bedde wyth sir Launcelot and so caryed all a way wyth hem

vnto the castell blanke And he neuer a waked tylle he was

wyth in the castell and than they bounde hys handys and

hys feete and gaff hym · good metys and good drynkys

and brought hym a gayne to hys strengthe & his fayrenesse

But in hys wytte they cowde nat brynge hym noÞer to know

hym selff And thus was sir Launcelot there more than a yere

and an halff honestely arayed and fayre faryn wyth all

Than vppon a day thys lorde of that castell sir Blyaunte

toke hys armys on horse bak wyth a speare to seke Aduen//

tures And as he rode in a foreyste there mette hym to knyȝtes

adventures that one was sir Brewnys saunȝe pite & hys

broÞer sir Bartelot and thes ·ij· ran bothe at onys on sir Bleaunte

and brake theyre spearys vppon hys body And than they dre//

we there swerdys and made grete batayle and foughte

longe to gdyrs But at the laste sir Blyaunte was sore

wounded and felte hym selff faynte and a none he fledde

on horse bak towarde hys castell And as they cam hurlyng

vndir the castell And as they there was sir Launcelot at a

wyndow and saw how ·ij· knyghtes layde vppon sir Blyaunte

wyth there swerdys // And whan sir Launcelot saw that yet

as woode as he was he was sory for hys lorde sir Blyaunte

And than in a brayde sir Launcelot brake hys chaynes of hys

leggys and of hys armys And in the b^reakynge he hurte

hys hondys sore And so sir Launcelot ran oute at a posterne


f. 336v (XII.2-3)

 

and there he mette wyth tho ·ij· knyghtes that chaced Syr

Blyaunte and there he pulled downe sir Bartelot wyth his

bare hondys frome hys horse And there wyth all he

wrothe oute Þe swerde oute of hys honde And so he lepe

vnto sir Brewse and gaff hym suche a buffette vppon the

hede that he tumbeled bakwarde ouer hys horse croupe

And whan sir Bartelot saw hys broÞer haue suche a buffet

he gate a speare in hys honde and wolde haue renne

sir Launcelot thorow // And that saw sir Blyaunte & strake

of the honde of sir Bartelot And than sir Brewse and sir

Bartelot gate there horsis and fledde a way as faste

as they myght // So whan sir Selyuaunte cam and saw

what sir Launcelot had done for hys broÞer Than he thanked

god and so ded hys broÞer that euer they ded hym ony good

But whan sir Blyaunte sawe that sir Launcelot was hurte

wyth the brekynge of hys Irons than was he hovy that

euer he bounde hym // I pray you broÞer sir Selyvaunte byn//

de hym no more for he ys happy and gracyous // Than

they made grete Joy of sir Launcelot and so he bode there

affir an halff yere and more And so on a morne sir Laun//

celot was ware where cam a grete bore wyth many

houndys afftir hym But the boore was so bygge Þer

myght no houndys tary hym And so the hunters cam

aftir blowynge there hornys bothe vppon horse backe

and som vppon foote And than sir Launcelot was ware

where one a lyght and tyed hys horse tylle a tre and

lened hys speare a yenst the tre // So there cam Syr

Launcelot and founde the horse and a good swerde tyed

to the sadyll bowe And anone sir Launcelot lepe in to Þe

sadyll and gate that speare in hys honde and than he

rode faste aftir the boore And anone he was ware


f. 337 (XII.3)

 

where he sate and his ars to a roche faste by an E^rmytayge And

than sir Launcelot ran at the boore wyth hys speare and all to

shyvird his speare And there wyth the boore turned hym lyghtly

and rove oute the longys and the harte of the horse that sir Launce//

lot felle to the erthe And or euer he myght gete frome hys horse

the bore smote hym on the brawne of the thyghe vp vnto the

howȝe boone And than sir Launcelot was wrothe and vp he gate

vppon hys feete and toke hys swerde and smote of the borys

hede at one stroke // And there wyth all cam oute the Ermyte

and saw hym haue suche a wounde anone he meaned hym and

wolde haue had hym speake he was so wrothe wyth hys

wounde that he ran vppon the Ermyte to haue slayne hym

than the Ermyte ran a way And whan sir Launcelot myȝt nat

ouer gete hym he threw his swerde aftir hym for he myght no

farther for bledynge // Than the Ermyte turne a gayne

and asked sir Launcelot how he was hurte A my fealow seyde sir

Launcelot this boore hath byttyn me sore Than com ye wyth

me seyde the Ermyte and I shall heale you Go thy way seyde sir

Launcelot and deale nat wyth me Than the Ermyte ran his

way and there he mette wyth a goodly knyght // Sir seyde the

Ermyte here is faste by my place the goodlyest man that euer

I sawe and he ys sore wounded wyth a boore and yet he hath

slayne the bore But well I wote seyde the good man and

he be nat holpyn he shall dye of that wounde and Þat were

grete pite // Than that knyght at the desyre of Þe Ermyte

gate a carte and Þer in he put Þe boore and sir Launcelot for

he was so fyeble that he ^thei myght ryght easyly deale with hym

And so sir Launcelot was brought vnto the Ermytayge And

there the Ermyte healed hym of hys wounde But the

Ermyte myght nat fynde hym his sustenaunce and so


f. 337v (XII.3-4)

 

he empeyred and wexed fyeble bothe of body and of hys wytte

for defaute of sustenaunce he waxed more wooder than he was

a fore tyme · And than vppon a day sir Launcelot ran his way

in to the foreyste and by the adventure he com to the Cite of

Corbyn where dame Elayne was that bare Galahad sir Laun//

celottys sonne And so whan he was entyrde in to the towne

he ran thorow the towne to the castell and than all the yonge

men of that cite ran aftir sir Launcelot and there they threwe

turvis at hym and gaff hym many sad strokys And euer as

sir Launcelot myght reche ony of them he threw them so that

they wolde neuer com in hys hondes no more for of som he bra//

ke the leggys and armys and so he fledde in to the castell //

And than cam oute knyghtes and squyars and rescowed sir Launce//

lot whan they be hylde hym and loked vppon hys persone they

thought they neuer sawe so goodly a man And whan they sawe

so many woundys vppon hym they demed that he had bene

a man of worshyp And than they ordayned hym clothis to

hys body and straw and lytter vndir the gate of the castell

to lye in And so euery day they wolde throw hym mete and set

hym drynke But there was but feaw that wolde brynge

hym mete to hys hondys // So hit be felle that kyng Pel//

les had a neveaw whos name was Caster and so he desyred

of the kynge to be made knyght and at hys owne rekeyste

the kynge made hym knyght at the feste of Candylmasse

And whan sir Castor was made knyght that same day he gaff

many gownys And than sir Castor sente for the foole whych

was sir Launcelot And whan he was com a fore sir Castor he

gaff sir Launcelot a robe of scarlet and all that longed vnto

hym And whan sir Launcelot was so arayed lyke a knyght he

was the semelyeste man in all the courte and none so well

made // So whan he sye hys tyme he wente in to Þe gardyne


f. 338 (XII.4)

 

And there he layde hym downe by a welle and slepte And so

at aftir none dame Elayne and her maydyns cam in to the

gardyne to sporte them And as they romed vp and downe

one of dame Elaynes maydens a spyed where lay a goodly

man by the welle slepynge // Peas seyde dame Elayne &

sey no worde but shew me that man where he lyeth · So a

none she brought dame Elayne where he lay And whan Þat

she be hylde hym anone she felle in remembraunce of hym

and knew hym veryly for sir Launcelot and there wyth all

she felle on wepynge so hartely that she sanke evyn to the

erthe And whan she had thus wepte a grete whyle than

she arose and called her maydyns and sheyde she was syke

And so she yode oute of the gardyne as streyte to her fadir

as she cowde And there she toke hym by her selff a parte And

than she seyde a my dere fadir now I haue nede of your helpe

and but yf that ye helpe me now fare well my good dayes

for euer // what ys that doughter seyde kynge Pelles In youre

gardyne I was to sporte me And there by the welle I founde

sir Launcelot du lake slepynge · I may nat by leve hit seyde

kynge Pelles Truly sir he ys there she seyde And me semyth

he shulde be yet distracke oute of hys wytte Than holde yo

you stylle seyde the kynge and lat me deale // Than Þe kynge

called vnto hym suche as he moste trusted a ·iiij· persones And

dame Elayne hys doughter and dame Brusen her seruaunte

And whan they cam to the welle and be hylde sir Launcelot

A none dame Brusen seyde to the kynge we muste be wyse

how we deale wyth hym for thys knyght ys oute of hys

mynde and yf we a wake hym rudely for thys knyght ys

oute what he woll do we all know nat · And there fore a byde

ye a whyle and I shall throw and Inchauntemente vppon

hym that he shall nat a wake of an owre and so she ded

And than the kynge commaunded that all people shulde


f. 338v (XII.4-5)

 

a voyde that none shulde be in that way there as Þe kyng

wolde com // And so whan thys was done thes ·iiij· men

and thes ladyes layde honde on sir Launcelot And so they ba//

re hym in to a towre and so in a to a chambir where was

the holy vessell of the Sank Greall And by fore Þat holy

vessell sir Launcelot was layde And there cam an holy man

and vn hylled that vessell and so by myracle and by vertu

of that holy vessell sir Launcelot was heled and recouerde And

as sone as he was a waked he groned an syghed and com//

playned hym sore of hys woodnes and strokys that he

had had · And as sone as sir Launcelot saw kynge Pelles           

and dame Elayne he waxed a shamed and seyde thus A

lorde Jhu how cam I hydir for goddys sake my fayre

lorde lat me wyte how that I cam hydir // Sir seyde da//

me Elayne in to thys contrey ye cam lyke a mased man

clene oute of youre wytte And here haue ye ben kepte

as a foole and no cryature here knew what ye were

vntyll by fortune a mayden of myne brought me vnto

you where as ye lay slepynge by a well And anone as

I veryly be hylde you than I tolde my fadir and so were

ye brought a fore thys holy vessell and by the vertu of

hit thus were ye healed // A Jhu mercy seyde sir Launcelot

yf this be sothe how many be Þer that knowyth of my

woodnes // So god me helpe seyde dame Elayne no

mo but my fadir and I and dame Brusen Now for

crystes love seyde sir Launcelot kepe hit counceyle and lat

no man knowe hit in the worlde for I am sore a shamed

that I haue be mysse fortuned for I am banysshed Þe contrey

of Inglonde And so sir Launcelot lay more than a fourte//

nyght ou euer that he myght styrre for sorenes And than

vppon a day he seyde vnto dame Elayne thes wordis · Fayre

lady Elayne for youre sake I haue had muche care and


f. 339 (XII.5-6)

 

angwyshe hit nedyth nat to reherse hit ye know how Nat//

wythstondynge I know well I haue done fowle to you whan

that I drewe my swerde to you to haue slayne you vppon Þe

morne aftir whan that I had layne wyth you And all was

for the cause that ye and dame Brusen made me for to

lye by you magry myne hede And as ye sey sir Galahad your

sonne was be gotyn // That ys trouthe seyde dame Elay//

ne Than woll ye for my sake seyde sir Launcelot go ye vnto

youre fadir and gete me a place of hym where in I may

dwelle for in the courte of kynge Arthure may I neuer com

Sir seyde dame Eleyne I woll lyve and dye wyth you only

for youre sake and yf my lyff myght nat a vayle you and

my dethe myght a vayle you wyte you well I wolde dye

for youre sake And I woll to my fadir and I am ryght sure

there ys thynge that I can desyre of hym but I shall haue

hit · And wher ye be lorde sir Launcelot doute ye nat but I

woll be wyth you wyth all all the seruyse that I may do // So

furth wyth all she wente to her fadir And sayde sir my lorde

sir Launcelot desyreth to be hyre by you in som castell off

youres // well doughter seyde the kynge sytthyn hit is his

desyre to a byde in this marchis he shall be in the castell

of Blyaunte and there shall ye be wyth hym and ·xxti· of

the fayryste yonge ladyes that bene in thys contrey and

they shall be all of the grettyst blood in this contrey and

ye shall haue ·xxti· knyghtes wyth you for doughter I woll

that ye wyte we all be honowred by the blood of sir Launcelot

Than wente dame Elayne vnto sir Launcelot and tolde

hym all how her fadir had devysed // Than cam a knyght

whyche was called sir Castor that was neveaw vnto kynge

Pelles and he cam vnto sir Launcelot and asked hym what

was hys name // Sir seyde sir Launcelot my name ys le

shyvalere ill ma feete that ys to sey the knyght that


f. 339v (XII.6)

 

hath trespassed sir seyde sir Castor hit may well be so // But

euer me semyth youre name shulde be sir Launcelot du la//

ke for or now I haue seyne you Sir seyde sir Launcelot ye

as ar nat Jantyll for I put a case that my name were

sir Launcelot And that hyt lyste me nat to dyscouer my na//

me what shulde hit greve you here to kepe my counsell

and ye nat hurte there by But wyte you well and euer

hit lye in my power I shall greve you and euer I mete with

you in my way // Than sir Castor kneled a downe and be

sought sir Launcelot of mercy for I shall neuer vttir what

ye be whyle that ye ar in thys partyes // Than sir Launcelot

pardowned hym And so kynge Pelles wyth ·xxti· knyghtes and

dame Elayne wyth her ·xxti· ladyes rode vnto the castel·

of Blyaunte that stood in an Ilonde be closed envyrowne

wyth a fayre watir depe and layrge And whan they were

there sir Launcelot lat calle hit the Joyus Ile and there was

he called none oÞer wyse but le shyvalere ma fete Þe knyȝt

that hath trespast // Than sir Launcelot lete make hym a

shylde all of Sable and a quene crowned in the myddis

of syluer And a knyght clene armed knelynge a fore her

And euery day onys for ony myrthis that all the ladyes

myght make hym he wolde onys euery day loke towarde

the realme of Logrys where kynge Arthure and quene

Gwenyuer was And than wolde he falle vppon a wepyng

as hys harte shulde to braste // So hit be felle that tyme

sir Launcelot harde of a Justynge faste by wyth in ·iij· leagis

Than he called vnto hym a dwarff And he bade hym go

vnto that Justynge and or euer the knyghtes departe loke that

Þou make there a cry in hyrynge of all knyghtes that there

ys one knyght in Joyus Ile whyche ys the castell of Bly//

aunte and sey that hys name ys le Shyvalere ma fete

that woll Juste a yenst knyghtes all that woll com And


f. 340 (XII.6-7)

 

who that puttyth that knyght to the wars he shall haue

a fayre maydyn and a Jarfawcon So whan this cry was

cryed // vnto Joyus Ile drew the numbir of ·v C· knyghtes and wyte

you well there was neuer seyne in kynge Arthurs dayes

one knyght that ded so muche dedys of armys as sir Launce//

lot ded tho ·iij· dayes to gydyrs For as the boke makyth

truly mencyon he had the bettir of all the ·v C· knyghtes &

there was nat one slayne of them And aftir that sir Launce//

lot made them all a grete feste and in the meane whyle

cam sir Percyvale de galys and sir Ector de marys vndir Þat

castell whyche was called the Joyus Ile And as they be hylde

that gay castell they wolde haue gone to that castell but

they myght nat for the brode watir and brydge coude

they fynde none Than were they ware on the othir syde

where stoode a lady wyth a sparhawke on her honde And

sir Percyvale called vnto her and asked that lady who was in

that castell · Fayre knyghtes she seyde here wyth in thys

castell ys the fayryste lady in thys londe and her name is

dame Elayne Also we haue in thys castell one of the fay//

ryste knyghtes and the myghtyest man that ys I dare sey

lyvynge and he callyth hym selff le shyvalere ma fete //

how cam he in to thys marchys seyde sir Percyvale // Truly

seyde the damesell he cam in to thys contrey lyke a madde

man wyth doggys and boyes chasynge hym thorow the cyte

of Corbyn And by the holy vessell of the Sank greall he was

br^ought in to hys wytte a gayne but he woll nat do batayle

wyth no knyght but by vndirne or noone And yf ye lyste to

com in to the castell seyde the lady ye muste ryde vnto the

farther syde of the castell and there shall ye fynde a vessell

that woll beare you and youre horse Than they departed and

cam vnto the vessell And than sir Percyvale a lyght And sayde

vnto sir Ector de marys ye shall a byde me hyre vntyll that


f. 340v (XII.7)

 

I wyte what maner a knyght he ys · For hit were shame vn

to vs in as muche as he ys but one knyght and w shulde

bothe do batayle wyth hym ·/ Do as ye lyste seyde Syr

Ector and here I shall a byde you vntyll that I hyre off

you Than passed sir Percyvale the water and whan he cam

to the castell gate he seyde vnto the porter go Þou to

good knyght of this castell and telle hym hyre ys com

an arraunte knyght to Juste wyth hym // Than Þe porter

yode in and cam a gayne and bade hym ryde in to the

comyn place there as the Justynge shall be where

lordys and ladyes may be holde you And so a none

as sir Launcelot had a warnynge he was sone redy And

there sir Percyvale and sir Launcelot were com bothe

they encountirde wyth such a myght and there spearys

were so rude that bothe the horsys and the knyghtys

fell to the grounde Than they a voyded there horsys &

flange oute there noble swerdys and hew a way many

cantels of there shyldys and so hurteled to gydyrs lyke

ij· borys and aythir wounded othir passynge sore And

so at the laste sir Percyvale spake fyrste whan they

had foughtyn there longe more than ·ij· owres //

Now fayre knyght seyde sir Percyvale I requyre

you of youre knyghthode to telle me youre name

for I mette neuer wyth suche a noÞer knyght // Sir as

for my name seyde sir Launcelot I woll nat hyde

hyt frome you but my name ys le shyvalere ma fete

Now telle me your name seyde sir Launcelot I requyre you

Truly seyde sir Percyvale my name ys sir Percyvale de

Galys that was brothir vnto the good knyght Sir

Lamorak de galys and kynge Pellynor was oure

fadir And sir Agglovale ys my brothir Alas seyde sir Laun//

celot what haue I done to fyght wyth you whyche ar

 

 

 

                                A knyght of

 

f. 341 (XII.7-9)

 

a knyȝt of

^ the table rounde and som tyme I was youre And there wyth

all sir Launcelot kneled downe vppon hys kneys and threwe a

way hys shylde and hys swerde frome hym // whan sir Percyvale

sawe hym do so he mervayled what he meaned And than he

seyde thus sir knyght what som euer he be I requyre you vppon

the hyȝe order of knyghthode to telle me youre trewe name

Than he answerde and seyde so god me helpe my name ys

sir Launcelot du lake kynge Gannys son of Benoy // Alas than

seyde sir Percyvale what haue I now done for I was sente by

the quene for to seke you and so I haue sought you nyȝ thys

ij· yere And yondir ys sir Ector de marys youre brothir whyche

a bydyth me on the yondir syde of the watyr And there fore

for goddys sake seyde sir Percyvale for gaff gyffe me myne

offencys that I haue here done // Sir hyt ys sone for gyvyn

seyde sir Launcelot Than sir Percyvale sente for sir Ector de

marys And whan sir Launcelot had a syght of hym he ran

vnto hym and toke hym in hys armys and than sir Ector

kneled downe and aythir wepte vppon othir that all men

had pite to be holde them // Than cam forthe dame Elayne

and she made them grete chere as myght be made And there

she tolde sir Ector and sir Percyvale how and in what maner

sir Launcelot cam in to that contrey And how he was heled //

And there hyt was knowyn how longe sir Launcelot was with

sir Blyaunte and wyth sir Selyvaunte And how he fyrste

mette wyth them departed frome them by cause he was hurte

wyth a boore And how the Ermyte healed hym off hys

grete wounde And how that he cam to the cite of Corbyn

N

Ow leve we sir Launcelot In Joyus Ile wyth hys

lady dame Elayne and sir Percyvale and sir Ector de


f. 341v (XII.9)

 

playynge wyth them And now turne we vnto sir Bors de

Ganys and vnto sir Lyonell that had sought sir Launcelot long

nye by the space of ij· yere and neuer coude they hyre of hym

And as they thus rode by aduenture they cam to the house

of kynge Brandegorys and there sir Bors was well kno//

wyn for he had gotyn a chylde vppon the kynges doughtir

xv· yere to fore and hys name was Elyne le blanke

And whan sir Bors sawe that chylde he lyked hym pas//

synge well And so thoo knyghtes had good chere of kynge

Brandegorys and seyde here ys my sonne Elyne le

blanke and syth hyt ys so I wyll that ye wyte I woll

haue hym wyth me vnto the courte of kynge Arthur

Sir seyde the kynge ye may well take hym wyth you

but he ys as yet ouer tendir of ayge As for that seyde

sir Bors yet I woll haue hym wythe me and brynge

hym to the howse of moste worshyp in the worlde //

So whan sir Bors shulde departe there was made grete

sorow for the departynge of Helyne le blanke But at Þe

laste they departed and wyth in a whyle they cam vnto

Camelot where as was kynge Arthure And so whan

kynge Arthure vndirstoode that Helyne le blanke

was sir Bors son and neveaw vnto kynge Brande//

gorys Than kynge Arthure let make hym knyghte

of the rounde table and so he preved a good knyghte

and an aduenturus // And now woll we to oure ma//

ter of sir Launcelot so hyt be felle on a day that sir Ector

and sir Percyvale cam vnto sir Launcelot and asked of

hym what he wolde do and whethir he wolde go wyth

them vnto kynge Arthure // Nay seyde sir Launcelott

that may I nat do by no meane for I was so vengeabely


f. 342 (XII.9-10)

 

deffended the courte that I caste me neuer to com there

more // Sir seyde sir Ector I am youre brothir and ye ar

the man in the worlde that I love moste and yf I vndir//

stoode that hyt were youre dysworshyp ye may vndirston//

de that I wolde neuer counceyle you there to // But kynge

Arthure and all hys knyghtes and in especiall quene Gwe//

nyuer makyth suche dole and sorow for you that hyt ys

mervayle to hyre and se And ye muste remembir the

grete worshyp and renowne that ye be off how that ye

haue bene more spokyn of than ony othir knyght that ys

now lyvynge for there ys none that beryth the name

now but ye and sir Trystram and there fore broÞer seyde

sir Ector make you redy to the courte wyth vs And I

dare sey and make hyt good seyde sir Ector hyt hath coste

my lady the quene xxti· Ml· li the sekynge of you // Welle 

brothir seyde sir Launcelot I woll do aftir youre counceyle

and ryde wyth you // So than they toke and made redy

and anone they toke there leve at kynge Pelles and at

dame Elayne And whan sir Launcelot shulde departe dame

Elayne mad grete sorow My lorde sir Launcelot seyde

dame Elayne thys same feste of Pentecoste shall youre

sonne and myne Galahad be made knyght for he ys now

fully ·xv· wynter olde // Madame do as ye lyste seyde

sir Launcelot and god gyff hym grace to preve a good knyȝt

As for that seyde dame Elayne I doute nat he shall preve

the beste man of hys kynne excepte one // Than shall

he be a good man I nowȝe seyde sir Launcelot // So a none

they departed And wyth in ·xv dayes Journey they cam vnto

Camelot that ys in englyshe calle Wynchester And whan

sir Launcelot was com in a monge them the kygne and all


f. 342v (XII.10-11)

