XIII

(Winchester f.358-409; Caxton XIII.13-XVII.23; Vinaver, Vol. 2, pp. 884.4-1037.13; Shepherd pp. 511.1-587.41)

 
 
 
 

 

f. 358 (XIII.13)

A

nd than rode Sir Melyas In to an olde foreyste and Þer In he roode

ij dayes and more and than he cam Into a fayre medow and

there was a fayre lodge of bowys And than he aspyed in that lodge        

a chayre where In was a crowne of golde ryche and subtyly wrouȝt    

Also there was clothys couerde vppon the erthe and many delycious      

metis sette Þer on // So sir Melyas be hylde thys aduenture and thouȝt       

hit mervaylous but he had no hungir but of the crowne of golde he

toke much kepe and there with he stowped downe and toke hit vp

and rode hys way with hit And anone he saw a knyght com rydyng

aftir hym and seyde knyght sett downe that crowne whych ys nat

youres and there fore defende you // Than Sir Melyas blyssed hym and

seyde fayre lorde of hevyn helpe and save thy new made knyght And

than they lette Þer horses renne as faste as they myght and so they

smote to gydirs but the othir knyght smote Sir Melyas thorow

hawbirke and thorow the lyff syde that he felle to the erth nyȝe dede

And than he toke hys crowne and yode hys way And Sir Melyas

lay stylle and had no power to styrre hym // So in the meane whyle

by fortune by fortune com Sir Galahad and founde hym Þer in perell

of dethe And than he seyde Sir Melyas who hath wounded you Þer

fore hit had bene bettir to haue ryddyn the oÞer way And whan Sir

Melyas herde hym speke Sir he seyde for goddys love lat me nat dye

in thys foreyst but brynge me to the abbey here be syde that I may

be confessed and haue my ryghtes Hit shall be done seyde sir Galahad

But where ys he that hath wounded you // So with that Sir Galahad

herde on a monge the levys cry on hyght knyght kepe the from

me A Sir seyde Sir Melyas Be ware for that ye he that hath slayne

me Sir Galahad answerde and seyde Sir knyght com on your perell

Than aythir dressed to oÞer and com as fast as they myght dryve

And Sir Galahad smote hym so that hys speare wente thorow his

shuldir and smote hym downe of hys horse And in the fallyng

Sir Galahaddis speare brake // So with that com oute anoÞer knyȝt

 

f. 358v (XIII.13-14)

 

oute of the grene levys and brake a spere vppon Sir Galahad or euer he

myght turne hym // Than Sir Galahad drew oute hys swerde and

smote the lyffte arme off that hit felle to the erthe And than he fledde

And Sir Galahad sewed faste aftir hym and than he turned a gayne

vnto Sir Melyas and there he alyght and dressed hym softely on

hys horse to fore hym for the truncheon of hys speare was in hys

body And Sir Galahad sterte vp be hynde hym and hylde hym in hys

armys and so brought hym to the abbay And there vnarmed hym

and brought hym to hys chambir and than he asked hys saveoure

And whan he had reseyved hym he seyde vnto Sir Galahad Syr

Latte dethe com whan hit pleasith hym and there with he drew the

truncheon of the speare oute of hys body And than he sowned Than

Than com Þer an olde monke whych som tyme had bene a knyght and

be hylde Sir Melyas and anone he ransaked hym And Þan he seyde

vnto Sir Galahad I shall heale hym of hys play by the grace of

god with In the terme of vij yers wykes // Than was Sir Galahad

glad and vnarmed hym and seyde he wolde a byde there stylle all

that nyght Thus dwelled he there iij· dayes And Þan he asked Sir

Melyas how hit stood with hym // Than he seyde he was turned in to

helpynge god bethanked Now woll I departe Sir Galahad seyde for I

haue much on honde for many good knyghtes be fulle bysy a boute hit

and thys knyght and I were in the same quest of the Sankgreal

Sir seyde a good man for hys synne he was thys wounded & I meruayle

seyde the good man how ye durste take vppon you so rych a thynge

as the hyȝe order of knyghthode ys with oute clene confession Þat was

the cause that ye were bittirly wounded for the way on Þe ryght

hande be tokenyd the hyȝe way of oure lorde Jhu cryst and the way

of a good trew lyvor And the othir way be tokenyth Þe way of a

synnars and of mysse belevers And whan the devyll saw your pryde

and youre presumpcion for to take you to the queste of Þe Sankgreal

and that made you to be euer throwyn for hit may nat be encheved

 

f. 359 (XIII.14-15)