 

the knyghtes made grete Joy of hys home commynge // And

there sir Percyvale and sir Ector de marys be gan and tol//

de the hole aduentures how sir Launcelot had bene oute of

hys mynde in the tyme of hys abcence And how he called

hym selff le shyvalere ma fete the knyght that had trespast

And in ·iij· dayes wyth in Joyus Ile sir Launcelot smote dow//

ne v·C· knyghtes And euer as sir Ector and sir Percyvale

tolde thes talys of sir Launcelot quene Gwenyuer wepte

as she shulde haue dyed // Than the quene made hym

grete chere // A Jhu seyde kynge Arthure I mervayle for

what cause ye sir Launcelot wente oute of youre mynde

for I and many othir deme hyt was for the love of fayre

Elayne the doughtir of kynge Pelles by whom ye ar

noysed that ye haue gotyn a chylde and hys name ys Ga//

gys // My lorde seyde sir Launcelot yf I ded ony foly I

haue that I sought And there wyth all the kynge spake

no more But all sir Launcelottys kynnesmen knew for whom

he wente oute of hys mynde And than there was made

grete feystys and grete Joy was there a monge them And

all lordys and ladyes made grete Joy whan they harde

how Sir Launcelot was com a gayne vnto the courte

N

Ow woll we leve of thys mater and speke we off

sir Launcelot and of sir Palomydes that was the

Sareȝen vncrystynde whan sir Trystram was com home

vnto Joyus Garde frome hys aduentures // And all thys why//

le that sir Launcelot was thus myste ·ij· yere and more sir

Trystram bare the brewte and renowne thorow all the

realme of Logrys and many stronge aduentures he felle


f. 343 (XII.11)

 

hym and full well and worshypfully he brought hem to an

ende // So whan he was com home la beall Isode tolde off

the grete feste that sholde be at Pentecoste nexte folowyn//

ge and there she tolde hym how sir Launcelot had bene myssed

ij· yere and all that whyle he had bene oute of hys mynde

and how he was holpyn by the holy vessell of the Sank gre//

all // Alas seyde sir Try Trystram that caused som debate be

twyxte hym and quen Gwenyuer // Sir seyde dame Isode I

knowe hyt all for quene Gwenyuer sente me a lettir all how

hyt was done for be cause I sholde requyre you to seke hym

And now blessyd be god seyde la beall Isode he ys hole and soun//

de and comyn a yen to the courte // A Jhu there of am I fayne

seyde sir Trystram and now shall ye and I make vs redy for

bothe ye and I woll be at that feste // Sir seyde dame Isode

and hyt please you I woll nat be there for thorow me ye

bene marked of many good knyghtes and that causyth you for

to haue muche more laboure for my sake than nedyth you

to haue // Than woll I nat be there seyde sir Trystram but

yf ye be there // God deffende seyde la beall Isode for than

shall I be spokyn of shame a monge all quenys and ladyes

of astate for ye that ar called one of the nobelyste knyghtys

of the worlde and a knyght of the rounde table how may ye

be myssed at that feste for what shall be sayde of you a mon//

ge all knyghtes // A se how sir Trystram huntyth and hawkyth

and cowryth wyth in a castell wyth hys lady and for sakyth

vs // Alas shall som sey hyt ys pyte that euer he was knyght or

euer he shulde haue the love of a lady // Also what shall quenys

and ladyes say of me hyt ys pyte that I haue my lyff that I

wolde holde so noble a knyght as ye ar frome hys worshyp

So god me helpe seyde sir Trystram vnto la beall Isode hyt


f. 343v (XII.11-12)

 

ys passyngly well seyde of you and nobely counceyled ·/ And

now I well vndirstonde that ye love me and lyke as ye haue

counceyled me I woll do a parte there aftir But there shall

no man nor chylde ryde wyth me but my selff a lone //

And so I woll ryde on tewysday next commynge and no mo//

re harneyse of warre but my speare and my swerde //

And so whan the day com Sir Trystram toke hys leve

at la beall Isode and she sente wyth hym ·iiij· knyghtys

And wyth in halff a myle he sente them a gayne And with

in a myle way aftir sir Trystram sawe a fore hym where

sir Palomydes had stryken downe a knyght and all moste

wounded hym to the dethe // Than sir Trystram repented

hym that he was nat armed and there wyth he hoved

stylle // And anone as sir Palomydes saw sir Trystram he

cryed on hyght sir Trystram now be we mette for or we

departe we shall redresse all oure olde sorys // As for that

seyde sir Trystram there was neuer yet no crystyn man that

euer myght make hys boste that euer I fledde from hym · And

wyte Þou well sir Palomydes Þou that arte a Sareȝen shal

neuer make thy boste that euer sir Trystram de lyones shall

fle fro the // And there wyth sir Trystram made hys horse

to ren And wyth all hys myght he cam streyte vppon sir

Palomydes and braste hys speare vppon hym at an ·C·

pecis And furth wyth all sir Trystram drewe hys swerde

and than he turned hys horse and stroke to gydyrs ·vj· grete

strokys vppon hys helme // And than sir Palomydes stode

stylle and by hylde sir Trystram and mervayled gretely at

hys woodnes and of hys foly // And than sir Palomydes

seyde vnto hym selff and thys sir Trystram were armed

hyt were harde to cese hym frome hys batayle And yff


f. 344 (XII.12-13)

 

I turne a gayne and sle hym I am shamed where som evir

I go // Than sir Trystram spake and seyde Þou cowarde

knyght what castyste Þou to do and why wolt Þou nat do

batayle wyth me for haue Þou no doute I shall endure

the and all thy malyce // A Sir Trystram seyde sir Palo//

mydes full well Þou wotyste I may nat haue a do wyth

the for shame for Þou arte here naked and I am armede

and yf that I sle the dyshonoure shall be myne And well

Þou wotyste seyde sir Palomydes vnto sir Trystram I knowe

thy strengthe and thy hardynes to endure a yenste a goode

knyght // That ys trouthe seyde sir Trystram I vndirstonde

thy valyauntenesse // ye say well seyde sir Palomydes Now I

requyre you telle me a questyon that I shall sey vnto you //

Than telle me what hyt ys seyde sir Trystram and I shall

answere you of the trouthe as god me helpe // Sir I put a

case seyde sir Palomydes that ye were armed at all ryghtes

as well as I am and I naked as ye be what wolde ye do to

me now be youre trewe knyghthode // A seyde sir Trystram

now I vndirstonde the well sir Palomydes for now muste I

sey myne owne Jugemente And as god me blysse that I shal·

sey shall nat be seyde for no feare that I haue of the · Sir

Palomydes But thys ys all wyte Þou well sir Palomy//

des as at thys tyme Þou sholdyst departe from me for I wol//

de nat haue a do wyth the // No more woll I seyde Sir

Palomydes And there fore ryde furth on thy way // As for

that seyde sir Trystram I may chose othir to ryde othir to

go // But sir Palomydes seyde sir Trystram I mervayle

greatly of one thynge that Þou arte so good a knyght that

Þou wolt nat be crystynde And thy brothir sir Saffir hath

bne bene crystynde many a day // As for that seyde sir Palomydes


f. 344v (XII.13)

 

I may nat yet be crystyned for a vowe that I haue made many

yerys a gone how be hyt in my harte and in my soule I haue

had many a day a good be leve in Jhu cryste and hys mylde

modir mary but I haue but one batayle to do and were

that onys done I wolde be baptyȝed // Be my hede seyde

sir Trystram as for one batayle Þou shalt nat seke hyt

longe For god deffende seyde sir Trystram that thorow

my defaute Þou sholdyste lengar lyve thus a Saraȝyn for

yondyr ys a knyght that ye haue hurte and smyttyn

downe // Now helpe me than that I were armed in hys

armoure and I shall sone full fyll thyne a vowys // As

ye wyll seyde sir Palomydes so shall hyt be // So they

rode bothe vnto that knyght that sate vppon a banke

And than sir Trystram salewed hym and he waykely

salewed hym a gayne // Sir knyght seyde sir Trystram

I requyre you telle me youre ryght name // Syr he

seyde my ryght name ys sir Galleron off Galowey

and a knyght of the table rounde // So god me helpe

seyde sir Trystram I am ryght hevy of youre hurtys

But thys ys all I muste pray you to leane me youre

hole armoure for ye se that I am vnarmed and I

muste do batayle wyth thys knyght // Sir ye shall haue

hyt wyth a good wyll but ye muste be ware for I

warne you that knyght ys an hardy knyght as euer

I mette wyth all // But sir seyde sir Galeron I pray

you telle me youre name and what ys that knyghtes

name that hath beatyn me // Sir as for my name

wyte you well ys sir Trystram de lyones and as for

hym hys name ys sir Palomydes brothir vnto the

good knyght sir Sapher and yet ys sir Palomydes


f. 345 (XII.13-14)

 

vncrystynde // Alas seyde sir Galleron that ys grete pyte

that so good a knyght and so noble a man off armys shol//

de be vncrystynde // So god me helpe seyde sir Trystram

owthyr he shall sle me othir I hym but that he shall

be crystynde or euer we departe in sundir // My lorde

sir Trystram seyde sir Galleron youre renowne and

worshyp ys well knowyn thorow many realmys and

god save you thys day from senshyp and shame // Than

sir Trystram vnarmed sir Galleron the whyche was

a noble knyght and had done many dedys of armys

and he was a large knyght of fleyshe and boone

And whan he was vnr vnarmed he stood on hys

feete for he was sore brused in the backe wyth a

speare // yet as well as sir Galleron myght he ar//

med sir Trystram And than sir Trystram moun//

ted vppon hys horse And in hys honde he gate sir

Galleron hys speare And there wyth all sir Palo//

mydes was redy and so they cam hurtelynge to gy//

dyrs and aythir smote othir in myddys off there

shyldys And there wyth all sir Palomydes speare

brake And sir Trystram smote downe sir Palo//

mydes horse and man to the erthe And than sir

Palomydes as sone as he myght avoyded hys horse

and dressed hys shylde and pulled oute hys swerde

That sawe sir Trystram and there wyth all he a

lyght and tyed hys horse to a tre And than they cam

to gydyrs Egirly as ·ij· wylde borys and so they layshed

to gydyrs trasynge and trauersynge as noble men that

offten had bene well proved in batayle But euer sir Pa//

lomydes dred passynge sore the myght of sir Trystram


f. 345v (XII.14)

 

and there fore he suffyrd hym to breeth hym And thus they

faught more than ·ij· owrys but oftyn tymes sir Trystram

smote suche strokys at sir Palomydes that he made hym

to knele // And sir Palomydes brake and kutte many pecis

of sir Trystrams shylde // And than sir Palomydes wounded

sir Trystram passynge sore for he was a well fyghtynge

man // Than sir Trystram waxed wood wrothe oute off

mesure and russhed vppon sir Palomydes wyth suche a

myght that sir Palomydes felle grovelynge to the erthe

and there wyth all he lepe vp lyghtly vppon hys feete // And

than sir Trystram wounded sore sir Palomydes thorow

the shuldir And euer sir Trystram fought stylle in lyke harde

And sir Palomydes fayled hym nat but gaff hym many sad

strokys a gayne And at the laste sir Trystram doubeled

hys strokys vppon hym And by fortune sir Trystram smote

sir Palomydes swerde oute of hys honde And yf sir Palomy//

des has stouped for hys swerde he had bene slayne // And than

sir Palomydes stood stylle and be hylde hys swerde wyth

a sorowfull harte // how now sayde sir Trystram for now I

haue the at a vauntayge seyde sir Trystram as Þou haddist

me thys day but hyt shall neuer be seyde in no courte nor a

monge no good knyghtes that sir Trystram shall sle ony knyȝt

that ys wepynles And there fore take Þou thy swerde and lat

vs make an ende of thys batayle // As for to do thys batayle seyde

sir Palomydes I dare ryght well ende hyt But I haue

no grete luste to fyght no more And for thys cause seyde sir

Palomydes Myne offence ys to you nat so grete but that

we may be fryendys · For all that I haue offended ys and was

for the love of la beall Isode And as for her I dare say she ys

pyerles of all othir ladyes And also I profyrd her neuer no maner


f. 346 (XII.14)

 

of dyshonoure and by her I haue getyn the moste parte of my

worshyp And sytthyn I deffended neuer as to her owne persone //

And as for the offence that I haue done hyt was a yenste youre

owne persone And for that deffence ye haue gyvyn me thys day

many sad strokys and som I haue gyffyn you a gayne And now

I dare sey I felte neuer man of youre myght nothir so well brethed

But yf ^hit were sir Launcelot du laake where fore I requyre you

my lorde for gyff me all that I haue offended vnto you // And

thys same day haue me to the nexte churche And fyrste lat

me be clene conffessed and aftir that se youre selff that I

be truly baptysed And than woll we all ryde to gydyrs

vnto the courte of kynge Arthure that we may be there

at the nexte hyȝe feste folowynge // Than take youre

horse seyde sir Trystram and as ye sey so shall hyt be and

all my evyll wyll god for gyff hyt you and I do And here

by wyth In thys myle ys the Suffrygan of Carlehylle

whyche shall gyff you the Sacramente of baptyme And

anone they toke there horsys and sir Galleron rode wyth·

them And whan they cam to the Suffrygan sir Trystram

tolde hym there desyre Than the Suffrygan let fylle a

grete vessell wyth watyr And whan he had halowed hyt

he than conffessed clene sir Palomydes and sir Trystram

and sir Galleron were hys ·ij· god fadyrs And than sone

afftyr they departed and rode towade Camelot where

that kynge Arthure and quene Gwenyvir was and

the moste party of all the knyghtes of the rounde table

were there also // And so the kynge and all the courte we//

re ryght glad that sir Palomydes was crystynde // And

that same feste In cam sir Galahad that was son vnto sir

Launcelot du lake and sate In the Syge perelous And so there


f. 346v (XII.14)

 

wyth all they departed and dysceyvirde all the knyghtys of

the rounde table // And than sir Trystram returned vn//

to Joyus Garde And sir Palomydes folowed aftir the ques//

tynge beste // Here endyth the secunde boke off Syr

Trystram de Lyones whyche drawyn was oute of fre//

ynshe by Sir Thomas Malleorre knyght as Jhu be

hys helpe Amen // But here ys no rehersall of the thir//

de booke But here folowyth the noble tale off the

Sanke Greall whyche called ys the holy vessell and the

Sygnyfycacion of blyssed bloode off oure lorde Jhu Cryste

whyche was brought in to thys londe by Joseph· off

Aramathye there fore on all synfull blyssed lorde haue

on thy knyght mercy · Amen


 

 


¶ Capitulum lxxiiij

THenne there was a crye vnto all knyghtes that when they herd an horne blowe they shold make Iustes as they dyd the fyrst day / And lyke as the bretheren sire Page  543 [leaf 272r] Edward and sir Sadok beganne the Iustes the fysrt daye / sir Vwayne the kynges sone Vreyn and sir lucanere de buttelere beganne the Iustes the second day / And at the fyrst encountre syr Vwayne smote doune the kynges sone of Scottes / and syr Lucanere ranne ageynste the kynge of walys / and they brake their speres alle to pyeces / and they were soo fyers bothe / that they hurtled to gyders that bothe felle to the erthe /

¶ Thenne they of Dorkeney horsed ageyne syr Lucanere / And thenne came in syr Tristram de Lyones / and thenne syr Tristram smote doune syr Vwayne / and syre Lucanere and syre Palomydes smote doune other two Knyghtes / and syre Gareth smote doune other two knyghtes / Thenne said syre Arthur vnto syr Launcelot / see yonder thre knyghtes doo passyngly wel / & namely the fyrst that Iusted / Sir said launcelot that Knygthe beganne not yet / but ye shalle see hym this day doo merueyllously / and thenne came in to the place the dukes sone of Orkeney / and thenne they beganne to do many dedes of armes /

¶ Whan syre Tristram sawe them soo begynne / he said to Palomydes / how fele ye your self / maye ye doo this daye as ye dyd yesterday / Nay said Palomydes I fele me self soo wery and soo sore brysed of the dedes of yesterday that I maye not endure as I dyd yesterday / That me repenteth said syre Tristram / for I shall lacke yow this day / Sire Palomydes saide truste not to me / for I maye not doo as I dyd / alle these wordes said Palomydes for to begyle syr Tristram / Syr said syr Tristram vnto syr Gareth thenne muste I truste vpon yow wherfor I praye yow be not ferre from me to rescowe me / and nede be said Gareth I shalle not fayle yow in alle that I maye doo

¶ Thenne syr Palomydes rode by hym self / and thenne in despyte of syr Tristram he putte hym self in the thyckest prees amonge them of Dorkeney / and there he dyd soo merueyllous dedes of armes that alle men had wonder of hym / for there myghte none stande hym a stroke / whanne syre Tristram sawe syre Palomydes doo suche dedes / he merueylled and sayd to hym self / he is wery of my company / Soo syr Tristram beheld hym a grete whyle and dyd but lytel els / for the noyse and crye was soo huge / and grete / that syre Tristram merueylled / from whens came the strengthe that sire Palomydes had there Page  544 [leaf 272v] in the felde / Syr said sire Gareth vnto syr Tristram / remembre ye not of the wordes that syr Dynadan sayd to yow yesterday when he called yow coward / for sothe sir said it none yl for ye are the man in the world that he moost loueth / and alle that he sayd was for your worship / And therfore said sir Gareth to sir Tristram lete me knowe this daye what ye be / & wondre ye not soo vpon sire Palomydes / for he enforceth hym self to wynne alle the worship and honour from yow / I maye well byleue it said sir Tristram / And sythen I vndestande his euyl wylle and his enuy / ye shalle see / yf that I enforce my selfe / that the noyse shalle be lefte that now is vpon hym / Thenne sire Tristram rode in to the thyckest of the prees / & thenne he dyd soo merueyllously wel / and dyd soo grete dedes of armes that alle men sayd that sire Tristram dyd double so moche dedes of armes as syre Palomydes had done afore hand / And thenne the noyse wente playne from sire Palomydes / and alle the peple cryed vpon sir Tristram / O Ihesu said the peple see how sire Tristram smytheth doune with his spere soo many knyghtes / And see saide they all how many knyghtes he smyteth doune with his suerd / and of how many knyghtes he rasshed of their helmes and their sheldes / and soo he bete them al of Orkeney afore hym / How now said sir launcelot vnto kynge Arthur / I told yow that this daye there wold a knyȝt playe his pagent / yonder rydeth a knyȝt ye may see he doth knyghtely / for he hath strenghte and wynde / So god me help said Arthur to Launcelot ye saye sothe / for I sawe neuer a better knyghte / for he passeth fer sire Palomydes / Syre wete ye well sayd launcelot hit muste be soo of ryghte / for hit is hym selfe that noble knyght syr Tristram / I maye ryght wel byleue it said Arthur / But whan sire Palomydes herd the noyse and the crye was torned from hym / he rode oute on a parte / and beheld sir Tristram / And whanne sire Palomydes sawe sir Tristram do so merueyllously wel / he wepte passyngly sore for despyte / for he wiste wel / he shold no worship wynne that daye / for wel knewe sire Palomydes whanne sire Tristram wold put forth his strengthe and his manhode he shold gete but lytyl worship that daye

Page  545 [leaf 273r]

¶ Capitulum lxxv

THenne came kynge Arthur and the kynge of Northgalys / and sir Launcelot du lake and sire Bleoberis sire Bors de ganys / sir Ector de maris / these thre knyghtes came in to the feld with sire launcelot / And thenne sire Launcelot with the thre knyghtes of his kynne dyd soo grete dedes of armes that alle the noyse beganne vpon sir launcelot / And soo they bete the kynge of walys and the kyng of scottes ferre abak / and made them to auoyde the felde / but sir Tristram and sir Gareth abode stylle in the felde and endured all that euer there came / that alle men had wonder that ony knyght myght endure soo many strokes / But euer sir launcelot & his thre kynnesmen by the cammaūdement of syr launcelot forbare sir Tristram / Thenne said sir Arthur is that sir Palomydes that endureth soo wel / nay sayd launcelot / wete ye wel it is good knyght sir Tristram / for yonder ye maye see syr Palomydes beholdeth and houeth and doth lytel or noughte / And sire ye shalle vnderstande that sire Tristram weneth thys day to bete vs alle oute of the felde / And as for me said sire launcelot I shal not bete hym / bete hym who soo wil / Sir said Launcelot vnto Arthur ye maye see how sir Palomydes houeth yonder / as though he were in a dreme / wete ye wel he is ful heuy that Tristram doth suche dedes of armes / Thenne is he but a foole said Arthur/ for neuer was sire Palomydes / nor neuer shalle be of suche prowesse as sir Tristram / And yf he haue ony enuy at sir Tristram and cometh in with hym vpon his syde he is a fals knyghte /

¶ As the kynge and sir Launcelot thus spake / sir Tristram rode pryuely oute of the prees / that none aspyed hym / but la Beale Isoud and sir Palomydes / for they two wold not lete of their eyen vpon sir Tristram /

¶ And whanne sir Tristram cam to his pauelions he fond sire Dynadan in his bedde a slepe / Awake said Tristram / ye ouȝt to be ashamed soo to slepe whan knyghtes haue ado in the feld Thenne syr Dynadan arose lyghtely and said syr what wylle ye that I shalle doo / make yow redy said syr Tristram to ryde with me in to the felde / Soo whan syr Dynadan was armed he loked vpon syre Tristrams helme and on his shelde / and Page  546 [leaf 273v] whan he sawe soo many strokes vpon his helme and vpon his shelde / he said in good tyme was I thus a slepe / For hadde I ben with yow / I must nedes for shame there haue folowed yow / more for shame than ony prowesse / that is in me / that I see wel now by tho strokes that I shold haue ben truly beten as I was yesterdaye / Leue youre Iapes said sire Tristram / & come of that were in the felde ageyne / what sayd sire Dynadan is your herte vp / yester daye ye ferd as though ye had dremed / Soo thenne sir Tristram was arayed in black harneis / O Ihesu said Dynadan what eyleth yow this day / me semeth ye be wylder than ye were yesterday / Thenne smyled syr Tristram and sayd to Dynadan awayte wel vpon me / yf ye see me ouermatched / loke that ye be euer behynde me / and I shalle make yow redy way by goddes grace / Soo sir Tristram and syre Dynadan took their horses / Alle this aspyed sir palomydes / bothe their goynge and their comynge / and soo dyd la Beale Isoud / for she knewe sir Tristram aboue alle other

¶ Capitulum lxxvj

THenne whanne sire Palomydes sawe that sir Tristram was desguysed / thenne he thoughte to doo hym a shame / Soo syre Palomydes rode to a knyghte that was sore wounded that satte vnder a fayre welle from the felde / Syr knyghte said sire Palomydes I pray you to lene me your armour / and your shelde / for myn is ouer wel knowen in this felde / and that hath done me grete dommage / and ye shall haue myn armour and my shelde that is as sure as yours / I wille wel said the knyghte that ye haue myn armour and my shelde / yf they may doo yow ony auayle / So sire Palomydes armed hym hastely in that Knyghtes armoure & his sheld that shone as ony crystall or syluer and soo he came rydynge in to the felde / And thenne ther was neyther sire Tristram nor none of kynge Arthurs party that knewe sir Palomydes /

¶ And ryght soo as sir Palomydes was come in to the feld syr Tristram smote doune thre Knyghtes euen in the syght of sir Palomydes / And thenne sir Palomydes rode ageynst syre Page  547 [leaf 274r] Tristram / and eyther mette other with grete speres / that they braste to their handes / And thenne they dasshed to gyder with swerdes egerly / Thenne sire Tristram had merueylle what knyghte he was that dyd bataill so knyghtely with hym / Thenne was sir Tristram wrothe / for he felte hym passynge stronge so that he demed he myghte not haue adoo with the remenaunt of the knyȝtes by cause of the strengthe of sire palomydes

¶ Soo they lasshed to gyder and gaf many sadde strokes to gyders / and many knyghtes merueylled what knyghte he myghte be that soo encountred with the black knyghte sir tristram / ful wel knewe la Beale Isoud there was syre palomydes that fought with sir Tristram / for he aspyed al in her wyndowe where that she stode / as syr palomydes chaunged his harneis with the wounded knyghte / And thenne she beganne to wepe so hertely for the despyte of syr palomydes that ther she swouned / Thenne came in syr laūcelot with the knyghtes of Orkeney / And whanne the other party had aspyed sir Launcelot / they cryed / retorne retorne / here cometh syre launcelot du lake / Soo there came knyghtes and sayd syr launcelot ye must nedes fyghte with yonder knyght in the black harneis that was syr Tristram / for he hath al moost ouercome that good knyghte that fyghteth with hym with the syluer shelde that was syr palomydes / Thenne sir launcelot rode betwix sir Tristram and syr palomydes / and syr launcelot said to palomydes / syr knyghte lete me haue the batail / for ye haue nede to be reposed / Syr palomydes knewe syr launcelot wel / and so dyd syre Tristram / but by cause syr Launcelot was ferre hardyer knyght than hym self / therfor he was gladde / and suffred syr launcelot to fyghte with syr Tristram / For wel wyste he that syre launcelot knewe not sir Tristram / and there he hoped that syr launcelot shold bete or shame syre Tristram / wherof syre palomydes was ful fayne / and soo syr launcelot gaf syr Tristram many sadde strokes / but syre launcelot knewe not sir Tristram / but sir Tristram knewe wel syre launcelot / And thus they fought longe to gyders that la Beale Isoud was wel nygh oute of her mynde for sorou / thenne syr Dynadan told sir Gareth how þt knyȝt in the black harneis was sir tristrā & this is laūcelot þt fyȝteth with hym þt must nedes haue Page  548 [leaf 274v] the better of hym / for sir Tristram hath had to moche trauaylle this day / Thenne lete vs smyte hym doune said syre Gareth / so it is better that we doo said sire Dynadan thenne sir Tristram be shamed / for yonder houeth the stronge knyghte with the syluer sheld to falle vpon syre Tristram yf nede be / Thenne forthe with alle Gareth rasshed vpon syre launcelot / and gaf hym a grete stroke vpon his helme soo hard that he was astonyed And thenne came syr Dynadan with a spere / and he smote syr launcelot suche a buffet that hors and alle felle to the erthe O Ihesu said syr Tristram to syre Gareth and syre Dynadan fy for shame why dyd ye smyte doune soo good a knyght as he is / and namely whan I had adoo with hym / now ye doo your self grete shame / and hym no disworship / For I helde hym resonable hote though ye had not holpen me / Thenne cam syre palomydes that was desguysed and smote doune syr Dynadan from his hors / Thenne syr launcelot by cause syr Dynadan had smyten hym afore hand / thenne syr launcelot assailed syre Dynadan passynge sore / and syre Dynadan defended hym myghtely / but wel vnderstood syr Tristram that syre Dynadan myghte not endure syr launcelot / wherfor syr Tristram was sory / Thenne came syre palomydes fresshe vpon syre Tristram / And whanne syr Tristram sawe hym come / he thoughte to delyuer hym at ones by cause that he wold helpe syre Dynadan by cause he stode in grete perylle with syr Launcelot

¶ Thenne syre Tristram hurteled vnto syre palomydes & gafe hym a grete buffet / and thenne sir Tristram gate sir palomydes and pulled hym doune vnder nethe hym / And so felle sir Tristram with hym / and syr Tristram lepte vp lyghtely and lefte sir palomydes and wente betwixe sir launcelot and Dynadan / and thenne they beganne to do bataille to gyders /

¶ Ryght soo sire Dynadan gat sir Tristrams hors and said on hyghe that sir Launcelot myght here it / my lord sir Tristrā take yours hors / And whanne sire Launcelot herd hym nename sir Tristram / O Ihesu said launcelot what haue I done I am dishonoured / A my lord syre Tristram said Launcelot / why were ye desguysed / ye haue put your self in grete perille this daye / But I praye you noble Knyghte to pardone me / for and I had knowen yow we had not done this bataille / Page  549 [leaf 275r] Sir said sir Tristram this is not the fyrst kyndenes ye shewed me / soo they were bothe horsed ageyne / Thenne alle the people on the one syde gaf sir laūcelot the honour and the degree / & on the other syde all the people gaf to the noble knyȝt sir tristram the honour and the degree / but launcelot sayd nay ther to/ for I am not worthy to haue this honour / for I wil reporte me vnto alle knyghtes that sir Tristram hath ben lenger in the felde than I / and he hath smyten doun many moo knyghtes thys day than I haue done / And therfore I wille gyue sire Tristram my voyce and my name / and so I praye alle my lordes & felawes soo to doo / Thenne there was the hole voyce of dukes and Erles / Barons and knyghtes / that syr Tristram thys day is preued the best knyghte

¶ Capitulum lxxvij

THenne they blewe vnto lodgynge / and Quene Isoud was ledde vnto her pauelions / but wete yow wel she was wrothe oute of mesure with syr Palomydes / for she sawe alle this treason from the begynnynge to the endynge / And all this whyle neyther syr Tristram neyther sir Gareth nor Dynadan knewe not of the treason of sir Palomydes / but afterward ye shalle here that there befelle the grettest debate betwixe syre Tristram and sire Palomydes that myghte be / So whanne the turnement was done / sir Tristram Gareth and Dynadan rode with la Beale Isoud to these pauelions / And euer sire Palomydes rode with them in theyr company desguysed as he was But whanne sir Tristram had aspyed hym that he was the same knyghte with the sheld of syluer / that helde hym soo hote that day / Sir knyghte said sire Tristram wete yow wel here is none that hath nede of youre felauship / and therfore I praye yow departe from vs /

¶ Sire Palomydes ansuerd ageyne as though he had not knowen sir Tristram / wete yow wel sir knyhte from this felaushuip wille I neuer departe / for one of the best knyghtes of the world commaunded me to be in this company / and tyl he discharge me of my seruyse I wille not be discharged / by that sir Tristram knewe that it was sir palomydes A sir palomydes sayd the noble knyghte sire Tristram ar ye suche a knyghte ye haue ben named wronge / For ye haue longe Page  550 [leaf 275v] ben called a gentil knyȝt / And as this daye ye haue shewed me grete vngentilnes / For ye hadde al mooste broughte me vnto my dethe / But as for yow I suppose I shold haue done wel ynough / but sir launcelot with yow was ouer moche / for I knowe no knyght lyuynge but sire launcelot is ouer good for hym and he wylle doo his vttermestt / Allas said sir Palomydes ar ye my lord sir Tristram / ye sir and that ye knowe wel ynough / by my knyghthode said Palomydes vntyl now I knewe yow not I wende that ye had ben the Kynge of Irland / for wel I wote ye bare his armes / His armes I bare said syre Tristram / and that wille I stand by / For I wanne them ones in a felde of a ful noble knyghte / his name was sir Marhaus and with grete payne I wanne that knyghte / for there was none other recouer but sir Marhaus dyed thorugh fals leches / & yet was he neuer yolden to me / Sir said Palomydes I wend ye had ben torned vpon sir Launcelots party / and that caused me to torne / ye say wel said sir Tristram/ and so I take you & I forgye yow / Soo thenne they rode in to their pauelions / and whan they were alyȝt they vnarmed them and wasshe theyre faces and handes / and soo yode vnto mete and were sette atte their table / But whanne Isoud sawe sir Palomydes she chaūged thenne her colours & for wrath she myght not speke / Anon sir Tristram aspyed her countenaunce and said Madame / for what cause make ye vs suche chere / we haue ben sore trauailed this day / Myn owne lord said la Beale Isoud for goddes sake be ye not dyspleasyd with me / for I maye none other wyse doo / for I sawe thys day how ye were bitrayed and nyghe broughte to your dethe / Truly syre I sawe euery dele how and in what wyse and therfor syr how shold I suffre in your presence suche a felon and traytour as sir Palomydes / For I sawe hym with myn eyen / how he beheld yow whan ye wente oute of the felde / for euer he houed stylle vpon his hors til he sawe yow come in ageynward / And thēne forth with al I sawe hym ryde to the hurte knyghte and chaunged harneis with hym / And thenne streyghte I sawe hym how he rode in to the felde /

¶ And anone as he had foūde yow / he encountred with yow / and thus wilfully sir Palomydes dyd bataille with yow / & as for hym sir I was not gretely aferd but I dred fore laūcelot Page  551 [leaf 276r] that knew yow not / Madame said Palomydes ye maye saye what so ye wyll / I maye not contrary yow but by my knyghthode I knewe not sir Tristram /

¶ Sir Palomydes said sir Tristram I wille take your excuse / but wel I wote ye spared me but lytel / but alle is pardonned on my party / Thenne la beale Isoud held doune her heed and said no more at that tyme /

¶ Capitulum lxxviij

ANd there with alle two knyghtes armed cam vnto the pauelione / and there they alyghte bothe / and came in armed at alle pyeces / Faire knyghtes sayd syre Tristram / ye ar to blame to come thus armed at alle pyeces vpon me whyle we ar at oure mete / yf ye wold ony thynge whan we were in the felde / there myghte ye haue easyd your hertes / Not so said the one of tho knyghtes we come not for that entent / But wete ye wel sir Tristram we be come hydder as your frendes / And I am come here said the one for to see yow & thys knyghte is come for to see la Beale Isoud / Thenne said sire Tristram I requyre yow doo of your helmes that I maye see yow / that wille we doo at your desyre the knyghtes / And whanne their helmes were of / sir Tristram thought that he shold knowe them / Thenne said sir Dynadan pryuely vnto syr Tristram / syr that is sire Launcelot du lake that spak vnto yow fyrst / and the other is my lord Kynge Arthur / Thenne said sir Tristram vnto la Beale Isoud Madame aryse for here is my lord kynge Arthur / thenne the kynge and the quene kyssed and sire launcelot and syr Tristram braced eyther other in armes / and thenne there was Ioye withoute mesure / & at the request of la Beale Isoud kynge Arthur and Launcelot were vnarmed / and thenne there was mery talkynge

¶ Madame said sire Arthur hit is many a day sythen that I haue desyred to see yow / for ye haue ben praysed soo ferre / and now I dar say ye are the fayrest that euer I sawe / & sir Tristram is as fayre and as good a knyghte as ony that I knowe / therfor me besemeth ye are wel besett to gyders / Syr god thanke yow said the noble knyȝt sire Tristram and Isoud / of your grete goodenesse & largesse ye ar pyerles / Thus Page  552 [leaf 276v] they talked of many thynges and of alle the hole Iustes / But for what cause sayd kynge Arthur were ye sir Tristram ageynst vs / ye are a knyght of the table round / of ryghte ye shold haue ben with vs / Syre said sir Tristram here is Dynadan and sire Gareth your owne neuewe caused me to be ayenst yow / My lord Arthur sayd Gareth I may wel bere the blame but it were sir Tristrams owne dedes / That may I repente sayd Dynadan / for this vnhappy sire Tristram broughte vs to haue this turnement / and many grete buffets he caused vs to haue Thenne the kynge and launcelot lough that they myghte not sytte / what knyght was that sayd Arthur that held yow soo short / this with the sheld of syluer / Syr said sir Tristram here he sytteth at this bord / what said Arthur was hit sire Palomydes / wete ye wel hit was he said la Beale Isoud /

¶ So god me help said Arthur that was vnknyghtely done of you of soo good a Knyghte / for I haue herd many peple calle you a curtois knyghte / Sir said Palomydes I knewe not sir Tristram / for he was soo desguysed / Soo god me helpe sayd launcelot it maye wel be / for I knewe not sir Tristram / But I merueyle why ye torned on oure party / That was done for the same cause said launcelot / As for that said sir Tristram I haue pardonned hym / and I wold be ryght lothe to leue his felauship / for I loue ryght wel his company / soo they lefte of and talked of other thynges / And in the euenynge kyng arthur and sir launcelot departed vnto their lodgynge / but wete ye wel sir Palomydes had enuy hertely for alle that nyght he had neuer rest in his bedde / but wayled and wepte oute of mesure / Soo on the morn sire Tristram Gareth and Dynadan arose erly / and thenne they wente vnto sire Palomydes chamber / and there they fond hym fast on slepe / for he had al nyȝt watched / And it was seene vpon his chekes that he had wept ful sore / Say no thynge said syr Tristram / for I am sure he hath taken anger and sorowe for the rebuke that I gaf to hym and la Beale Isoud

Page  553 [leaf 277r]

¶ Capitulum lxxix

THenne sir Tristram lete calle sir Palomydes / and bad hym make hym redy / for it was tyme to go to the felde whan they were redy they were armed and clothed al in reed bothe Isoud and alle they / and soo they lad her passynge fresshely thurgh the feld in to the pryory where was her lodgynge / and thenne they herd thre blastes blowe / and euery kynge and knyghte dressid hym vnto the felde / and the fyrste that was redy to Iuste was sir Palomydes and sir Kaynus le straunge a knyghte of the table round / And soo they two encountred to gyders / but sire Palomydes smote sir Kaynus soo hard that he smote hym quyte ouer his hors croupe / and forth with alle sir Palomydes smote doune another knyght and brake thenne his spere & pulled oute his swerd and did wonderly wel / And thenne the noyse beganne gretely vpon sir palomydes / loo said Kynge Arthur yonder palomydes begynneth to play his pagent / So god me help said Arthur he is a passynge good knyght / And ryght as they stood talkyng thus in came sir Tristram as thonder / and he encountred with syre Kay the Seneschall / and there he smote hym doune quyte from his hors / and with that same spere sir Tristram smote doune thre knyghtes moo / and thenne he pulled oute his swerd and dyd merueyllously / Thenne the noyse and crye chaunged from syr Palomydes and torned to sir Tristram and alle the peple cryed O Tristram O Tristram / And thenne was sir Palomydes clene forgeten / How now said Launcelot vnto Arthur / yonder rydeth a knyght that playeth his pagents / So god me help said Arthur to launcelot ye shalle see this daye that yonder two knyghtes shalle here doo this day wonders / Syr said Launcelot the one knyght wayteth vpon the other / and enforceth hym self thurgh enuy to passe the noble knyght sire Tristram / and he knoweth not of the pryuy enuy / the whiche syre Palomydes hath to hym / For all that the noble syre Tristram dothe is thorou clene knygthode / And thenne sire Gareth and Dynadan dyd wonderly grete dedes of armes as two noble knyghtes soo that Kyng Arthur spak of them grete honour &Page  554 [leaf 277v] worship / and the kynges and knyghtes of sir Tristrams syde did passyngly wel / and helde them truly to gyders / Thenne sir Arthur and sir Launceloot took their horses and dressid them and gete in to the thyckest of the prees / And there syr Tristram vnknowyng smote doune kyng Arthur / and thenne syre launcelot wold haue rescowed hym / but there were soo many vpon sir launcelot that they pulled hym doune from his hors / And thenne the kynge of Irland and the kynge of Scottes with their Knyghtes dyd their payne to take kynge Arthur/ and sir launcelot prysoner / Whanne syr Launcelot herd hem say soo he ferd as hit had ben an hongry lyon / for he ferd so that no knyghte durste nyghe hym / Thenne came sir Ector de maris and he bare a spere ageynst sire Palomydes / and brast it vpon hym alle to sheuers / And thenne syr Ector came ageyne and gaf sire Palomydes suche a dasshe with a swerd that he stouped doune vpon his sadel bowe / And forth with alle syre Ector pulled doune sir Palomydes vnder his feete / And thenne syr Ector de marys gate sir launcelot du lake an hors / and brought hit to hym / and badde hym mounte vpon hym / But sir Palomydes lepte afore and gatte the hors by the brydel / & lepte in to the sadel / Soo god me helpe said launcelot ye are better worthy to haue that hors than I / Thenne sir Ector broughte syr launcelot an other hors / gramercy sayd launcelot vnto his broder /

¶ And so when he was horsed ageyne/ with one spere he smote doune four knyghtes / And thenne sir Launcelot broughte to kynge Arthur one of the best of the iiij horses / Thenne syr launcelot with kynge Arthur and a fewe of his Knyghtes of sire Launcelots kynne dyd merueyllous dedes / for that tyme as the booke recordeth syr launcelot smote doune and pulled doune thyrtty knyghtes / Not withstandyng the other parte held them soo fast to gyders that kyng arthur and his knyghtes were ouermatched / And whanne sir Trisram sawe that what labour Kyng Arthur and his knyghtes and in especyal the noble dedes that syre launcelot dyd with his owne handes he merueylled gretely

¶ Capitulum lxxx

Page  555 [leaf 278r]

THenne sir Tristram called vnto hym syr Palomydes/ syr Gareth and syr Dynadan / and sayd thus to them my fayre felawes wete ye wel that I will torne vnto kynge Arthurs party / for I sawe neuer soo fewe men doo soo wel / and hit wille be shame vnto vs knyghtes that ben of the round table to see our lord kynge Arthur and that noble knyght sire Launcelot to be dishonoured / It wille be wel do said sire Gareth / and syr Dynadan / do your best said palomydes / for I wille not chaunge my party that I came in with al That is for my sake said sir Tristram / god spede yow in your Iourneye / and soo departed syr Palomydes fro them / Thenne sir Tristram Gareth and Dynadan torned with sir launcelot And thenne syr launcelot smote doune the kynge of Irland quyte from his hors / and so syr launcelot smote doune the kynge of Scottes and the Kynge of walys / and thenne sir arthur ranne vnto syre Palomydes and smote hym quyte from his hors / and thenne syr Tristram bare doune alle that he mett Syr Gareth and sir Dynadan dyd there as noble knyghtes/ thenne al the partyes beganne to flee / Allas said Palomydes that euer I shold see this day / for now haue I lost al the worship that I wanne / and thēne sir palomydes wente his way waylynge / and soo withdrewe hym tyl he came to a welle and there he putte his hors from hym / and dyd of his armour and wayled and wepte lyke as he had ben a wood man / Thenne many Knyghtes gaf the pryce to syre Tristram / and there were many that gaf the pryce vnto syre Launcelot /

¶ Fair lordes said sir Tristram I thanke yow of the honour ye wold yeue me / but I pray yow hertely that ye wold gyue your voys to syr launcelot / for by my feythe said syre Trystram / I wille gyue sir launcelot my voys / but syre launcelot wold not haue hit / and so the pryce was gyuen betwix them bothe / Thenne euery man rode to his lodgynge and syr bleoberis and syr Ector rode with sir Tristram and la Beale Isoud vnto her pauelions / Thenne as syr Palomydes was atte well waylynge and wepynge / there came by hym fleyng the kyng of walys and of Scotland / and they sawe syre Palomydes in that arage / Allas said they that soo noble a man as ye be/ shold be in this araye / & thenne tho kynges gat sir palomydes Page  556 [leaf 278v] hors ageyne / and made hym to arme hym and mounte vpon his hors / and soo he rode with hem makyng grete dole /

¶ Soo whan sire Palomydes came nyghe the pauelions there as syre Tristram and La beale Isoud was in / thenne sire palomydes prayd the two kynges to abyde hym there the whyle that he spake with sir Tristram / And whanne he came to the porte of the pauelions / syre palomydes said on hyghe where arte thow syr Tristram de lyones / Syr said Dynadan that is palomydes What sir Palomydes wille ye not come in here amonge vs / Fy on the traytour sayd Palomydes / for wete yow wel and hit were day lyght as it is nyght I shold slee the myn owne handes / And yf I euer maye gete the said Palomydes thou shalt dye for this dayes dede / Sir Palomydes said sir Tristram ye wyte me with wronge / for had ye done as I dyd ye hadde wonne worship / But sythen ye gyue me soo large warnynge/ I shalle be wel ware of yow / Fy on the traitour saide Palomydes / and there with departed / Thenne on the morne sir Tristram / Bleoberis and sir Ector de marys / sir Gareth / syr Dynadan what by water and what by lond they brought la beale Isoud vnto Ioyous gard / and there reposed them a vij nyghte / and made alle the myrthes and disportes that they coude deuyse / and kyng Arthur and his knyghtes drewe vnto Camelot / and syre Palomydes rode with the two kynges / And euer he made the grettest dole that ony man coude thynke for he was not alle only soo dolorous for the departyng from la beale Isoud / but he was a parte as sorouful to departe from the felauship of sir Tristram / for sire Tristram was soo kynd and soo gentyl that whanne sire Palomydes remembrid hym therof he myghte neuer be mery

¶ Capitulum lxxxj

SO at the seuen nyghtes ende / sir Bleoberys & syr Ector departed from sir Tristram and from the Quene / & these two good knyghtes had grete yeftes / and sir Gareth and sir Dynadan abode with sir Tristram / & whan sire Blebeorys and sir Ector were comen there as the Quene Gueneuer was Page  557 [leaf 279r] lodged in a castel by the see syde / And thorou the grace of god the quene was recouerd of her maladye /

¶ Thenne she asked the two knyghtes from whens they came / they sayd that they came from sir Tristram and from la beale Isoud / how doth sir Tristram said the quene and la Beale Isoud / Truly sayd tho two knyghtes he dothe as a noble knyght shold doo / and as for the Quene Isoud she is pyerles of alle ladyes / for to speke of her beaute bounte and myrthe / and of her goodenesse we sawe neuer her matche as ferre as we haue ryden and gone O mercy Ihesu said quene Gueneuer soo sayth alle the people / that haue sene her and spoken with her / God wold that I had parte of her condycyons / and it is mysfortuned me of my sekenesse whyle that turnement endured / And as I suppose / I shalle neuer see in alle my lyf suche an assemble of knyghtes and ladyes as ye haue done / Thenne the knyghtes told her hou Palomydes wanne the degree at the fyrst daye with grete noblesse / And the second day sir Trystram wanne the degree / and the thyrdde day syre launcelot wanne the degree / wel said quene Gueneuer who dyd best alle these thre dayes / Soo god me help said these knyghtes sir launcelot and sire Tristram hadde leest dishonour / And wete ye wel sir palomydes dyd passynge wel and myghtely / but he torned ageynst the party that he cam in with alle / and that caused hym to lese a grete parte of hys worship / for it semed that sir Palomydes is passyng enuyous Thenne shalle he neuer wynne worship said Quene Gueneuer for and it happeth an enuyous man ones to wynne worshyp he shalle be dishonoured twyes therfore / And for this cause alle men of worship hate an enuyous man / and wille shewe hym no fauour / And he that is curtois and kynde and gentil hath fauour in euery place /

¶ Capitulum lxxxij

NOw leue we of this mater / and speke we of sir Palomydes that rode and lodged hym with the two kynges wherof the knynges were heuy / Thenne the kynge of Irland sent a man of his to syr Palomydes and gaf hym a grete courser / and the Kynge of Scotland gaf hym grete yeftes/ Page  558 [leaf 279v] and fayne they wold haue had sire Palomydes to haue abyden with them / but in no wyse he wold abyde / and soo he departed / and rode as auentures wold guyde hym / tyl it was nyȝ none / And thenne in a forest by a welle syr Palomydes sawe where lay a fayre wounded knyght and his hors bounden by hym / and that knyght made the grettest dole that euer he herd man make / for euer he wepte and ther with he syghed as though he wold dye / Thenne syre Palomydes rode nere hym and salewed hym myldly and sayd / fayr knyghte why wayle ye soo / lete me lye doune and wayle with yow / for doubte not I am moche more heuyer than ye are / for I dare say sayd Palomydes that my sorowe is an honderd fold more than yours is and therfor lete vs complayne eyther to other / Fyrst saide the wounded knyghte I requyre yow telle me your name / for & thow be none of the noble knyghtes of the round tabble / thou shalt neuer knowe my name / what someuer come of me / Faire knyghte said Palomydes suche as I am be it better or be hit werse wete thou wel that my name is sire Palomydes sone & heyre vnto kynge Astlabor / and sir Safyr and sir Segwarydes are my two bretheren / and wete thou wel as for my self I was neuer crystened / but my two bretheren ar truly crystend O noble knyghte said that knyghte / wel is me that I haue mette with yow / and wete ye wel my name is Epynogrys the kynges sone of Northumberland / Now sytte doune sayd Epynogrys / and lete vs eyther complayne to other / Thenne syre Palomydes beganne his complaynte / Now shalle I telle yow said Palomydes what wo I endure I loue the fairest Quene and lady that euer bare lyf / and wete ye wel her name is la Beale Isoud kynge Markes wyf of Cornewaile / That is grete foly said Epynogrys for to loue Quene Isoud For one of the best knyghtes of the world loueth her / that is sir Tristram de lyones / that is trouthe said Palomydes / for no man knoweth that mater better than I doo / for I haue ben in sir Tristrams felauship this moneth and with la beale Isoud to gyders / and allas said Palomydes vnhappy man that I am now haue I loste the felauship of syre Tristram for euer & the loue of la beale Isoud for euer / and I am neuer lyke to see her more / and sir Tristram & I ben eyther to other mortal enemyes Page  559 [leaf 280r] Wel said Epynogrys / sythe that ye loued la Beale Isoud / loued she yow euer ageyne by ony thyng that ye coude thynke or wyte / or els dyd ye reioyse her euer in ony pleasyr / Nay by my knyghthode said Palomydes I neuer aspyed that euer she loued me more than alle the world / nor neuer had I plesyr with her / But the laste daye she gaf me the grettest rebuke that euer I had / the whiche shalle neuer goo from my herte / & yet I wel deserued that rebuke / for I dyd not knyghtely / & therfor I haue lost the loue of her and of sir Tristram for euer / & I haue many tymes enforced my self to doo many dedes for la beale Isoud sake / and she was the causer of my worship wynnynge / Allas said sir Palomydes now haue I lost alle the worshyp that euer I wanne / for neuer shalle me befalle suche prowesse as I had in the felauship of sir Tristram

¶ Capitulum lxxxiij

NAy nay sayde Epynogrys youre sorowe is but Iapes to my sorowe / for I reioyced my lady and wanne her with my handes / and loste her ageyn allas that daye / Thus fyrst I wanne her said Epynogrys My lady was an Erles doughter And as the Erle and two knyȝtes cam from the turnement of Loneȝep / for her sake I sette vpon this erle and on his two knyghtes my lady there beynge present / and soo by fortune there I slewe the erle and one of the knyghtes and the other knyghte fledde / and soo that nyghte I had my lady / And on the morne as she and I reposed vs atte thys welle syde / there came there to me an erraunt knyghte his name was syr Helyor le preuse an hardy knyght / and this sir Helyor chalengyd me to fyghte for my lady / And thenne we wente to bataille fyrst vpon hors and after on foote / But at the last sir Helyor wounded me soo that he lefte me for dede / and soo he toke my lady with hym / And thus my sorowe is more than yours / for I haue reioyced and ye reioyced neuer That is trouthe said Palomydes / but sythe I can neuer recouer my self I shalle promyse yow yf I can mete with sir Helynor I shalle gete yow your lady ageyne or els he shalle bete me / Thenne sire Palomydes made sir Epynogrys to take his hors Page  560 [leaf 280v] and so they rode to an hermytage / and there sir Epynogrys rested hym / And in the meane whyle syre Palomydes walkd pryuely oute to reste hym vnder the leues / and there besyde he sawe a knyghte come rydynge with a sheld that he had sene sir Ector de marys bere afore hand / and there came after hym a ten knyghtes / and soo these x knyghtes houed vnder the leues for hete / And anone after there came a knyȝt with a grene shelde / and there in a whyte lyon ledynge a lady vpon a palfroy / Thenne this knyȝt with the grene sheld that semed to be maister of the ten knyghtes he rode fyersly after sire Helyor / For it was he that hurte sir Epynogrys / And whanne he cam nyghe sir Helyor / he badde hym defende his lady / I will defende her said Helyor vnto my power / and soo they ranne to gyders soo myghtely that eyther of these knyghtes smote other doune hors and all to the erthe / and thenne they wanne vp lyghtely and drewe their swerdes and their sheldes / and lasshed to gyders myghtely more than an houre / Alle this sire Palomydes sawe and behelde but euer at the last the knyghte with sir Ectors shelde was byggar / and att the laste this knyghte smote sir Helyor doune / and thenne that knyghte vnlaced his helme to haue stryken of his hede / And thenne he cryed mercy / and praid hym to saue his lyf and badde hym take his lady /

¶ Thenne sire Palomydes dressid hym vp by cause he wyste wel that that same lady was Epynogrys lady / and he promysed hym to helpe hym / Thenne sir Palomydes wente streyghte to that lady and toke her by the hand and asked her whether she knewe a knyghte that hyghte Epynogrys / Allas she said that euer he knewe me or I hym / for I haue for his sake loste my worship / and also his lyf greueth me moost of al Not so lady said Palomydes / come on with me / for here is Epynogris in this hermytage / A wel is me said the lady and he be on lyue / whether wylt thow with that lady said the knyght with syr Ectors shelde / I will doo with her what me lyst said Palomydes / wete yow wel sayd that knyghte thou spekest ouer large / though thou semest me to haue at auauntage / by cause thow sawest me doo bataille but late / Thou wenest sir knyghte to haue that lady away from me so lyghtly / nay thynke hit neuer not / and thow were as good a knyghte as is Page  561 [leaf 281r] syr launcelot or as is sir Tristram or sir Palomydes / but thow shalt wynne her derer than euer dyd I / and soo they went vnto bataille vpon foote / and there they gaf many sadde strokes / and eyther wounded other passyng sore / / and thus they fouȝt stille more than an houre / Thenne sire Palomydes had merueil what knyghte he myghte be that was soo stronge and soo wel brethed durynge / and thus said Palomydes / knyȝt I requyre the telle me thy name / Wete thow wel said that knyghte I dar telle the my name / soo that thow wilt telle me thy name / I wille said palomydes / Truly said that knyghte / my name is Safyr sone of kynge Astlabor and sire palomydes and syre Segwarydes are my bretheren / Now and wete thou wel / my name is sir Palomydes / Thenne sir Safyr kneled doune vpon his knees and prayd hym of mercy / and thenne they vnlaced their helmes / and eyther kyssed other wepynge / And in the meane whyle sire Epynogrys aroose oute of his bedde / and herd them by the strokes / and soo he armed hym to helpe sire Palomydes yf nede were

¶ Capitulum lxxxiiij

THenne sir Palomydes tooke the lady by the hand / & broughte her to sire Epynogrys / and there was grete ioye betwixe them / for eyther swouned for Ioye / whan they were mette / Fair knyght and lady said sir Safer / it were pyte to departe yow / Ihesu send yow Ioye eyther of other / Gramercy gentyl knyghte said Epynogrys / and moche more thanke be to my lord sir Palomydes / that thus hath thurgh his prowesse made me to gete my lady /

¶ Thenne sir Epynogrys requyred sire Palomydes and sire Safere his brother to ryde with them vnto his castel for the sauf gard of his person / Sire said Palomydes we will be redy to conduyte you by cause that ye are sore wounded / and soo was Epynogrys and his lady horsed / and his lady behynde hym vpon a softe ambuler / And thenne they rode vnto his castel where they had grete chere and Ioye as grete as euer sir Palomydes and sir Safere had in their lyfe dayes / Soo on the morne sir Safere and sir palomydes departed and rode as fortune ledde them / and soo they Page  562 [leaf 281v] rode alle that daye vntyl after none / And at the last they herd a grete wepynge and a grete noyse doune in a manoir / Syre said thenne sir Safere lete vs wete what noyse this is / I wil wel said sir palomydes / and soo they rode forth tyl that they came to a fayr gate of a manoir / and there satte an old man sayenge his prayers and bedes / Thenne sire palomydes and sir Safere alyghte and lefte their horses / and wente within the gates / and there they sawe ful many goodely men wepynge /

¶ Fair syrs said palomydes wherfore wepe ye / and make this sorowe / Anone one of the knyghtes of the castel beheld sir palomydes / and knewe hym / and thēne wente to his felawes and said Fair felawes wete ye wel al / we haue in this Castel the same knyght that slewe oure lord at Loneȝep / for I knowe hym wel it is syre palomydes / Thenne they wente vnto harneis alle that myghte bere harneis / some on horsbak / and some on foote to the nombre of thre score / And whan they were redy / they came fresshly vpon syr palomydes and vpon syr Safere with a grete noyse and sayd thus / kepe the fyre palomydes . for thow arte knowen / and by ryght thow must be dede for thow hast slayne oure lord / and therfore wete ye wel / we wille slee the / therfore defende the / Thenne sir palomydes & syr Safer the one sette his bak to the other / and gaf many grete strokes / and took many grete strokes / and thus they fouȝte with a twenty knyghtes and fourty gentilmen / and yomen nyghe two houres / But at the last though they were lothe sir palomydes and syr Safere were taken and yolden and putte in a stronge pryson / and within thre dayes twelue knyghtes passed vpon them / and they fond sir palomydes gylty / and syr Safyr not gylty of their lordes dethe / And whan sir Safyr shold be delyuerd there was grete dole betwixe syr palomydes and hym / and many pyteous complayntys that sir Safyr made at his departynge / there is no maker can reherce the tenthe parte / Fair broder said palomydes lete be thy dolour and thy sorou / And yf I be ordeyned to dye a shameful dethe welcome be it / but and I had wist of this deth that I am demed vnto I shold neuer haue ben yolden / Soo syr Safere departed from his broder with the grettest dolour and sorou that euer made knyghte /

¶ And on the morne they of the castel Page  563 [leaf 282r] ordeyned twelue knyghtes to ryde with syre Palomydes vnto the fader of the same knyght that syr Palomydes slewe / and soo they bound his legges vnder an old stedes bely / And thenne they rode with syr Palomydes vnto a Castel by the see syde that hyghte Pelownes / and there syr Palomydes shold haue Iustyce / thus was their ordenaunce / and so they rode with syr palomydes fast by the Castel of Ioyous gard /

¶ And as they passed by that Castel / there came rydynge oute of that castel by them one that knewe syr palomydes / And whan that knyghte sawe sire palomydes bounden vpon a croked courser / the knyght asked syre palomydes / for what cause he was led so / A my fair felawe and knyghte sayd palomydes / I ryde toward my dethe for the sleynge of a knyght at a turnement of Loneȝep / & yf I had not departed from my lord syr Tristrā as I ouȝte not to haue done / now myȝt I haue ben sure to haue had my lyf saued / But I pray yow syr knyght recommaunde me vnto my lord sir Tristram and vnto my lady Quene Isoud / & say to them / yf euer I trespaced to them / I aske them foryeuenes / And also I biseche yow recommaunde me vnto my lord kynge Arthur and to alle the felauship of the round table vnto my power / Thenne that knyghte wepte for pyte of syr palomydes / and there with alle he rode vnto Ioyous gard as faste as his hors myghte renne / ande lyghtly that knyght descended doune of his hors and wente vnto sir Tristram / and there he told hym all as ye haue herd / and euer the knyghte wepte as he had ben madde

¶ Capitulum lxxxv

WHen sir Tristram herd how sir palomydes went to his deth / he was heuy to here that / and said how be it that I am wroth with sir palomydes / yet wil not I suffre hym to dye so shameful a deth for he is a ful noble knyȝt / & thenne anon sir Tristram was armed & toke his hors & two squyers wyth hym / & rode a grete paas towarde the castel of pelownes where sir palomydes was Iuged to deth / & these twelue knyytes that led sir palomydes passed by a welle where as sir laūcelot was whiche was alyghte there & had teyed his hors to a tree & taken of his helme to drynke of that welle / & whan he saw these Page  564 [leaf 282v] knyghtes / syr launcelot putte on his helme / and suffred them to passe by hym / And thenne was he ware of sire Palomydes bounden and ledde shamefully to his dethe / O Ihesu said launcelot What mysauenture is befalle hym that he is thus ledde toward his dethe / Forsoth said launcelot it were shame to me / to suffre this noble knyght soo to dye and I myȝte helpe hym therfor I wille helpe hym what someuer come of hit / or els I shal dye for syr Palomydes sake /

¶ And thenne sir launcelot mounted vpon his hors and gate his spere in his hand / and rode after the twelue knyghtes that ledde sir Palomydes / Fair knyghtes said sir Launcelot whyder lede ye that knyȝt/ it bysemeth hym ful ylle to ryde bounden / Thenye these twelue Knyghtes sodenly torned their horses / and said to sir launcelot / syr Knyghte we counceille the not to medle with this knyght / for he hath deserued deth / and vnto dethe he is Iuged / that me repenteth said launcelot that I may not borowe hym with fayrenesse / for he is ouer good a knyghte to dye suche a shameful dethe / And therfor fayre knyghtes said syr launcelot kepe yow as wel as ye can / for I will rescowe that knyght or dye for it / Thenne they beganne to dresse their speres / and sir launcelot smote the formest doune hors and man / and so he serued thre moo with one spere / and thenne that spere brast / and there with al sir launcelot drewe his swerd / and thenne he smote on the ryght hand and on the lyfte hand / thenne within a whyle he lefte none of tho twelue knyghtes / but he had leyd them to the erthe / and the moost party of hem were sore wounded / & thenne syr Launcelot took the best hors that he fonde and loused sire Palomydes / and sette hym vpon that hors / and so they retorned ageyne vnto Ioyous gard / & thenne was sir Palomydes ware of sir Tristram how he came rydynge / And whan sir Launcelot sawe hym / he knewe hym wel / but sir Tristram knewe not hym by cause syre Launcelot had on his sholder a golden shelde / Soo syr launcelot made hym redy to Iuste with syr Tristram / that sire Tristram sholde not wene that he were syre Launcelot / Thenne sir Palomydes cryed on lowde to syr Tristram O my lorde I requyre yow Iuste not with this knyght / for this goode knyght hath saued me from my dethe / Whan syre Tristram herde hym saye so / he came a softe trottyng Page  565 [lef 283r] paas toward them / And thenne syre Palomydes sayd / My lord syr Tristram moche am I beholdynge vnto yow of youre grete goodenes that wold profer youre noble body to rescowe me vndeserued / for I haue gretely offended yow / Not withstandynge said sire Palomydes here mette we with this noble knyghte that worshipfully and manly rescowed me from xij knyghtes / and smote them doune alle and wounded them sore

¶ Capitulum lxxxvj /

FAyre knyght said syr Tristram vnto syre Launcelot / of whens be ye / I am a knyght erraunt sayd sir laūcelot that rydeth to seke many aduentures / What is your name said sir Tristram / syre at this tyme I wille not telle yow / Thenne syre launcelot sayd vnto sir Tristram and to palomydes / now eyther of yow ar mette to gyders / I wille departe from yow / Not soo said syr Tristram I pray yow of knyȝthode to ryde with me vnto my Castel / wete yow wel said syr Launcelot I may not ryde with yow / for I haue many dedes to doo in other places / that att this tyme I maye not abyde with yow / A mercy Ihesu said syr Tristram I requyre yow/ as ye be a true knyghte to the ordre of knyghthode / playe you with me this nyghte / Thenne sire Tristram had a graunte of syre launcelot / how be it though he had not desyred hym / he wold haue ryden with hem / outher soone haue come after them for syr launcelot cam for none other cause in to that Countrey but for to see syr Tristram / And whanne they were come within Ioyous gard / they alyght / and their horses were ledde in to a stable / and thenne they vnarmed them / And whanne syre Launcelot was vnhelmed / sir Tristram and syr Palomydes knewe hym / Thenne sire Tristram took syr launcelot in armes / & soo dyd la Beale Isoud / and Palomydes kneled doune vpon his knees / and thanked syr Launcelot / whan syr launcelot sawe sir Palomydes knele / he lyghtely toke hym vp and sayd thus / wete thou wel sir Palomydes I and ony knyght in this land of worship oughte of veray ryght socoure and rescowe Page  566 [leaf 283v] soo noble a knyghte as ye are proued and renoumed thurgh oute alle this reame endlonge and ouerthwart / And thenne was there Ioye amonge them / and the oftyner that syre Palomydes sawe la Beale Isoud / the heuyer he waxed day by day Thenne sir launcelot within thre or four dayes departed / and with hym rode sir Ector de marys / and Dynadan and sir Palomydes were there lefte with sire Tristram a two monethes & more / But euer sire Palomydes faded and morned that alle men had merueylle wherfore he had faded soo aweye / So vppn a day in the daunynge sire Palomydes wente in to the foreste by hym self alone / and there he fond a welle / and thenne he loked in to the welle / and in the water he sawe his owne vysage hou he was distourbled and defaded nothyng lyke that he was What may this meane said sire Palomydes / and thus he said to hym self / A Palomydes / Palamydes / why arte thow dyffaded thou that was wonte to be called one of the fayrest knyȝtes of the world / I wille no more lede this lyf / for I loue that I maye neuer gete nor recouer / And there with all he leyd hym doune by the welle / And thenne he beganne to make a ryme of la Beale Isoud and hym /

¶ And in the meane whyle syr Tristram was that same day ryden in to the forest to chace the herte of greese / but sire Tristram wold not ryde on huntynge neuer more vnarmed by cause of syr Breuse saunce pyte / and soo as sir Tristram rode in to that forest vp and doune / he herd one synge merueyllously lowde / and that was syre Palomydes that lay by the welle / And thenne syr Tristram rode softely thyder / for he demed / there was some knyght erraunt that was at the welle

¶ And whanne sire Tristram came nyghe hym / he descended doune from his hors and teyed his hors fast tyl a tree / and thenne he came nere hym on foote / and anone he was ware where lay sire palomydes by the welle and sange lowde and meryly / and euer the complayntes were of that noble Quene La Beale Isoud / the whiche was merueyllously and wonderfully wel sayd / and ful dolefully and pytously made And alle the hole songe the noble knyghte sire Tristram herd from the begynnynge to the endynge / the whiche greued and troubled hym sore

¶ But thenne at the last whanne Page  567 [leaf 284r] sir Tristram had herd all sir Palomydes complayntes he was wrothe oute of mesure & thouȝt for to slee hym there as he lay Thenne syr Tristram remembryd hym self that sir Palomydes was vnarmed and of the noble name that sir Palomydes had and the noble name that hym self had / and thenne he made a restraynte of his anger / & so he wente vnto sire Palomydes a softe paas and said sir Palomydes I haue herd youre complaynte and of thy treason that thow hast owed me so longe And wete thou wel therfor thow shalt dye / And yf it were not for shame of knyȝthode / thow sholdest not escape my handes / for now I knowe wel thow hast awayted me with treason . Telle me said syre Tristram how thow wolt acquyte the/ Sir said Palomydes thus I wille acquyte me / as for Quene la beale Isoud ye shal wete that I loue her aboue all other ladyes in this world / and wel I wote it shalle befalle me as for her loue as befelle to the noble knyghte syre Kehydius that dyed for the loue of la Beale Isoud / and now sir Tristram I wil that ye wete that I haue loued la Beale Isoud many a day / and she hath ben the causer of my worshyp And els I had ben the moost symplest knyght in the world For by her / and by cause of her / I haue wonne the worshyp that I haue / for when I remembryd me of la Beale Isoud I wanne the worship where someuer I came for the most party / and yet had I neuer reward nor bounte of her the dayes of my lyf / and yet haue I ben her knyght gwerdonles / And therfor syr Tristram as for ony deth I drede not / for I hadde as lyef dye as to lyue / And yf I were armed as thow arte / I shold lyghtely doo batail with the / wel haue ye vttered your treason said Tristram / I haue done to yow no treason said Palomydes / for loue is free for alle men / and though I haue loued your lady / she is my lady as wel as yours / how be it I haue wronge yf ony wronge be / for ye reioyce her / and haue youre desyre of her / and soo had I neuer nor neuer am lyke to haue / and yet shalle I loue her to the vttermest dayes of my lyf as wel as ye

¶ Capitulum lxxxvij

THenne said syr Tristram I wil fyghte with yow to the vttermest / I graunte saide palomydes / for in a better Page  568 [leaf 284v] quarel kepe I neuer to fyghte / for & I dye of your handes / of a better knyghtes handes may I not be slayne / And sythen I vnderstande that I shalle neuer reioyce la beale Isoud / I haue as good wylle to dye as to lyue / Thenne sette ye a day said sir Tristram that we shalle doo bataille / this day / xv / dayes said payd Palomydes wille I mete with yow here by / in the medowe vnder Ioyous gard / Fy for shame said sire Tristram / wille ye sette soo longe day / lete vs fyghte to morn / Not soo sayd palomydes / for I am megre and haue ben longe seke for the loue of la Beale Isoud / and therfore I wille repose me tyl I haue my strengthe ageyne / Soo thenne sire Tristram and syr palomydes promysed feythfully to mete at the welle that day xv dayes / I am remembryd said sir Tristram to Palomydes / that ye brake me ones a promyse whan that I rescowed yow from Breuse saunce pyte and ix knyghtes / and thēne ye promysed me to mete me at the peron and the graue besydes Camelot / where as at that tyme ye fayled of your promyse / wete you wel said Palomydes vnto sir Tristram I was at that day in pryson so that I myghte not holde my promyse / So god me helpe said sir Tristram / and ye had holden your promyse this werk had not ben here now at this tyme / Ryghte soo departed syre Tristram and sire Palomydes / And soo sire palomydes tooke his hors and his harneis / and he rode vnto Kynge Arthurs Courte / and there syr palomydes gat hym four knyghtes and four sergeaunts of armes / and soo he retornod ageynward vnto Ioyous gard / And in the meane whyle syr Tristram chaced and hunted at alle maner of venery / and aboute thre dayes afore the bataille shold be / as syr Tristram chaced an herte ther was an Archer shot at the herte / and by mysfortune he smote syr Tristram in the thyck of the thygh / and the arowe slewe sir Tristrams hors & hurte hym / whan sir Tristram was so hurte / was passynge heuy / and wete ye wel he bled sore / and thenne he took another hors / and rode vnto Ioyous gard with grete heuynesse more for the promyse that he hadde made with sir palomydes as to doo bataille with hym wythin thre dayes after than for ony hurte of his thyȝ / wherfor ther was neyther man ne woman that coude chere hym with ony thynge that they code make to hym / neyther Quene la Beale Isoud / for euer he Page  569 [leaf 285r] demed that syr launcelot had smyten hym soo / that he shold not be able to doo bataille with hym at the day sette /

¶ Capitulum lxxxviij

BVt in no wyse there was no knyghte aboute syr Tristram that wold byleue that euer syr Palomydes wold hurte sir Tristram neyther by his owne handes nor by none other consentynge / thenne whan the fyftenth day was come sir Palomydes came to the welle with four knyȝtes with hym of Arthurs courte and thre sergeauntes of armes / And for this ententente syr palomydes broughte the knyȝtes with hym and the sergeaunt of armes / for they shold bere record of the bataille betwixe syre Tristram and syr Palomydes / And the one sergeaunt brought in his helme / the other his spere / the thyrd his swerd / Soo thus Palomydes came in to the felde / & there he abode nyghe two houres / and thenne he sente a squyer vnto syr Tristram / and desyred hym to come in to the felde / to holde his promyse / whan the squyer was come to Ioyous gard Anone as sir Tristram herd of his comynge he lete commaunde that the squyer shold come to his presence there as he lay in his bedde / My lord sir Tristram said Palomydes squyer wete yow wel my lord Palomydes abydeth yow in the felde / and he wold wete whether ye wold doo bataille or not / A my fair broder said sir Tristram wete thou wel that I am ryght heuy for these tydynges / therfor telle sire Palomydes / and I were wel atte ease I wold not lye here nor he shold haue noo nede to sende for me / and I myghte outher ryde or goo / and for thow shalt saye that I am no lyer / syre Tristram shewed hym his thye that the wounde was sixe Inches depe / and now thou hast sene my hurte / telle thy lord that this is no fayned mater and telle hym that I had leuer than all the gold of kyng Arthur that I were hole / & telle palomydes as soone as I am hole I shal seke him endlong & ouerthwart & þt promyse you as I am true knyȝt / & if euer I may mete with hym / he shal haue batail of me his fylle / & with this squyer departed / & when palomydes wist þt tristrā was hurt he was glad & said now I Page  570 [leaf 285v] am sure I shalle haue no shame / for I wote wel I shold haue had hard handelynge of hym / and by lykely I muste nedes haue had the werse / For he is the hardest knyghte in bataylle that now is lyuynge excepte sir Launcelot / And thenne departed syr Palomydes where as fortune ladde hym / & within a moneth sir Tristram was hole of his hurte / And thenne he took his hors / and rode from countray to countrey / and all straunge aduentures he acheued where someuer he rode / and alweyes he enquyred for sire Palomydes / but of alle that quarter of sommer syr Tristram coude neuer mete with sir palomydes / But thus as sir Tristram soughte and enquyred after sire Palomydes / sir Tristram encheued many grete batails where thorugh alle the noyse felle to syr Tristram / and it seaced of sir launcelot / & therfor syre launcelots bretheren and his kynnesmen wold haue slayne sire Tristram by cause of his fame/ But whanne syre launcelot wyste how his kynnesmen were sette / he said to them openly wete yow wel that and the enuy of yow alle be soo hardy to wayte vpon my lord sire Tristram with ony hurte / shame / or vylony / as I am true knyghte / I shalle slee the best of yow with myne owne handes / Allas sy for shame shold ye for his noble dedes awayte vpon hym to slee hym / Ihesu defende said launcelot that euer ony noble knyghte as syre Tristram is shold be destroyed with treason / Of this noyse and fame sprange in to Cornewaile / and amonge them of Lyonas / wherof they were passynge gladde / and made grete Ioye / And thenne they of Lyonas sente letters vnto sire Tristram of recommendacyon / and many grete yeftes to mayntene sir Tristram estate / and euer bitwene sir Tristram resorted vnto Ioyous gard where as la Beale Isoud was that loued hym as her lyf /

¶ here endeth the tenthe book whiche is of syr Tristram

¶ And here foloweth the Enleuenth book whiche is of sir launcelot

Page  571 [leaf 286r]

Book Eleven: sir Launcelot

¶ Capitulum primum

NOw leue we syr Tristram de lyones / & speke we of sire launcelot du lake and of sire Galahalt syr launcelots sone hou he was goten / and in what maner as the book of Frensshe reherceth Afore the tyme that syre Galahalt was goten or borne / there came in an hermyte vnto kynge Arthur vpon whytsonday / as the knyghtes satte at the table round / And whan the heremyte sawe the syege perillous / he asked the kyng and alle the knyghtes why that sege was voyd / Sir Arthur and alle the knyghtes ansuerd / ther shalle neuer none sytte in that syege / but one / but yf he be destroyed /

¶ Thenne sayd the hermyte wote ye what is he / nay said Arthur / and alle the Knyghtes / we wote not who is he / that shalle sytte therin / thenne wote I said the heremyte / for he that shal sytte there is vnborne and vngoten / and this same yere he shalle be goten that shalle sytte ther in that syege perillous / and he shall wynne the Sancgreal whan this hermyte had made this mensyon he departed from the courte of kynge Arthur / And thenne after this feeste syr launcelot rode on his aduenture tyl on a tyme by aduenture he past ouer the pounte of Corbyn / and there he sawe the fayrest toure that euer he sawe / and ther vnder was a fayre Towne ful of peple and alle the peple men and wymmen cryed at ones / welcome sir Launcelot du lake the floure of all knyghthode for by the alle we shalle be holpen oute of daunger / what mene ye said sire Launcelot that ye crye soo vpon me / A fayr knyght said they alle here is within thys Toure a dolorous lady that hath ben ther in paynes many wynters and dayes / for euer she boyleth in scaldynge water / & but late said alle the peple sire Gawayne was here and he myght not helpe her / and soo he lefte her in payne / Soo may I saide syr Launcelot leue her in payne as wel as sire Gawayne dyd Nay said the peple we knowe wel that it is sir Laūcelot that shalle delyuer her / wel said launcelot / thenne shewe me what I shalle doo / thenne they brought sire launcelot in to the toure And when he came to the chamber there as this lady was the dores of yron vnlocked and vnbolted / And so syr launcelot Page  572 [leaf 286v] wente in to the chambre that was as hote as ony stewe / And there syr launcelot toke the fayrest lady by the hand / that euer he sawe / and she was naked as a nedel / and by enchauntemēt Quene Morgan le fay and the Quene of Northgalys hadde put her there in that paynes by cause she was called the fairest lady of that countrey / and there she had ben fyue yeres / and neuer myghte she be delyuerd oute of her grete paynes vnto the tyme the best knyghte of the world had taken her by the hand / Thenne the peple broughte her clothes / And whanne she was arayed / syre launcelot thoughte she was the fayrest lady of the word / but yf it were Quene Gueneuer / thenne this lady said to sire Launcelot / syre yf hit please yow wille ye goo with me here by in to a chappel that we may yeue louyng and thankynge vnto god /

¶ Madame said sir launcelot cometh on with me I wille goo with yow / Soo whanne they came there and gaf thankynges to god / alle the people both lerned and lewde gaf thankynges vnto god and hym / and sayd sir knyght syn ye haue delyuerd this lady / ye shall delyuer vs from a serpent that is here in a tombe / Thenne syr launcelot tooke his shelde and said brynge me thyder / and what I may doo vnto the pleasyr of god and yow I wille doo /

¶ Soo whanne sir Laūcelot came thydder / he sawe wryten vpon the tombe letters of gold that said thus / Here shalle come a lybard of kynges blood / and he shalle slee this serpent / and this lybard shalle engendre a lyon in this foreyn countrey the whiche lyon shall passe alle other knyghtes / Soo thenne sir launcelot lyfte vp the tombe / and there came out an horryble & a fyendly dragon spyttynge fyre oute of his mouthe / Thenne sir launcelot drewe his swerd and fought with the dragon longe / and atte laste with grete payne sir launcelot slewe that dragon / There with alle came kynge Pelles the good and noble knyght / and salewed syr launcelot and he hym ageyne / Fair knyghte sayd the kynge / What is your name / I requyre you of your knyȝthode telle me

¶ Capitulum ij

SYr said launcelot wete yow wel my name is syre launcelot du lake / & my name is sayd the kyng / Pelles Page  573 [leaf 287r] kynge of the foreyn countrey / and cosyn nyghe vnto Ioseph os Armathye / And thenne eyther of them made moche of other / and soo they wente in to the Castel to take theyr repaste / and anone there came in a douue at a wyndowe / and in her mouth there semed a lytel censer of gold / And there with alle there was suche a sauour as alle the spyecery of the world had ben there / And forth with all there was vpon the table al maner of metes and drynkes that they coude thynke vpon / Soo cam in a damoysel passynge fayre and yonge / and she bare a vessel of gold betwixe her handes / and therto the kynge kneled deuoutely and said his prayers / and soo dyd alle that were there / O Ihesu said sir launcelot what maye this meane / thys is said the kynge the rychest thyng that ony man hath lyuyng And whanne this thynge goth aboute / the round table shall be broken / and wete thow wel said the kynge this is the holy Sancgreal that ye haue here sene / Soo the kynge and sir laūcelot ladde their lyf the moost parte of that daye / And fayne wold kynge Pelles haue fond the meane to haue hadde syre Launcelot to haue layne by his doughter fayre Elayne / And for this entent the kyng knewe wel that syr launcelot shold gete a chyld vpon his doughter / the whiche shold be named sir Galahalt the good knyghte / by whome alle the forayn countrey shold be broughte oute of daunger / and by hym the holy graale shold be encheued /

¶ Thenne came forth a lady that hyghte Dame Brysen / and she said vnto the Kynge / Syr wete ye wel / syre Launcelot loueth no lady in the world but all only Quene Gueneuer / and therfore wyrche ye by counceylle and I shalle make hym to lye with your doughter / & he shall not wete but that he lyeth with Quene Gueneuer / O fayre lady dame Brysen said the kyng / hope ye to brynge this about syr said she vpon payne of my lyf lete me dele / for this Brysen was one of the grettest enchauntresses that was at that tyme in the world lyuynge /

¶ Thenne anone by dame Brysens wytte she maade one to come to syr launcelot that he knewe wel / And this man brouȝt hym a rynge from Quene Gueneuer lyke as hit hadde come from her / and suche one as she was wonte for the moost parte to were / & when sir laūcelot sawe that tokē wete ye wel he was Page  574 [leaf 287v] neuer soo fayne / where is my lady said syr launcelot / in the castel of Case said the messager but fyue myle thens / Thenne sir launcelot thoughte to be there the same nyghte / And thenne this Brysen by the commaundement of kynge Pelles lete sende Elayne to this castel with xxv knyghtes vnto the castel of Case / Thenne syr launcelot ageynst nyght rode vnto that castel / and there anone he was receyued worshipfully with suche peple to his semyng as were aboute Quene Queneuer secrete Soo whanne sir Launcelot was alyghte / he asked where the Quene was / Soo dame Brysen said that she was in her bedde / & thenne the peple were auoyded / and sir launcelot was ledde vnto his chamber / And thenne dame Brysen broughte sir launcelot a cup ful of wyne / and anone as he had dronken that wyn / he was soo assoted and madde that he myghte make no delay / but withouten ony lette he wente to bedde / and he wende that mayden Elayne had ben Quene Gueneuer / wete yow wel that sir launcelot was glad and soo was that lady Elayne / that she had geten sir launcelot in her armes / For well she knewe that same nyght shold be goten vpon her Galahalt that shold preue the best knyghte of the world / and soo they lay to gyders vntyl vndorne on the morn / and alle the wyndowes and holes of that chamber were stopped that no man ere of day myghte be sene / And thenne sire launcelot remembryd hym / and he arose vp and wente to the wyndowe /

¶ Capitulum Tercium

ANd anone as he had vnshet the wyndowe the enchaūtement was gone / thēne he knewe hym self that he had done amys / Allas he sayd that I haue lyued so long now I am shamed / Soo thenne he gat his swerd in his hand and said thow traitresse what arte thow that I haue layn by alle this nyghte / thow shalt dye ryghte here of my handes / Thenne this fayr lady Elaye skypped oute of her bedde al naked and kneled doune afore sir launcelot / and sayd Fair curteis knyghte comen of kynges blood / I requyre yow haue mercy vpon me /

¶ And as thow arte renoumed the moost noble Page  575 [leaf 288r] knyghte of the world / slee me not / for I haue in my wombe hym by the / that shal be the moost noblest knyȝte of the world A fals traitresse said syr launcelot why hast thow bytrayed me / anone telle me what thow arte / Syr she said I am Elayn the doughter of Kynge pelles / wel said sire Launcelot I wyl forgyue yow this dede / and there with he took her vp in his armes / and kyssed her / for she was as fayr a lady and there to lusty and yonge and as wyse as ony was that tyme lyuyng So god me helpe said sir launcelot I may not wyte thys to yow / but her that made this enchauntement vpon me as bytwene yow and me / and I may fynde her that same lady Brysen she shalle lese her hede for wytchecraftes / for there was neuer knyghte deceyued soo as I am this nyghte / And soo syre Launcelot arayed hym / and armed hym / and toke his leue myldely at that lady yonge Elayne / and soo he departed / Thenne she said my lord sir launcelot I biseche yow see me as soone as ye may / for I haue obeyed me vnto the prophecy that my fader teld me / And by his commaūdement to fulfille this prophecy I haue gyuen the grettest rychesse and the fayrest floure that euer I had / and that is my maydenhode that I shalle neuer haue ageyne / and therfore gentyl knyȝt owe me youre good wille / And soo syr launcelot arayed hym and was armed / and toke his leue myldely at that yonge lady Elayne / & soo he departed / and rode tyl he came to the Castel of Corbyn/ where her fader was / and as fast as her tyme came she was delyuerd of a fayr chylde / and they crystened hym Galahalt / & wete ye wel that child was wel kepte and wel nourisshed / & he was named Galahalt by cause syr Launcelot was so named at the fontayne stone / And after that the lady of the lake confermed hym sir Launcelot du lake / Thenne after this lady was delyuerd and chirched / there came a knyghte vnto her / his name was sire Bromel la pleche / the whiche was a grete lord and he hadde loued that lady longe / and he euermore desyred her to wedde her / and soo by no meane she coude putte hym of / Tyl on a day she said to syr Bromel / wete thow wel sir knyȝt I wille not loue yow / for my loue is set vpon the best knyȝt of the world / Who is he said syr Bromel . syr she said it is syre Launcelot du lake that I loue and none other / and therfore Page  576 [leaf 288v] wowe me no lenger / ye saye wel said sir Bromel / And sythen ye haue told me soo moche / ye shalle haue but lytel Ioye of sir launcelot / for I shal slee hym where someuer I mete hym / sire said the lady Elayne / doo to hym no treason / wete ye wel my lady said Bromel / and I promyse yow this twelue moneth I shalle kepe the pounte of Corbyn for syr launcelots sake / that he shalle neyther come ne goo vnto yow / but I shall mete with hym /

¶ Capitulum Quartum

THenne as hit felle by fortune and aduenture sire Bors de ganys that was neuewe vnto sir Launcelot cam ouer that brydge / and ther syre Bromel and sire bors Iusted / & sir Bors smote syre Bromel suche a buffet that he bare hym ouer his hors croupe / And thenne syre Bromel as an hardy knyghte pulled out his suerd / and dressid his sheld to doo bataille with syr Bors / And thenne syr Bors alyȝte / and auoyded his hors / and there they dasshed to gyders many sadde strokes / and long thus they foughte / tyl att the laste syr Bromel was leyd to the erthe / and there syre bors began to vnlace his helme to slee hym / Thenne syr bromel cryed syre bors mercy / and yelded hym / vpon this couenaunt thou shalt haue thy lyf said syr bors / soo thou goo vnto syr launcelot vpon whytsondaye that next cometh and yelde the vnto hym as knyghte recreaunt / I wille doo hit said syr bromel / and that he sware vpon the crosse of the swerd / and soo he lete hym departe / and syr bors rode vnto kynge Pelles / that was within Corbyn / And whanne the kynge and Elayne his doughter wist that syr bors was neuewe vnto syr launcelot / they made hym grete chere / Thenne said dame Elayne / we merueyle where sir Launcelot is / for he came neuer here but ones / Meruelle not said sir bors / for this half yere he hath ben in pryson with quene Morgan le fay kyng Arthurs syster / Allas said dame Elayne that me repenteth / and euer syr bors beheld that child in her armes / and euer hym semed it was passynge lyke sire launcelot / Truly said Elayne wete ye wel this child he gat vpon me / Thēne sir bors wepte for Ioye / & he praid to god it myȝt Page  577 [leaf 289r] preue as good a knyghte as his fader was / And soo cam in a whyte douue / and she bare a lytel censer of gold in her mouthe / and there was alle maner of metes and drynkes / and a mayden bare that Sancgreal / and she said openly / wete yow wel syr Bors that this child is Galahalt that shalle sytte in the sege peryllous and encheue the Sancgreal / and he shalle be moche better than euer was sir Launcelot du lake / that is his owne fader / & thenne they kneled doune / & made theyre deuocyons / and there was suche a sauour as alle the spyecery in the world had ben there / And whanne the douue took her flyghte / the mayden vanysshed with the Sancgreal as she cam Syr said sir Bors vnto kynge Pelles / this Castel may be named the castel aduenturous / for here be many straunge aduentures / that is sothe said the kynge / for wel maye this place be called the aduentures place / for there come but fewe knyghtes here that gone aweye with ony worship / be he neuer so strong here he may be preued / and but late sire Gawayne the good knyght gate but lytyl worship here / for I lete yow wete said kynge Pelles / here shalle no knyght wynne no worship / but if he be of worship hym self and of good lyuynge / and that loueth god and dredeth god / and els he geteth no worshyp here be he neuer soo hardy / that is wonderful thyng said syr Bors what ye meane in this Countrey / I wote not / for ye haue many straunge aduentures / and therfor I wyl lye in this Castel this nyghte / ye shalle not doo so said kynge Pelles by my counceyll / for hit is hard and ye escape withoute a shame / I shalle take the aduenture that wille befalle me said syr Bors thenne I counceyle yow said the kynge to be confessid clene/ As for that said sire Bors I wille be shryuen with a good wylle / Soo syr Bors was confessyd / and for al wymmen sir Bors was a vyrgyne / sauf for one / that was the doughter of kynge Brangorys / and on her he gat a child that hyghte Elayne / and sauf for her syre Bors was a clene mayden / and soo sir Bors was ledde vnto bed in a fayr large chamber / and many dores were shette aboute the chamber / whan sir Bors aspyed alle tho dores / he auoyded alle the peple / for he myght haue no body with hym / but in no wyse syr Bors wold vnarme hym / but soo he leid hym doune vpon the bedde / and ryght soo Page  578 [leaf 289v] he sawe come in a lyghte that he myght wel see a spere grete & longe that came streyghte vpon hym poyntelynge / and to syre Bors semed that the hede of the spere brente lyke a tapre / and anon or syr Bors wyst / the spere hede smote hym in to the sholder an hand brede in depnesse / and that wound greued syre Bors passynge sore / And thenne he leyd hym doune ageyne for payne / and anone there with alle there came a knyght armed with his shelde on his sholder and his suerd in his hande and he bad sir Bors aryse syr knyȝte and fyghte with me / I am sore hurte he said / but yet I shal not fayle the / And thenne syr Bors starte vp and dressid his shelde / and thenne they lasshed to gyders myghtely a grete whyle / and at the laste syr Bors bare hym bakward vntyl that he came vnto a chāber dore / and there that knyghte yede in to that chamber & rested hym a grete whyle / And whan he hadde reposed hym he came out fresshely ageyne / and beganne newe bataille with sir bors myghtely and strongly

¶ Capitulum Quintum

THenne sir Bors thought he shold no more goo in to that chamber to reste hym / and soo syr Bors dressyd hym betwixe the knyghte and that chamber dore / and there sir Bors smote hym doune / and thenne that knyght yelded hym What is your name said syr Bors / Syr said he / my name is pedyuere of the streyte marches / Soo syre Bors made hym to swere at whytsonday next comyng to be atte court of kyng arthur / and yelde hym there as a prysoner as an ouercome knyghte by the handes of syr Bors / Soo thus departed syr pedyuere of the strayte marches / And thenne syre Bors layd hym doune to reste / and thenne he herd and felt moche noyse in that chamber / and thenne sir Bors aspyed that there came in / he wist not whether at the dores nor wyndowes shot of arowes and of quarels soo thyck that he merueylled / and many felle vpon hym and hurte hym in the bare places / And thenne syre Bors was ware where came in an hydous lyon / soo sire bors dressid hym vnto the lyon / & anone the lyon berafte hym his sheld & with his suerd syr bors smote of the lyons heed / Page  579 [leaf 290r] Ryght soo syre Bors forth with all sawe a dragon in the courte passynge horryble / and there semed letters of gold wryten in his forhede / and sir Bors thoughte that the letters made a sygnyfycacyon of kynge Arthur / Ryghte soo there came an horryble lybard and an old / and there they foughte longe / & dyd grete batail to gyders / And at the laste the dragon spytte oute of his mouthe as hit had ben an honderd dragons / and lyghtely alle the smal dragons slewe the old dragon and tare hym all to pyeces / Anone with alle there came an old man in to the halle / and he satte hym doune in a fayre chayre / and there semed to be two edders aboute his neck / and thenne the old man had an harp / and there he sange an old songe how Ioseph of Armathye came in to this land / thenne whanne he had songen / the old man bad sir Bors go from thens / for here shall ye haue no mo aduentures / and ful worshypfully haue ye done / and better shalle ye doo here after / And thenne sir Bors semed that there came the whytest douue with a lytel golden senser in her mouthe / And anone there with alle the tēpest ceased and passed that afore was merueyllous to here / Soo was alle that Courte ful of good sauours / Thenne syre Bors sawe four children berynge four fayre tapres / and an old man in the myddes of the children with a senser in hys owne hand / and a spere in his other hand / and that spere was called the spere of vengeaunce

¶ Capitulum Sextum

NOw said that old man to sire Bors goo ye to your cosyn syr Launcelot / and telle hym of this aduenture the whiche had ben most conuenyent for hym of al erthely knyȝtes / but synne is soo foule in hym / he may not encheue suche holy dedes / for had not ben his synne he had past al the knyȝtes that euer were in his dayes / and telle thou sir launcelot of alle wordly aduentures he passeth in manhode & prowesse al other But in this spyrytuel mater he shalle haue many his better/ And thenne sir Bors sawe four gentylwymen come by hym pourely bisene / & he sawe where that they entrid in to a chamber where as grete lyȝte as it were a somer lyghte / & the wymen Page  580 [leaf 290v] kneled doune afore an aulter of syluer with foure pyllowes and as hit had ben a bisshop kneled doune afore that table of syluer / And as sire Bors loked ouer his hede / he sawe a swerd lyke syluer naked houynge ouer his hede / and the clerenes there of smote soo in his eyen that as att that tyme syre Bors was blynde / and there he herd a voys that said go hens thou syre Bors / for as yet thow arte not worthy for to be in this place / and thenne he yede backward to his bedde tyl on the morne / And on the morne kynge Pelles made grete Ioye of sir Bors / and thenne he departed and rode to Camelot / and there he fonde sire launcelot du lake / and told hym of the aduentures that he had sene with kynge Pelles at Corbyn / Soo the noyse sprange in Arthurs Courte that launcelot had geten a childe vpon Elayne the doughter of Kynge Pelles / wherfor Quene Gueneuer was wrothe / and gafe many rebukes to sir launcelot / and called hym fals knyghte / & thenne sire laūcelot told the quene all / & how he was made to lye by her by enchaūtement in lykenes of the Quene / Soo the quene helde sir laūcelot excused / And as the book saith kyng Arthur had ben in Fraunce / and had made warre vpon the myghty kyng Claudas / and had wonne moche of his landes / And whanne the kyng was come ageyne / he lete crye a grete feest that al lordes & ladyes of al Englond shold he there / but yf it were suche as were rebellious ageynst hym

¶ Capitulum vij

ANd when dame Elayne the doughter of kyng Pelles herd of this feeste / she wente to her fader and requyred hym that he wold gyue her leue to ryde to that feest / The kyng ansuerd I will wel ye go thyder / but in ony wyse as ye loue me / and wile haue my blessyng that ye be wel bisene in the rychest wyse / and loke that ye spare not for no cost / aske and ye shalle haue alle that yow nedeth / Thenne by the aduyse of dame Brysen her mayden alle thynge was apparaylled vnto the purpose that there was neuer no lady more rychelyer bysene / So she rode with xx knyȝtes & x ladyes & gētilwymen to þePage  581 [leaf 291r] nombre of an honderd horses / And whanne she came to Camelot / kynge Arthur and quene Gueneuer sayd and all the knyghtes / that dame Elayne was the fayrest and the best bysene lady that euer was sene in that Courte

¶ And anone as kynge Arthur wyste that she was come / he mette her / and salewed her / and soo dyd the moost party of al the knyghtes of the round table / bothe syr Tristram / sir Bleoberys and syr Gawayne and many moo that I wille not reherce / But whanne syre Launcelot sawe her he was soo ashamed / & that by cause he drewe his swerd on the morne whan he had layne by her / that he wold not salewe her nor speke to her / & yet syre Launcelot thought she was the fayrest woman that euer he sawe in his lyf dayes / But whanne dame Elayn sawe syre Launcelot that wold not speke vnto her / she was so heuy that she wend her herte wold haue to brast / For wete you wel oute of mesure she loued hym / And thenne Elayne sayd vnto her woman dame Brysen the vnkyndenesse of syr Launcelot sleeth me nere /

¶ A pees madame said dame Brysen I wille vndertake that this nyghte he shalle lye with yow / and ye wold hold yow stylle / that were me leuer sayd dame Elayne than alle the gold that is aboue the erthe / Lete me dele said dame Brysen /

¶ Soo whanne Elayne was broughte vnto quene Gueneuer eyther made other good chere by countenaunce but nothynge with hertes / But alle men & wymmen spake of the beaute of dame Elayne and of her grete Rychesses / thenne at nyghte the quene commaunded that dame Elayne shold slepe in a chamber / nyghe her chamber and alle vnder one roofe / & soo it was done as the quene commaunded

¶ Thenne the quene sent sor syre Launcelot & badde hym come to her chamber that nyghte / or els I am sure said the Quene / that ye will go to your ladyes bed dame Elayn / by whome ye gat Galahalt / A madame said syr Launcelot neuer saye ye so For that I dyd was ageynste my wille / thenne said the quene loke that ye come to me whan I send for yow / Madame said launcelot I shall not fayle yow but I shall be redy at your commaundemēt / this bargayn was soone done & made bitwene them / but dame Brysen knewe it by her craftes / & told hit to her lady dame Elayne /

¶ Allas said she how shall I Page  582 [leaf 291v] doo / lete me dele said dame Brysen / for I shalle brynge hym by the hand euen to your bedde / and he shalle wene that I am Quene Gueneuers messager

¶ Now wel is me said dame Elayne / for alle the world I loue not soo moche as I doo syr launcelot /

¶ Capitulum viij

SOo whanne tyme came that alle folkes were a bedde / Dame Brysen came to syr launcelots beddes syde and said Syre launcelot du lake slepe yow / My lady quene gweneuer lyeth and awayteth vpon yow / O my fayre lady sayd syr launcelot I am redy to goo with yow where ye will haue me / Soo syr launcelot threwe vpon hym a long gowne / and his suerd in his hand / and thenne dame Brysen took hym by the fynger and ledde hym to her ladyes bedde dame Elayne / And thenne she departed and lefte them in bedde to gyders / wete yow wel the lady was gladde and soo was syr launcelot / for he wende that he had had another in his armes /

¶ Now leue we them kyssynge and clyppynge as was kyndely thyng / & now speke we of quene gueneuer that sente one of her wymen vnto syr launcelots bed /

¶ And whan she came there / she fond the bedde colde / and he was away / soo she came to the Quene and told her alle / Allas said the Quene where is that fals knyghte become / Thenne the quene was nyghe oute of her wytte / and thenne she wrythed and weltred as a mad woman / and myght not slepe a four or fyue houres /

¶ Thenne syre launcelot had a condycion that he vsed of customme he wolde clater in his slepe / and speke ofte of his lady Quene Gueneuer / Soo as syr launcelot had waked as longe as hit had pleasyd hym / thenne by course of kynde he slepte / & dame Elayne bothe / And in slepe he talked and clatered as a Iay of the loue that had ben betwixe Quene Gweneuer and hym /

¶ And soo as he talke soo lowde the Quene herde hym there as she laye in her chamber / & when she herde hym soo clater she was nyghe woode and out of her mynde / and for anger and payne wist not what to do /

¶ And Page  583 [leaf 292r] thenne she coughed soo lowde that syre launcelot awaked and he knewe her hemynge /

¶ And thenne he knewe well that he lay not by the Quene / and there with he lepte out of his bed as he had ben a wood man in his sherte / and the quene mett hym in the floore / and thus she said / fals traytour knyȝt that thow arte / loke thow neuer abyde in my Courte and auoyde my chamber / and not soo hardy thow fals traytour knyȝt that thow arte that euer thow come in my syghte / Allas sayd syr launcelot / and there with he tooke suche an hertely sorowe atte her wordes that he felle doune to the floore in a swoune / And there with alle Quene Gueneuer departed / And whanne syr Launcelot awoke of his swoune / he lepte oute at a bay wyndowe in to a gardyne / and there with thornes he was alle to cratched in his vysage and his body / and soo he ranne forthe he wyst not whyder / and was wylde wood as euer was man and soo he ranne two yere / and neuer man myghte haue grace to knowe hym

¶ Capitulum Nonum

NOw torne we vnto Quene Gueneuer and to the fayr lady Elayne that whanne dame Elayn herd the quene soo to rebuke syr launcelot / and also she sawe how he swouned / and hou he lepte oute at a bay wyndowe / Thenne she said vnto quene Gueneuer Madame ye are gretely to blame for syr launcelot / for now haue ye lost hym / for I sawe & herd by his countenaunce that he is mad sor euer / Allas madame ye doo grete synne / and to your self grete dishonour / for ye haue a lord of your owne / and therfor it is youre parte to loue hym / for there is no quene in this world / hath suche an other kynge as ye haue / And yf ye were not myghte haue the loue of my lord syr Launcelot / and cause I haue to loue hym / for he had my maydenhode / and by hym I haue borne a fayre sone / and his name is Galahalt / and he shalle be in his tyme the best knyghte of the world /

¶ Dame Elayne said the Quene whanne hit is daye lyght I charge yow and commaunde yow to auoyde my Courte Page  584 [leaf 292v] And for the loue ye owe vnto sire launcelot discouer not his counceylle / for and ye doo / it wille be his dethe / As for that said dame Elayne I dar vndertake he is marred for euer / and that haue ye made / for ye nor I are lyke to reioyce hym / for he made the moost pytous grones whanne he lepte oute at yonder bay wyndowe that euer I herd man make / Allas sayd fayre Elayne / and allas said the Quene Gueneuer / for now I wote wel / we haue loste hym for euer / So on the morne dame Elayne took her leue to departe and she wold no lenger abyde / Thenne kynge Arthur brought her on her waye with mo than an honderd knyghtes thurgh a forest /

¶ And by the way she told sir Bors de ganys alle how hit betyd that same nyghte And how sir launcelot lepte out att a wyndowe araged oute of his wytte / Allas said syr Bors where is my lord sir launcelot become / Syr said Elayne I wote nere / Allas said syre bors betwixe yow bothe ye haue destroyed that good knyghte / As for me said dame Elayne I sayd neuer nor dyd neuer thynge that shold in ony wyse displease hym / but with the rebuke that Quene Gueneuer gaf hym I sawe hym swoune to the erthe / And whanne he woke he took his swerd in his hand naked sauf his sherte / and lepte oute at a wyndowe with the grysylyest grone that euer I herd man make

¶ Now fare wel dame Elayne saide syre Bors / and hold my lord Arthur with a tale as long as ye can / for I wylle torne ageyne to Quene Gueneuer / and gyue her a hete / and I requyre yow as euer ye wylle haue my seruyse make good watche and aspye yf euer ye may see my lord sire Launcelot

¶ Truly sayd fayr Elayne I shalle doo alle that I may do for as fayne wold I knowe and wete where he is become as yow or ony of his kynne / or Quene Gueneuer / and cause grete ynough haue I therto as wel as ony other / And wete ye wel said fayre Elayne to sire Bors / I wold lese my lyf for hym / rather than he shold be hurte / but allas I cast me neuer for to see hym / and the chyef causer of this is dame Gueneuer

¶ Madame said dame Brysen the whiche had made the enchauntement before betwix sir launcelot and her / I pray you hertely lete syre Bors departe / and hye hym with al his myȝt Page  585 [leaf 293r] as fast as he may to seke syre Launcelot / For I warne yow he is clene out of his mynde / and yet he shall be wel holpen / & but my myracle / Thenne wepte dame Elayne / and soo dyd syre Bors de ganys / and soo they departed / and syre bors rode streyghte vnto Quene Gueneuer / and whanne she sawe sir Bors / she wepte as she were wood / Fy on your wepyng said sir Bors de ganys / for ye wepe neuer but whan there is no bote / Allas said sir Bors that euer syr launcelot kynne sawe yow / for now haue ye lost the best knyght of oure blood / and he that was alle oure leder and oure socour / and I dare saye and make it good that all kynges crysten nor hethen may not fynde suche a knyghte for to speke of his nobylnesse and curtosye with his beaute and his gentylnesse / Allas said sire Bors what shalle we doo that ben of his blood / Allas sayd Ector de marys / Allas said Lyonel

¶ Capitulum x

ANd whanne the Quene herd them saye soo / she felle to the erthe in a dede swoune / and thenne syr Bors took her vp / and dawed her / & whanne she was awaked she kneled afore the thre knyghtes / and helde vp bothe their handes and besoughte them to seke hym / and spare not for noo goodes but that he be founden / for I wote he is oute of his mynde / & sir Bors / syr Ector / and syr Lyonel departed from the quene for they myght not abyde no lenger for sorowe / and thenne the quene sent them tresour ynough for theyr expencys / and so they took their horses and their armour and departed / and thenne they rode from countrey to countrey in forestes and in wyldernes and in wastes / and euer they laid watche bothe att forestes and at alle maner of men as they rode to herken and spere after hym / as he that was a naked man in his sherte with a swerd in his hand /

¶ And thus they rode nyghe a quarter of a yere endlonge and ouerthwarte in many places forestes and wildernes / and oftymes were euylle lodged for his sake / and yett for alle theire laboure and sekynge coude they neuer here word of hym /

¶ And wete yow well Page  586 [leaf 293v] these thre knyghtes were passynge sory / Thenne at the laste sire Bors and his felawes mette with a knyghte that hyght syr Melyon de Tartare / Now fayre knyȝt said sir Bors / whether be ye awey / for they knewe eyther other afore tyme / Sir said Melyon I am in the way toward the courte of kyng Arthur Thenne we praye yow sayd sire Bors that ye wille telle my lord Arthur and my lady quene Gueneuer and alle the felaushyp of the roūd table that we can not in no wyse here telle where syr launcelot is become /

¶ Thenne sire Melyon departed from them / and sayd that he wold telle the kynge and the quene and alle the felaushyp of the round table as they had desyred hym / Soo whanne sire Melyon came to the Courte of kynge Arthur / he told the kynge and the quene and al the felauship of the round table what sir Bors had said of syre Launcelot / Thenne sire Gawayne sire Vwayne / syr Sagramor le desyrus / syr Aglouale / and syre Percyuale de galys tooke vpon them by the grete desyre of kynge Arthur / and in especial by the quene to seke thorou out all Englond walys & Scotland to fynde sire Launcelot / and with hem rode eyghten knyghtes moo to bere them felauship / and wete ye wel / they lacked no maner of spendyng / and soo were they thre and twenty knyghtes /

¶ Now torne we to syre Launcelot / and speke we of his care and woo / and what payne he there endured / for cold / honger and thurste he had plente /

¶ And thus as these noble knyghtes rode to gyders / they by one assente departed / & thenne they rode by two / by thre / and by foure / and by fyue / & euer they assigned where they shold mete / And soo sir Aglouale and syr Percyuale rode to gyders vnto theyr moder that was a quene in tho dayes / And whanne she sawe her two sones / for Ioye she wepte tendyrly / And thenne she sayd / A my dere sones / whanne your fader was slayne / he lefte me iiij sones / of the whiche now be tweyn slayne / And for the dethe of my noble sone syre Lamorak shalle my herte neuer be gladde / And thenne she kneled doune vpon her knees to fore Aglouale and sir Percyuale / and besoughte them to abyde at home with her / A swete moder said syr Percyuale we may not / For we be come kynges blood of bothe partyes / and therfor moder it is our kynde to haunte armes and noble dedes / Allas Page  587 [leaf 294r] my swete sones thenne she sayd . for your sakes I shalle lese my lykynge and lust / and thenne wynde and weder I maye not endure / what for the dethe of your fader kynge Pellenore that was shamefully slayne by the handes of syr Gawayne / and his broder syre Gaherys / and they slewe hym not manly but by treason / A my dere sones this is a pyteous complaynte for me of your faders dethe / consyderynge also the dethe of sire Lamorak that of knyȝthode had but fewe felawes / Now my dere sones haue this is your mynde / Thenne there was but wepynge and sobbynge in the Courte whanne they shold departe / and she felle in swounynge in myddes of the Courte /

¶ Capitulum xj

ANd whanne she was awaked / she sente a squyer after them with spendynge ynough / And soo whane the squyer had ouertake them / they wold not suffre hym to ryde with hem / but sente hym home ageyne to comforte theyr moder / prayenge her mekely of her blessynge / And so this squyer was benyghted / and by mysfortune he happend to come to a castel where dwellid a Baroune /

¶ And so whanne the squyer was come in to the castel / the lord asked hym / from whens he came / and whome he serued / my lord sayd the squyer a serue a good knyghte that is called sire Aglouale / the squyer said it to good entente / wenynge vnto hym to haue ben more forborne for syre Aglouals sake / than he had said he had serued the quene Aglouals moder / wel my felawe said the lord of that Castel / for syre Aglouals sake thow shalt haue euyl lodgynge / for sir Aglouale slewe my brodr / and therfor thow shalt dye on party of payement /

¶ And thenne that lord commaunded his men to haue hym aweye and slee hym / and soo they dyd / and soo pulled hym oute of the castel / and there they slewe hym without mercy /

¶ Ryghte so on the morne came sire Aglouale and sire Percyuale rydynge by a chirche where men and wymmen were besy / and beheld the dede squyer / and they thoughte to berye hym / what is there said sir Aglouale / that ye behold soo fast / A good man starte forthe / Page  588 [leaf 294v] and said / fayre knyghte here lyeth a squyer slayne shamefully this nyght / How was he slayne fayr felawe said sir Aglouale / my fayr syr said the man / the lord of this castel lodged this squyer this nyght / and by cause he said he was seruaunt vnto a good knyghte that is with kynge Arthur / his name is syr Aglouale / therfor the lord commaunded to slee hym / & for this cause is he slayne / Gramercy said syr Aglouale / and ye shalle see his dethe reuenged lyghtely / for I am that same knyght for whome this squyer was slayne / Thenne sir Aglouale called vnto hym syr Percyuale / and badde hym alyghte lyghtely / and soo they alyghte bothe / and betoke theire horses to their men / and soo they yede on foote in to the Castel / And also soone as they were within the castel gate / syre Aglouale badde the porter goo thow vnto thy lord and telle hym / that I am syr Aglouale for whome this squyer was slayne this nyȝt Anone the porter told this to his lord whos name was Godewyn / anone he armed hym / and thenne he came in to the court and said whiche of yow is sir Aglouale / here I am said Aglouale / for what cause slewest thow this nyghte my moders squyer / I slewe hym said syr Goodewyn by cause of the / For thow slewest my broder syr Gawdelyn / As for thy broder sayd syr Aglouale I auowe hit / I slewe hym / for he was a fals knyghte and a bitrayer of ladyes and of good knyghtes / & for the dethe of my squyer thow shalt dye / I defye the said sir Goodewyn / thenne they lasshed to gyders as egerly as hit had ben two lyons / and syr Percyuale he fought with alle the remenaunt that wold fyghte / And within a whyle syr Percyuale had slayne alle that wold withstande hym / For syr percyuale delt soo his strokes that were soo rude that there durste no man abyde hym / And within a whyle sir Aglouale had sir Goodewyn at the erthe / and there he vnlaced his helme / & strake of his hede / and thenne they departed and took theyre horses / and thenne they lete cary the dede squyer vnto a pryory / and there they entered hym /

¶ Capitulum xij

ANd whanne this was done / they rode in to many countreyes euer enquyryng after syr Launcelot / but neuer Page  589 [leaf 295r] they coude here of hym / and at the laste they came to a Castell that hyghte Cardycan / and there syre Percyuale and sire aglouale were lodged to gyders / and pryuely aboute mydnyȝt sir Percyuale came to aglouals squyer / and sayd aryse & make the redy / for ye and I wylle ryde awey secretely / Sir said the squyer / I wold ful fayne ryde with yow where ye wold haue me / but and my lord your broder take me / he wille slee me / as for that care thow not / for shalle be thy waraunt / & soo syr Percyual rode tyl it was after none / and thenne he came vpon a brydge of stone / and there he fond a knyght that was bounden with a chayne faste aboute the wast vnto a pyller of stone / O fayre knyghte said that bounden Knyghte / I requyre the lose me of my boundes / what knyghte are ye sayd syr Percyuale / and for what cause are ye soo bounden / Syre I shalle telle yow said that knyght I am a knyȝte of the table round / and my name is syre Persydes / and thus by aduentur I came this waye / and here I lodged in this castel atte brydge foote / and therin duelleth an vncurtois lady / and by cause she profered me to be her peramour / and I refused her / she sette her men vpon me sodenly or euer I myghte come to my wepen and thus they bonde me / and here I wote wel I shal dye but yf somme man of worship breke my bandes / Be ye of good chere said syr Percyuale / and by cause ye are a knyghte of the round table as wel as I / I trust to god to breke youre bandes / and there with syr Percyuale pulled out his swerd and strake at the chayne with suche a myght that he cutte a two the chayne / and thoru syr Percydes hauberk and hurte hym a lytel / O Ihesu said sir Persides that was a myghty stroke as euer I felt one / for had not the chayne be / ye hadde slayn me / & there with al sire Persydes sawe a knyghte comyng oute of a Castel al that euer he myghte flynge / Beware syr saide syre Percydes yonder cometh a man that wille haue adoo with you Lete hym come said syre Percyuale / and so he mette with that knyghte in myddes of the brydge / and sire percyuale gaf hym suche a buffet that he smote hym quyte from his hors / & ouer a parte of the brydge that had not ben a lytil vessel vnder the brydge / that knyghte had ben drouned / and thēne sire percyual tooke the knyghtes hors and made sire percydes to mounte vp Page  590 [leaf 295v] hym / and soo they rode vnto the castel / and bad the lady delyuer syre Persydes seruaunts / or els he wold slee alle that euer he fonde / and soo for fere she delyuerd them alle / Thenne was syre Percyuale ware of a lady that stode in that toure / A madame sayd syre Percyuale what vse and customme is that in a lady to destroye good knyghtes / but yf they wylle be your peramour / for sothe this is a shameful customme of a lady / And yf I had not a grete mater in my hand / I shold fordoo your euylle custommes / and soo syr Percydes brouȝte syr percyuale vnto his owne castel / and there he made hym grete chere alle that nyghte / And on the morne whanne syr percyuale had herd masse / and broken his fast / he badde syr persydes ryde vnto kynge Arthur / and telle the kynge how that ye mette with me / and telle my broder syre Aglouale how I rescowed yow / and bydde hym seke not after me / for I am in the quest to seke sir launcelot du lake / And though he seke me he shalle not fynde me / and telle hym I wille neuer see hym nor the courte tyl I haue fond syre Launcelot / Also telle sir kay the Seneschal and to syr Mordred that I trust to Ihesu to be of as grete worthynes as eyther of them / for telle them I shal neuer forgete theire mockes and scornes that they did to me that day that I was made knyghte / And telle them I will neuer see the Courte tyl men speke more worship of me than euer men dyd of ony of them bothe / And soo syre percydes departed from syr percyuale / and thenne he rode vnto kyng Arthur / and told there of sire percyuale / And whan sire Aglouale herd hym speke of his broder syr percyuale / he sayd / he departed from me vnkyndely /

¶ Capitulum xiij

SYr sayd syre percydes on my lyf he shalle preue a noble knyghte as ony now is lyuynge / And whanne he sawe sire kay and syr Mordred / syr percydes said thus / My fayre lordes bothe syr percyuale greteth yow wel bothe / and he sente you word by me that he trusteth to god or euer he come to the courte ageyne to be of as grete noblesse as euer were ye bothe and mo men to speke of his noblesse than euer they did Page  591 [leaf 296r] yow / hit maye wel be sayd syr kay and syre Mordred / but at that tyme whanne he was made knyghte / he was ful vnlyke to preue a good knyght / As for that sayd kynge Arthur / he must nedes preue a good knyghte / for his fader and his bretheren were noble knyghtes / And now wille we tourne vnto syr Percyuale that rode longe / and in a forest he mette a knyghte with a broken shelde and a broken helme / and as soone as eyther sawe other redyly they made them redy to Iuste / and soo hurteled to gyders with alle the myghte of theyr horses / & they to gyders soo hard that syre Percyuale was smyten to the erthe / and thenne syr Percyuale arose lyghtely / and caste his shelde on his sholder and drewe his swerd / and badde the other knyghte alyghte and doo we bataille vnto the vttermest Wylle ye more sayd that knyghte / and there with he alyghte/ and putte his hors fro hym / and thenne they came to gyders an esy paas / and there they lasshed to gyder with noble suerdes / and somtyme they stroke / and somtyme they foyned / and eyther gaf other many grete woundes / Thus they fought nere half a daye / and neuer rested but ryghte lytel / and there was none of them both that had lasse woundes than xv / and they bledde soo moche that it was merueyl they stode on their feete/ But this knyghte that foughte with syre Percyuale was a proued knyghte and a wyse fyghtynge knyghte / and syre percyuale was yonge and stronge not knowyng in fyghtyng as the other was / Thenne sir percyuale spake fyrste and sayd syre knyghte hold thy hand a whyle stille / for we haue fouȝten for a symple mater and quarel ouer longe / and therfor I requyre the telle me thy name / for I was neuer or this tyme matched / Soo god me help sayd that knyghte / and neuer or this tyme was there neuer knyght that wounded me soo sore/ as thow hast done / and yet haue I foughten in many batails and now shalt thow wete that I am a knyghte of the table round / and my name is syr Ector de marys broder vnto the good knyghte syr launcelot du lake / Allas said syr percyual and my name is syre percyuale de galys that hath maade my quest to seke syr launcelot / and now I am seker that I shall neuer fynysshe my quest / for ye haue slayne me with your handes / It is not soo said sire Ector / for I am slayne by youre Page  592 [leaf 296v] handes / and maye n lyuote / therfor I requyre yow sayd sire Ector vnto syr Percyuale ryde ye here by to a pryory / & brynge me a preest that I may receyue my saueour / for I may not lyue / And whanne ye come to the courte of Kynge Arthur / telle not my broder sire launcelot how that ye slewe me / For thenne he wold be your mortal enemy / But ye may say that I was slayne in my quest as I soughte hym / Allas said sire Percyuale ye saye that thynge that neuer wille be / for I am soo faynte for bledynge that maye vnnethe stande / how shold I thenne take my hors /

¶ Capitulum xiiij

THenne they made bothe grete dole oute of mesure / this wille not auayle said sire Percyuale / And thenne he kneled doune and made his prayer deuoutely vnto al myghty Ihesu / for he was one of the best knyghtes of the world that at that tyme was / in whome the veray feythe stode moost in

¶ Ryght soo there came by / the holy vessel of the Sancgreal with alle maner of swetnes and sauour / but they coude not redyly see who that bare that vessel / but syre Percyuale hadde a glemerynge of the vessel and of the mayden that bare hit / for he was a parfyte clene mayden / and forth with al they bothe were as hole of hyde and lymme as euer they were in theire lyf dayes / thenne they gaf thankynges to god with grete myldenesse / O Ihesu said syr Percyuale what maye this meane / that we be thus heled / and ryghte now we were at the poynt of dyenge / I wote ful wel said sire Ector what it is / It is an holy vessel that is borne by a mayden / and therin is parte of the hooly blood of oure lord Ihesu crist blessid mote he be but it may not be sene said syr Ector / but yf hit be by a parfyte man / Soo god me help said syr Percyuale I sawe a damoysel as me thoughte alle in whyte with a vessel in both her handes / and forth with al I was hole / Soo thenne they toke their horses and their harneis and amended theire harneis as wel as they myghte that was broken / and soo they mounted vpon theyr horses / and rode talkynge to gyders / And there sir Ector de marys told sire Percyuale how he hadde foughte his Page  593 [leaf 297r] broder syr launcelot longe / and neuer coude here wetynge of hym / in many straunge aduentures haue I ben in this queste And soo eyther told other of their aduentures /

¶ Here endeth the enleuenth booke /

¶ And here foloweth the twelfth boook¶ Capitulum primum /

ANd now leue we of a whyle of syr Ector and of syre Percyuale / and speke we of sir launcelot that suffred and endured many sharp shoures that euer ranne wylde wood from place to place and lyued by fruyt / and suche as he myght gete / and dranke water two yere / and other clothyng had he but lytel / but his sherte and his breche /

¶ Thus as sir laūcelot wandred here and there / he came in a fayre medowe where he fond a pauelione / and there by vpon a tree there henge a whyte shelde / and two swerdes henge there by and two speres lened there by a tree /

¶ And whanne syr launcelot sawe the swerdes / anone he lepte to the one swerd and tooke hit in his hand and drewe hit oute / And thenne he lasshed at the sheld that alle the medowe range of the dyntes / that he gaf suche a noyse as ten knyghtes had foughten to gyders / Thenne came forthe a dwerf and lepte vnto syr launcelot / and wold haue had the suerd oute of his hand / and thenne syre launcelot took hym by the bothe sholders and threwe hym to the ground vpon his neck that he had al moost broken his neck / and there with alle the dwerf cryed helpe / Thenne came forth a lykely knyghte and wel apparaylled in scarlet furred with myneuer / And anone as he sawe syr launcelot / he demed that he shold be oute of his wytte / And thenne he said with fayre speche good man leye doune that swerd / for as me semeth / thow haddest more nede of slepe and of warme clothes / than to welde that swerd / As for that said syr Launcelot come not to nyȝ for and thow doo wete thou wel I will slee the / And when Page  594 [leaf 297v] the knyghte of the pauelione sawe that he starte bakward within the pauelione / And thenne the dwerf armed hym lyghtely and soo the knyghte thought by force and myghte to take the swerd from syr launcelot / and soo he came steppynge oute / and whanne syr launcelot sawe hym come so alle armed with hys swerd in his hand / Thenne sire launcelot flewe to hym with suche a myghte and hytte hym vpon the helme suche a buffet / that the stroke troubled his braynes / and there with the suerd brak in thre / And the knyght felle to the erthe as he hadde ben dede / the blood brastynge oute of his mouthe / the nose / and the eres / And thenne syr launcelot ranne in to the pauelione and rasshed euen in to the warme bedde / and there was a lady in that bedde / and she gat her smock / and ranne oute of the pauelione / And whanne she sawe her lord lye at the ground lyke to be dede / thenne she cryed and wepte as she had ben madde / Thenne with her noyse the knyghte awaked oute of his swoun and loked vp wekely with his eyen / and thenne he asked her where was that madde man that had gyuen hym suche a buffet / for suche a buffet had I neuer of mans hand / Sir sayd the dwerf it is not worship to hurte hym for he is a man oute of his wytte / and doubte ye not he hath ben a man of grete worship / and for somme hertely sorow that he hath taken he is fallen madde / and me besemeth said the dwerfe he resembleth moche vnto sir Launcelot / for hym I sawe at the grete turnement besyde Loneȝep / Ihesu defende said that knyghte that euer that noble knyght syre Launcelot shold be in suche a plyte / but what someuer he be said that knyghte / harme wille I none doo hym / and this knyghtes name was Blyaunt / Thenne he said vnto dwerf / goo thow fast on horsbak vnto my broder syr Selyuaunt / that is at the Castel blank / & telle hym of myn aduenture / and bydde hym brynge with hym an hors lytter / and thenne wille we bere this knyghte vnto my Castel /

¶ Capitulum ij

SOo the dwerf rode fast / and he came ageyne / and broughte syr Selyuaunt with hym / and syxe men with Page  595 [leaf 298r] an hors lytter / and soo they took vp the fether bedde with syre launcelot / and soo caryed alle awey with hem vnto the Castel Blank / and he neuer awaked tyl he was within the Castel / And thenne they bounde his handes & his feet / and gafe hym good metes and good drynkes / and broughte hym ageyne to his strengthe and his fayrenesse / but in his wytte they coude not brynge hym ageyn / nor to knowe hym self / Thus was syr launcelot there more than a yere and a half honestly arayed and fayre farne with alle / Thenne vpon a day this Lord of that Castel syr Blyaunt took his armes on horsbak with a spere to seke aduentures / And as he rode in a forest ther met hym two knyghtes aduenturous / the one was Breuse saunce pyte / and his broder syr Bertelot / & these two ranne both attones vpon syr Blyaunt / and brake their speres vpon his body And thenne they drewe oute swerdes & made grete bataill / & fought long to gyders / But at the last syr Blyaunt was sore wounded / and felte hym self faynte / and thenne he fled on horsbak toward his castel / And as they cam hurlyng vnder the Castel where as sir launcelot lay in wyndowe / & sawe how two knyghtes layd vpon syr Blyaunt with their swerdes / And whanne sir launcelot sawe that yet as woode as he was he was sory for his lord syr Blyaunt / And thenne sir launcelot brake the chaynes fro his legges and of his armes / & in the brekyng he hurte his handes sore / & so sir launcelot ran out at a posterne / and there he mett with the two knyȝtes that chaced sir Blyaunt / & there he pulled doun sir Bertelot with his bare handes from his hors / & there with all he wrothe hys suerd out of his hand / & so he lepte vnto syr Bruse / & gaf hym suche a buffet vpon the hede that he tumbled bakward ouer his hors croupe / And whan sir Bertolet sawe there his broder haue suche a falle / he gat a spere in his hand / & wold haue ronne syr launcelot thurgh / that sawe sir Blyaunt / and strake of the hand of syr Bertelot / And thenne syr bruse and sir bertelot gat theyr horses and fled away / whan syre Selyuaunt came and sawe what syr launcelot had done for his brother / thenne he thanked god and so dyd his broder that euer they dyd hym ony good

¶ But whanne sire blyaunt sawe that syr launcelot was hurte with the brekyng Page  596 [leaf 298v] of his yrons / thēne was he heuy that euer bound hym / bynde hym no more said syr Selyuaunt / for he is happy & gracyous Thenne they made grete Ioye of syr launcelot / and they bound hym no more / & soo he abode there an half yere and more / and on the morne erly syr launcelot was ware where came a grete bore with many houndes nyghe hym / But the bore was so byg ther myghte no houndes tere hym / and the hunters came after blowyng their hornes bothe vpon horsbak & some vpon foote / & thenne sir launcelot was ware where one alyght and teyed his hors to a tree . and lened his spere ageynste the tree /

¶ Capitulum iij

SOo came syr launcelot and fonde the hors bounden tyl a tree / & a spere lenyng ageynst a tree / & a swerd teyed to the sadel bowe / & thenne sir launcelot lepte in to the sadel & gat that spere in his hand / & thenne he rode after the bore / & thenne syre laūcelot was ware where the bore set his ars to a tree by an hermytage / Thenne sir launcelot ranne atte bore with his spere / & ther with the bore torned hym nemly / & rafe out the longes & the hert of the hors so that launcelot felle to the erthe / & or euer sire launcelot myȝt gete from the hors / the bore rafe hym on the brawne of the thyȝ vp to the houghbone / and thenne sir launcelot was wrothe / & vp he gat vpon his feet / & drewe his swerd / & he smote of the bores hede at one stroke / & there with all came out the heremyte / & sawe hym haue suche a wound / thenne the heremyte came to sir launcelot and bemoned hym / and wold haue had hym home vnto his hermytage / but whan syr launcelot herd hym speke / he was so wroth with his wound that he ranne vpon the heremyte to haue slayne hym / & the heremyte ranne awey / & whan sir laūcelot myght not ouer gete hym / he threwe his swerd after hym / for syr launcelot myght tho no ferther for bledyng / thēne the heremyte torned ageyn / & asked sir launcelot how he was hurte / Felawe said sir launcelot this bore hath bete me sore / Thenne come with me said the heremyte and I shalle hele yow / Goo thy wey said sir launcelot and dele not with me / Thenne the heremyte ranne his way / and there he mette with a good knyghte Page  597 [leaf 299r] with many men / Sir said the heremyte / here is fast by my place the goodlyest man that euer I sawe / and he is sore wounded with a bore / & yet he hath slayne the bore / But wel I wote sayd the heremyte and he be not holpen that goodly man shall dye of that wounde / and that were grete pyte / Thenne that knyghte atte desyre of the heremyte gat a carte / and in that carte that knyghte putte the bore and sir launcelot / for sir laūcelot was soo feble that they myghte ryght easyly deale wyth hym / and soo syr launcelot was broughte vnto the hermytage and there the heremyte heled hym of his wound / But the heremyte myghte not fynde syr launcelots sustenaunce / and so he enpayred and waxed feble bothe of his body and of his wyt for the defaute of his sustenaunce / he waxed more wooder than he was afore hand / And thenne vpon a day syr launcelot ran his waye in to the forest / and by aduenture he came to the cyte of Corbyn where dame Elayne was that bare Galahalt syr Launcelots sone / and soo whan he was entryd in to the toun he ranne thurgh the Towne to the Castel / and thenne alle the yonge men of that Cyte ranne after sir Launcelot / and there they threwe turues at hym / and gaf hym many sadde strokes/ And euer as syre launcelot myghte ouer retche ony of them/ he threwe them soo that they wold neuer come in his handes no more / for of some he brake the legges & the armes / & so fledde in to the Castel / and thenne came oute knyghtes and squyers and rescowed syr launcelot / And whan they beheld hym / & loked vpon his person / they thought they sawe neuer so goodly a man / And whan they sawe so many woundes vpon hym alle they demed that he had ben a man of worship / And thenne they ordeyned hym clothes to his body / and strawe vndernethe hym / and a lytel hous / And thēne euery day they wold throwe hym mete / and sette hym drynke / but there was but fewe wold brynge hym mete to his handes

¶ Capitulum iiij

SO it befelle that kynge Pelles had a neuewe / his name was Castor / and so he desyred of the kyng to be made knyghte / & so atte request of this Castor the kynge Page  598 [leaf 299v] made hym knyghte at the feest of Candelmasse / And whanne syr Castor was made knyghte / that same day he gaf many gownes / And thenne sir Castor sente for the foole that was syr Launcelot / And when he was come afore syr Castor / he gaf sir Launcelot a Robe of scarlet and alle that longed vnto hym / And whanne syr launcelot was soo arayed lyke a knyghte he was the semelyest man in alle the Courte / and none so wel made / Soo whanne he sawe his tyme / he went in to the gardyn And there syre launcelot leid hym doune by a welle & slepte And soo at after none dame Elayne and her maydens came in to the gardyn to playe them / and as they romed vp & doun one of dame Elayns maydens aspyed where laye a goodely man by the welle slepynge / and anone shewed hym to dame Elayne / Pees said dame Elayne / and saye no word / & thenne she broughte dame Elayne where he laye / And whan that she beheld hym / anone she felle in remembraunce of hym / and knewe hym veryly for syr launcelot / and there with alle she felle on wepyng soo hertely / that she sanke euen to the erthe / & whanne she had thus wepte a grete whyle / thenne she aroos & called her maydens and said she was seke / And so she yede out of the gardyn / & she wente streyghte to her fader / & there she toke hym a parte by her self / and thenne she said O fader now haue I nede of your help / and but yf that ye helpe me / fare wel my good dayes for euer / What is that doughter said kyng Pelles / Sir she said thus is it in your gardyn / I went for to sporte / and there by the welle I fonde syr Launcelot du lake slepyng / I may not bileue that said kyng Pelles / syre she said truly he is there / & me semeth he shold be distracte oute of his witte / thenne hold yow stille said the kyng & lete me dele Thenne the kyng called to hym suche as he most trusted a / iiij / persons & dame Elayn his douȝter / and whan they cam to the welle and beheld syr launcelot / anone dame Brysen knewe hym / Sire saide dame Brysen we muste be wyse how we dele with hym / for this knyghte is oute of his mynde / & yf we awake hym rudely / what he wil doo we al knowe not / But ye shal abyde / and I shalle throwe suche an enchauntement vpon hym / that he shal not awake within the space of an houre / & so she dyd

¶ Thenne within a lytel whyle after the Page  599 [leaf 300r] kyng commaunded that all peple shold auoyde that none shold be in that way there as the kyng wold come / & soo whan this was done / these four men and these ladyes layd hand on syr launcelot / and soo they bare hym in to a Toure / and soo in to a chamber where was the holy vessel of the Sancgreal / and by force syr launcelot was leid by that holy vessel / and there came an holy man and vnhylled that vessel / and soo by myracle and by vertu of that holy vessel syr launcelot was heled and recouerd / And whanne that he was awaked / he groned and syghed and complayned gretely / that he was passynge sore

¶ Capitulum v

ANd whanne sir launcelot sawe kynge Pelles & Elayne / he waxed ashamed and said thus / O lord Ihesu how came I here / for goddes sake my lord lete me wete how that I came here / Sir said dame Elayne in to thys Countrey ye cam lyke a madde man clene oute of your wytte And here haue ye ben kepte as a foole / and no creature here knewe what ye were vntyl by fortune a mayden of myn broughte me vnto yow where as ye lay slepynge by a welle / and anone as I veryly beheld yow / I knewe yow / And thenne I told my fader / and so were ye broughte asore this holy vessel And by the vertu of it thus were ye helyd / O Ihesu mercy said sire launcelot yf this be sothe / how many there be that knowen of my woodenes / Soo god me help sayd Elayne no mo but my fader and I and dame Brysen / Now for Crystes loue said sir Launcelot kepe hit in counceylle / and lete noo man knowe hit in the world / for I am sore ashamed that I haue ben thus myscaryed / for I am bannysshed oute of the Countrey of Logrys for euer that is to for to saye the countrey of Englond/ And soo syr Launcelot lay more than a fourtenyghte or euer that he myghte stere for sorenes / And thenne vpon a day he sayd vnto dame Elayne these wordes / lady Elayne for your sake I haue had moche trauaill care and anguysshe / it nedeth not to reherse hit / ye knowe how / Not withstandyng I knowe wel I haue done foule to yow whan that I drewe my swerd to you to haue slayn you vpon the morn whan I had layn with yow And alle was the cause that ye & dame Brysen made me for Page  600 [leaf 300v] to lye by yow maulgre myn hede / and as ye saye that nyghte Galahalt your sone was begoten / that is trouthe sayd dame Elayne /

¶ Now wille ye for my loue said sire launcelot goo vnto your fader and gete me a place of hym wherin I maye dwelle / For in the Courte of kynge Arthur maye I neuer come / Syr said dame Elayne I will lyue and dye with yow / and only for your sake / and yf my lyf myghte not auaile you and my dethe myghte auaile yow / wete you wel I wold dye for your sake / and I wille go to my fader / and I am sure/ there is no thynge that I can desyre of hym but I shalle haue hit / And where ye be my lord syr Launcelot doubte ye not but I wille be with yow with alle the seruyse that I may do Soo forth with alle she wente to her fader / and said syre / my lord syr launcelot desyreth to be here by yow in some Castel of yours / wel doughter said the kynge sythe hit his desyre to abyde in these marches he shalle be in the Castel of Blyaunt / and there shalle ye be with hym and twenty of the fayrest ladyes that ben in this countrey / and they shalle alle be of the grete blood / and ye shalle haue ten knyghtes with yow / For doughter I wille that ye wete we alle ben honoured by the blood of sire launcelot

¶ Capitulum vj

THenne wente dame Elayne vnto syr Launcelot & told hym alle how her fader had deuysed for hym and her/ Thenne cam the knyȝt syr Castor that was neuewe vnto kyng Pelles vnto syr launcelot & asked hym what was his name Sir said syr launcelot my name is le cheualer malfet that is to say the knyȝt that hath trespaced / Sir said sir Castor it may wel be so / but euer me semeth your name shold be syr laūcelot du lake / for or now I haue sene yow / sir said launcelot ye are not as a gentyl knyȝt / I put caas my name were syr laūcelot/ & that it lyste me not to discouer my name / what shold it greue you here to kepe my counceyl / & ye not hurte ther by / but wete thou wel & euer it lye in my power I shal greue yow & that I promyse you truly / Thenne sir Castor kneled doune and besouȝt sir laūcelot of mercy / for I shal neuer vtter what ye be whyle ye be in these partyes / thenne sire launcelot pardonned hym /

¶ And thenne after this kynge Pelles with Page  601 [leaf 301r] x knyghtes / and dame Elayne / and twenty ladyes rode vnto the Castel of Blyaunt that stood in an Iland beclosed in yron with a fayr water depe and large /

¶ And whanne they were there / syr launcelot lete calle hit the Ioyous yle / & there was he called none other wyse / but Le cheualer malfet the knyghte that hath trespaced / Thenne sire Launcelot lete make hym a shelde alle of Sabel / and a quene crowned in the myddes alle of syluer / & a knyghte clene armed knelyng afore her and euery day ones for ony myrthes that alle the ladyes myȝt make hym / he wold ones euery day loke toward the realme of Logrys / where kynge Arthur and Quene Gueneuer was And thenne wold he falle vpon a wepyng as his hert shold to braste / Soo hit felle that tyme syr launcelot herd of a Iustynge fast by his Castel within thre leghes thenne he called vnto hym a dwerf and he badde hym goo vnto that Iustynge / and or euer the knyghtes departe loke thow make there a crye in herynge of alle knyghtes / that there is one knyghte in the Ioyous yle that is the Castel of Blyaunt / and saye his name is le cheualer malfet that wille Iuste ageynste knyghtes that wille come / And who that putteth that knyghte to the werse / shalle haue a fayr mayde and a Ierfaucon /

Capitulum Septimum /

SOo whanne this crye was made / vnto Ioyous yle drewe knyghtes to the nomber of fyue honderd / and wete ye wel there was neuer sene in Arthurs dayes one knyght that dyd soo moche dedes of armes as syre launcelot dyd thre dayes to gyders / For as the booke maketh truly mencyon / he had the better of all the fyue honderd knyghtes / and ther was not one slayne of them / And after that syr launcelot maade them alle a grete feest / and in the meane whyle came syr Percyual de galys & syr Ector de marys vnder that Castel / that was called the Ioyous yle / And as they beheld that gay castel / they wold haue gone to that Castel / but they myghte not for the brode water / and brydge coude they fynde none / Thenne they sawe on the other syde a lady with a sperhauk on her hād Page  602 [leaf 301v] and sir Percyual called vnto her / and asked that lady who was in that Castel / Fair knyghtes she said / here within thys castel is the fayrest lady in this land / and her name is Elayne / Also we haue in this Castel the fayrest knyghte and the myghtyest man that is I dar saye lyuynge / and he called hym self le cheualer mal fett / how came he in to these marches sayd syr Percyuale / Truly said the damoysel / he came in to this countrey lyke a madde man with dogges and boyes chacyng hym thorou the Cyte of Corbyn / and by the holy vessel of the Sanke greal he was broughte in to his wytte ageyne / but he wil not doo batail with noo knyghte / but by vndorne or by none/ And yf ye lyste to come in to the castel sayd the lady ye muste ryde vnto the ferther syde of the castel / and there shalle ye fynde a vessel that wille bere yow and your hors / Thenne they departed / and came vnto the vessel / And thenne syre Percyual alyghte / and sayd to sire Ector de marys / ye shalle abyde me here vntyl that I wete what maner a knyghte he is / For it were shame vnto vs in as moche as he is but one knyghte / & we shold both doo batail with hym / doo ye as ye lyste said sire Ector / and here I shalle abyde yow vntyl that I here of yow Thenne passed sire Percyuale the water / And whanne he cam to the Castel gate / he bad the porter goo thow to the good knyghte within the Castel / and telle hym / here is comen an erraūt knyghte to Iuste with hym / Sir said the porter ryde ye within the Castel / and there is a comyn place for Iustynge that lordes and ladyes maye behold yow / So anone as syr launcelot had warnynge / he was soone redy / and there syr Percyual and sir launcelot encountred with suche a myghte / and theire speres were soo rude that both the horses and the knyghtes felle to the erthe / Thenne they auoyded their horses / and flange oute noble swerdes / & hewe awey cantels of theire sheldes / & hurtled to gyder with their sheldes lyke two bores / and eyther wounded other passynge sore / At the last syr Percyual spake fyrst whanne they had foughten there more than two houres / Fair knyghte said syre Percyuale I requyre the telle me thy name for I mette neuer with suche a knyghte / Sir said syr launcelot my name is le cheueler mal fet / Now telle me youre name saide syre Launcelot I requyre yow gentyl knyghte Page  603 [leaf 302r] Truly said sire Percyual my name is syr Percyual de galis that was broder vnto the good knyghte syre Lamorak de galys / and kynge Pellenore was oure fader / and syre Agloual is my broder / Allas said sire launcelot what haue I done to fyghte with yow that art a knyghte of the table round / that somtyme was your felawe

¶ Capitulum viij

ANd there with alle syre launcelot kneled doune vpon his knees and threwe awey his sheld and his suerd from hym / Whanne sire Percyual sawe hym doo so / he merueyled what he mened / And thenne thus he said / syre knyghte what someuer thow be / I requyre the vpon the hyghe ordre of knyghthode telle me thy true name / Thenne he said so god me help my name is syre launcelot du lake kynge Bans sone of Benoy / Allas said syr Percyual what haue I done I was sente by the Quene for to seke yow / and soo I haue soughte yow nygh this two yere / and yonder is syre Ector de marys your broder abydeth me on the other syde of the yonder water/ Now for goddes sake said sire Percyual forgyue me myn offencys that I haue here done / hit is soone forgyuen said syre launcelot / Thenne syre Percyual sente for svr Ector de marys And whanne syr launcelot had a syghte of hym / he ranne vnto hym and took hym in his armes / and thēne syr Ector kneled doune / and eyther wepte vpon other that all had pyte to beholde them / Thenne came dame Elayne / and she there maade them grete chere as myghte lye in her power / and there she told syr Ector and syr Percyual how and in what manere sir launcelot came in to that countrey / And how he was heled / and there hit was knowen how longe syr launcelot was with syre Blyaunt and with syr Selyuaunt / and how he fyrste mette with them / and how he departed from them by cause of a bore / and how the heremyte heled syre launcelot of his grete woūd and how that he came to Corbyn /

¶ Capitulum ix

Page  604 [leav 302v]

NOw leue we sire launcelot in the Ioyous yle with the lady dame Elayne and syr Percyual and sir Ector playenge with hem / and torne we to syr Bors de ganys and sire Lyonel that had soughte sire launcelot nygh by the space of two yere / and neuer coude they here of hym / & as they thus rode / by aduenture they cam to the hous of Brandegore / and there syr Bors was wel knowen / for he had geten a child vpon the kynges doughter fyten yere to forne / & his name was Helyn le blank / And whanne syre Bors sawe that child hit lyked hym passynge wel / And so tho knyghtes had good chere of the kynge Brandegore /

¶ And on the morne syre Bors came afore kynge Brandegore and said Here is my sone Helyn le blanck / that as it is sayd he is my sone / and sythe hit is soo / I wille that ye wete that I wil haue hym with me vnto the Courte of kynge Arthur / Sir sayd the kynge / ye maye wel take hym with you / but he is ouer tender of age / As for that sayd syre Bors I wille haue hym with me / and brynge hym to the hows of most worship of the world / Soo whanne syre Bors shold departe / there was made grete sorowe for the departynge of Helyn le blanck / and grete wepynge was there made / But sire Bors and syre Lyonel departed / And within a whyle they came to Camelot / where was kynge Arthur / And whanne kynge Arthur vnderstood that Helyn le blank was kynge Bors sone / and neuewe vnto kynge Brandegore / Thenne kynge Arthur lete hym make knyghte of the round table / and soo he preued a good knyght / and an aduenturous /

¶ Now wille we torne to our mater of sire launcelot / Hit befelle vpon a day syr Ector and syr Percyual cam to syr Launcelot and asked hym what he wold doo / and whether he wold goo with them vnto kynge Arthur or not / Nay sayd syr Laūcelot that may not be by no meane / for I was so venetreted at the Courte that I cast me neuer to come there more / Sir said syr Ector I am youre broder and ye are the man in the world that I loue moost / And yf I vnderstode that it were your disworship / ye may vnderstande I neuer counceyle yow ther to / but kynge Arthur and al his knyghtes / and in especial Quene Gueneuer maade suche dole and sorowe that hit was merueyle to here and see Page  605 [leaf 303r] And ye muste remembre the grete worship and renoume that ye be of / how that ye haue ben more spoken of than ony other knyghte that is now lyuynge / for there is none that bereth the name now but ye and syr Tristram / therfore broder sayd syre Ector make yow redy to ryde to the Courte with vs / and I dar say / there was neuer knyghte better welcome to the court than ye / and I wote wel and can make it good said syr Ector it hath coste my lady Quene twenty thowsand pound the sekynge of yow / wel broder said sire launcelot I wil doo after your counceil and ryde with yow / Soo thenne they took their horses and made them redy and took their leue at kyng Pelles and at dame Elayne / And whanne syre launcelot shold departe / dame Elayne made grete sorowe / My lord syr Launcelot said dame Elayne at this same feest of Pentecost shall your sone and myn Galahalt be made knyghte / for he is fully now xv wynter old / doo as ye lyst said sir Launcelot / god gyue hym grace to preue a good knyghte / As for that sayd dame Elayne I doubte not he shal preue the best man of his kyn excepte one / thenne shalle he be a man good ynough said syre launcelot /

¶ Capitulum x

THenne they departed / and within fyue dayes Iourney they came to Camelot / that is called in Englyssh wynchester / And whanne syre launcelot was come among them / the kynge and all the knyghtes made grete Ioye of hym And there syre Percyual de galys and sire Ector de marys beganne and told the hole aduentures that syre launcelot had ben oute of his mynde the tyme of his absence / and how he called hym self le cheueler malefet / the knyȝt that had trespaced And in thre dayes sir launcelot smote doun fyue honderd knyghtes / And euer as sire Ector and sire Percyual told these tales of syre launcelot quene Gueneuer wepte as she shold haue dyed / Thenne the quene made grete chere / O Ihesu sayd kynge Arthur I merueyle for what cause ye syre launcelot wente out of your mynde / I and many other deme it was for the loue of fayre Elayne the doughter of kynge Pelles / by Page  606 [leaf 303v] whome ye ar noysed that ye haue goten a child / & his name is Galahalt / and men saye / he shalle doo merueylles / My lord sayd syr launcelot yf I dyd ony foly / I haue that I fouȝt and there with alle the kynge spak no more / But all sire launcelots kynne knewe for whome he wente oute of his mynde/ And thenne there were grete feestes made and grete Ioye / & many grete lordes and ladyes whanne they herd that sir launcelot was come to the Courte ageyne they made grete ioye

¶ Capitulum xj

NOw wille we leue of this mater and speke we of sire Tristram / and of syr Palomydes that was the Sarasyn vncrystened / whanne syr Tristram was come home vnto Ioyous gard from his aduentures / Alle this whyle that syr launcelot was thus myst two yere and more / syre Tristram bare the renomme thurgh alle the realme of Logrys and many straunge aduentures befelle hym and ful wel and manly and worshipfully he broughte hem to an ende /

¶ So whanne he was come home la Beale Isoud told hym of the grete feest that shold be at Pentecost next folowyng / and there she told hym how sir launcelot had ben myst two yere / and al that whyle he had ben oute of his mynde / and how he was holpen by the holy vessel the Sancgreal / Allas said syr Tristram that caused some debate betwixe hym and Quene Gueneuer / Syr said dame Isoud I knowe hit all / for quene Gweneuer sente me a letter in the whiche she wrote me alle how hit was for to requyre yow to seke hym / and now blessid be god said la Beale Isoud he is hole and sound and come ageyne to the Courte / therof am I glad said syr Tristram and now shal ye and I make vs redy / for both ye and I wille be atte feest Sir said Isoud and hit please yow I wille not be there / for thorugh me ye be marked of many good knyghtes / and that caused yow to haue moche more labour for my sake than nedeth yow / Thenne wille I not be there said syr Tristram / but yf ye be there / god defende said la beale Isoud / for thenne shal I be spoken of shame amonge alle Quenes and ladyes Page  607 [leaf 304r] of estate / for ye that ar called one of the noblest knyghtes of the world / and ye a knyghte of the round table / how maye ye be myst at that feest / what shalle be said amonge all knyghtes See how sire Tristram hunteth and hawketh & coureth within a Castel with his lady / and forsaketh your worshyp / Allas shalle some say hit is pyte that euer he was made knyght or that euer he shold haue the loue of a lady / Also what shal Quenes and ladyes saye of me / hit is pyte that I haue my lyf that I wille holde soo noble a knyghte as ye ar from his worship / Soo god me help said syre Tristram vnto la Beale Isoud / hit is passynge wel sayd of yow and nobly counceyled / and now I well vnderstande that ye loue me / and lyke as ye haue counceyled me I wille doo a parte there after / But there shalle no man nor childe ryde with me / but my self And soo wille I ryde on tewesday next comyng and no more harneis of werre but my spere and my suerd /

¶ Capitulum xij

ANd soo whanne the daye came / syre Tristram toke his leue at la Beale Isoud / and she sente with hym / iiij knyghtes / and within half a myle he sente them ageyne / and within a myle after sir Tristram sawe afore hym where sir palomydes had stryken doune a knyghte / and al moost wounded hym to the dethe / Thenne syr Tristram repentyd hym / that he was not armed / and thenne he houed stylle / with that sir palomydes knewe syr Tristram and cryed on hygh / syr Tristram now be we mette / for or we departe / we wille redresse our old sores / As for that said sir Tristram there was yet neuer cristen man myghte make his boost that euer I fledde from hym / and wete ye wel syr Palomydes thow that arte a saresyn shal neuer make thy boost that syr Tristram de lyones shall flee from the / And there with syr Tristram made his hors to renne / and with all his myghte he came streyghte vpon syr Palomydes / & braste his spere vpon hym an honderd pyeces / And forth with alle sir Tristram drewe his swerd / And thenne he torned his hors & stroke at palomydes / vj / grete strokes vpon his helme / & thenne sir Palomydes stode stylle / and beheld syre Tristram / &Page  608 [leaf 304v] merueyled of his woodenes / and of his foly / And thenne sir palomydes sayd to hym self / and sir Tristram were armed / it were hard to seace hym of this bataille / and yf I torne ageyne and slee hym I am ashamed where someuer that I goo Thenne syr Tristram spake and said /

¶ Thow coward knyghte what castest thow to doo / why wolt thow not doo bataille with me / for haue thow noo doubte I shalle endure alle the malyce / A syr Tristram said Palomydes ful wel thou wotest I maye not fyghte with the for shame / for thow arte here naked and I am armed / And yf I slee the / dishonour shal be myn / and wel thow wotest said syr Palomydes to sir Tristram I knowe thy strengthe and thy hardynesse to endure ageynst a good knyghte / that is trouthe said syr Tristram I vnderstande they valyauntnesse wel / ye saye wel said syr Palomydes / Now I requyre yow telle me a question that I shalle saye to yow / Telle me what hit is said syr Tristram / and I shalle ansuer yow the trouthe as god me helpe / I putte caas said sir Palomydes that ye were armed at al ryȝtes as wel as I am / and I naked as ye be what wold ye doo to me now by your true knyghthode / A said syr Tristram now I vnderstande the wel syr Palomydes / for now must I say myn own Iugement / and as god me blysse that I shalle say / shal not be said for no fere that I haue of the / But this is all wete sir Palomydes / as at this tyme thou sholdest departe from me / for I wold not haue adoo with the / no more wil I said palomydes / & therfor ryde forth an thy way / as for that I maye chese said sir Tristram outher to ryde or to abyde / but sir Palomydes said sir Tristram I merueille of one thyng that thow that art soo good a knyghte that thow wolt not be crystened / & thy broder syr Safere hath ben Crystened many a daye

¶ Capitulum xiij

AS for that said sire Palomydes I may not yet be cristened / for one auowe that I haue made many yeres agone / how be it in my herte I bileue in Ihesu crist & his mylde moder mary / but I haue one batail to do / & when that is done I wil be baptysed with a good wille

¶ By my hede sayd Tristram as for one bataille thou shat not Page  609 [leaf 305r] seke it no lenger / For god defende said sir Tristram that thurȝ my defaute thou sholdest lenger lyue thus a sarasyn / for yonder is a knyghte that ye syre Palomydes haue hurte & smyten doune / Now helpe me that I were armed in his armour / and I shalle soone fulfylle thyne auowes / As ye wille said palomydes soo it shalle be / Soo they rode bothe vnto that knyghte that satte vpon a bank / and thenne sir Tristram salewed hym and he wekely salewed hym ageyne / Sir knyȝt said sir Tristram I requyre yow telle me your ryghte name / Sir he sayd my name is syr Galleron of Galway and knyghte of the table round / Soo god me help said sir Tristram I am ryghte heuy of your hurtes / but his is alle I must praye yow to lene me alle your hole armour / for ye see I am vnarmed / and I must doo batail with this knyght / syr said the hurte knyghte ye shalle haue hit with a good will / but ye muste beware for I warne yow that knyghte is wyghte / Syr sayd Galeron I praye yow telle me your name / and what is that knyghtes name þt hath beten me / Sir as for my name it is sir Tristram de lyones / and as for the knyghtes name that hath hurte you is syr Palomydes broder to the good knyghte syre Safere / & yet is syr Palomydes vncrystened / Allas said syr Galleron/ that is pyte that soo good a knyghte and soo noble a man of armes shold be vncrystened / Soo god me help said sir Tristram outher he shalle slee me or I hym / but that he shalle be crystened / or euer we departe in sonder / My lord syr Tristram said sir Galeron / your renoume and worship is wel knowen thorou many reames / and god saue yow this day from senshyp and shame / Thenne syr Tristram vnarmed Galeron / the whiche was a noble knyghte / and had done many dedes of armes / and he was a large knyghte of flesshe and boone / And whan he was vnarmed he stood vpon his feet / for he was brysed in the bak with a spere / yet soo as syr Galleron myghte he armed syr Tristram / And thenne syr Tristram mounted vpon his owne hors and in his hand he gat syr Gallerons spere / and there with al syr palomydes was redy / & soo they came hurtlynge to gyders / and eyther smote other in myddes of theyr sheldes / & there with al sir Palomydes spere brak / and syre Tristram smote doune the hors / and sir Palomydes as soone Page  610 [leaf 305v] as he myghte auoyde his hors / & dressid his sheld / & pulled oute his swerd / that sawe sir Tristram / & there with al he alyght and teyed his hors tyl a tree

¶ Capitulum xiiij

ANd thenne they came to gyders as two wyld bores / lasshynge to gyders tracyng and trauercyng as noble men / that ofte had ben wel proued in batail / but euer syr Palomydes dredde the myghte of syre Tristram / and therfor he suffred hym to brethe hym / thus they fought more than two houres / but often syr Tristram smote suche strokes at sir Palomydes that he made hym to knele / and syre Palomydes brake and cutte awey many pyeces of sir Tristrams shelde / & thenne sir Palomydes wounded sir Tristram for he was a wel fyghtynge man / Thenne sire Tristram was woode wrothe oute of mesure and rasshed vpon syr Palomydes with suche a myght

that sire Palomydes felle grouelynge to the erthe / & there with alle he lepte vp lyghtely vpon his feet / and thenne syre Tristram wounded Palomydes sore thurgh the sholder / & euer syr Tristram foughte stylle in lyke hard / and syr Palomydes fayled not but gaf hym many sadde strokes / And atte laste syr Tristram doubled his strokes / & by fortune syre Tristram smote syr Palomydes swerd oute of his hand / & yf sir Palomydes had stouped for his swerd he had ben slayne / Thenne Palomydes stode stylle and beheld his swerd with a sorouful herte / How now said syr Tristram vnto Palomydes / now haue I the at auauntage as thow haddest me this daye / but it shalle neuer be said in no Courte nor among good knyghtes that syr Tristram shalle slee ony knyghte that is wepenles / & therfor take thow thy swerd / & let vs make an ende of thys batail / As for to doo this batail sayd Palomydes I dar ryȝt wel ende hit / but I haue no grete luste to fyghte no more / and for this cause said Palomydes / Myn offence to yow is not soo grete / but that we may be frendes / Alle that I haue offended is and was for the loue of la Beale Isoud / And as for her/ I dar say she is pyerles aboue alle other ladyes / and also I Page  611 [leaf 306r] proferd her neuer no dishonour / and by her I haue geten the moost parte of my worship / and sythen I offended neuer as to her owne persone / And as for the offence that I haue done/ it was ageynste your owne persone / And for that offence ye haue gyuen me this day many sad strokes / and some I haue yeuen yow ageyne / and now I dar say I felte neuer man of your myghte / nor soo wel brethed / but yf hit were syr launcelot du lake / wherfor I requyre yow my lord / forgyue me alle that I haue offended vnto yow / And this same day haue me to the next chirche / and fyrst lete me be clene confessed / And after see yow now that I be truly baptysed / And thenne wil we alle ryde to gyders vnto the courte of Arthur that we be there at the hyhe feeste / Now take your hors said sir Tristram And as ye say / soo hit shal be / and alle thyn euylle wil god forgyue it yow and I doo / And here within this myle is the suffrecan of Carleil that shalle gyue yow the sacrament of baptym / Thenne they took their horses and sire Galleron rode wyth them /

¶ And whanne they cam to the suffrecan syre Tristram told hym their desyre / Thenne the suffrecan lete fylle a grete vessel with water / And whanne he had halowed hit / he thenne confessid clene syr Palomydes / and syr Tristram and sir galleron were his godfaders / And thenne soone after they departed rydynge toward Camelot / where kynge Arthur & Quene Gueneuer was / And for the moost party alle the knyghtes of the round table / And so the kynge and all the Court were glad that syre Palomydes was crystened / And at the same fesste in came Galahad and sat in the sege perillous/

¶ And soo there with alle departed and disseuered alle the knyghtes of the round table / and sire Tristram retorned ayene vnto Ioyous gard / and syr Palomydes folowed the questynge beest

¶ here endeth the second book of syr Tristram that was drawen oute of Frensshe in to Englysshe But here is no rehersal of the thyrd book /

¶ And here foloweth the noble tale of the Sancgreal that called is the hooly vessel and the sygnefycacyon of the blessid blood of our lord Ihesu Cryste / blessid mote it be / the whiche was brought in to Page  612 [leaf 306v] this land by Ioseph of Armathye / therfor on al synful souls blessid lord haue thou mercy

 

Explicit liber xij / Et incipit Decimustercius

 
 
 

 

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