 

but by vertuos lyvynge Also the wrytyng on the crosse was a significacon

of hevynly dedys and of knyghtly dedys in goddys workys & no knyȝtes

dedys in worldly workis and pryde ys hede of euery synne that caused

thys knyght to departe frome Sir Galahad and where Þou toke the

crowne of golde Þou ded syn in Covetyse and in theffte All Þis was

no knyghtly dedys And so Sir Galahad the holy knyght which fouȝt

with Þe ij· knyghtes signyfyeth the ij· dedly synnes whych were holy in Þys

knyght Sir Melias and they myght nat withstonde you for ye are with

oute dedly synne So now departed Sir Galahad frome Þens and be

tauȝte hem all vnto god // Than sir Melias seyde my lorde Syr

Galahad as sone as I may ryde I shall seke you // God sende you helthe

seyde Sir Galahad and so he toke hys horse and departed and rode

many Journeyes forewarde and bakwarde and departed frome a place

that hyght Abblasowre and had harde no masse // Than sir Galahad

com to a mowtayne where he founde a chapell passyng olde & founde

Þer In no body for all was desolate And there he kneled be fore Þe awter

and be souȝt god of good counceyle // And so as he prayde he harde a 

voyce that seyd Go Þou now Þou aduenturus knyght to the castell

of Madyns and there do Þou a way the wycked customes // whan

Sir Galahad harde thys he thanked god and toke hys horse and

he had nat ryddyn but a whyle but he saw in a valey be fore

hym a stronge castell with depe dychys and there ran be syde hyt a

fayre ryver that hyght Sevarne and there he mette with a man

of grete ayge and ayÞer salewed oÞer And Sir Galahad asked hym Þe

castels name // Fayre Sir seyde he hit ys the castell of maydyns

that ys a cursed castell and all they that be conuersaunte Þer In for

all pite ys oute Þer off and all hardynes and myschyff ys Þer In There

fore I counceyle you Sir knyght to turne agayne Sir Sir Gala//

had seyde wete you welle that I shall nat turne agayne Than lo//

ked sir Galahad on hys armys that no thyng fayled hym and

Þan he putte hys shylde be fore hym And anone there mette hym

 

f. 359v (XIII.15)

 

vij· fayre maydyns the whych seyde vnto hym Sir knyght ye ryde

here in grete foly for ye have the watir to passe ouer // Why shold I nat

passe the watir seyde Sir Galahad So rode he a way frome hem

and mette with a squyre that seyde knyght Þoo knyghtes in Þe castel·

defyeth you and defendith you ye go no farther tyll that Þey wete

what ye wolde // Fayre sir seyde Sir Galahad I com for to destroy

the wycked custom of thys castell Sir and ye woll A byde by Þat

ye shall haue I nowȝe to do // Go ye now seyde Sir Galahad and

hast my nedys Than the squyre entird in to the castell And a

none aftir there com oute of the castell vij· knyghtes and all were

brethirne And whan they saw Sir Galahad they cryed knyght

kepe the for we assure you no thyng but deth· // Why seyd Galahad

woll ye all haue a do with me at onys // yee seyde they Þer to mayste

Þou truste // Than Galahad put forth hys speare and smote the

formyst to the erthe that nere honde he brake hys necke And

there with all the oÞer vj· smote hym on hys shylde grete strokes

that Þer sperys brake Than Sir Galahad drew oute hys swerde

and sette vppon hem so harde that hit was mervayle and so

thorow grete force he made hem for to for sake the fylde And

Sir Galahad chased hem tylle they entird in to the castell and

so passed thorow the castell at a noÞer gate // And anone Þer mette

an olde man clothyd in relygyous clothynge and seyde Syr

have here the Kayes of thys castell Than sir Galahad openyd

the gatis and saw so muche people in the stretys that he myȝt

nat numbir hem And all they seyde Sir ye be wellcom for longe

haue we a bydyn here oure delyueraunce Than com to hym a

Jantill woman and seyde sir thes knyghtes be fledde but they

woll com a gayne thys nyght and here to be gyn a gayne Þer

evyll custom // What woll ye that I do seyde Sir Galahad

Sir seyde the Jantilwoman that ye sende aftir all the knyghtes

hydir that holde Þer londys of thys castell // And make hem all

 

f. 360 (XIII.15)

 

to swere for to vse the customs that were vsed here of olde tyme I woll

well seyde Sir Galahad and there she brought hym an horne of Iuery

boundyn with golde rychely and seyde Sir blow thys horne which·

woll be harde ij myles a boute whan Sir Galahad had blowyn

the horne he sette hym downe vppon a bedde // Than com a pryste

to Galahad and seyde Sir hit ys past a vij yere a gone Þat Þes vij

brethirne com Into thys castell and herberowde with the lorde of Þis

castell that hyght the dyuke Lyanowre and he was lorde of all Þis

contrey And whan they had aspyed the dyukes douȝter that was

a full fayre woman Than by there false Covyn they made a bate

be twyxte hem selff and the deuke of hys goodnes wolde haue

departed them and there they slew hym and hys eldyst sonne // And

than they toke the maydyn and the tresoure of the castell and so

by grete force they helde all the knyghtes of the contrey vndir grete

servayge and trewayge So on a day the deukes douȝter seyde to

them ye haue done grete wronge to sle my fadir and my brothir

And thus to holde oure londys Nat for Þan she seyde ye shall nat

holde thys castell many yerys for by one knyght ye shall all be

ouer com // Thus she prophecyed vij· yerys a gone // well seyde the vij

knyghtes sytthyn ye sey so there shall neuer lady noÞer knyght passe

thys castell but they shall a byde magre Þer hedys oÞer dye Þer fore tyll

that knyght be com by whom we shall lose thys castell and Þer

for hit ys called the maydyns castell for they have devoured

many maydyns Now seyde Sir Galahad ys she here for whom

thys castell was loste Nay Sir seyde the pryste she was dede with

In iij· nyghtes aftir that she was Þus forsed and sytthen haue

they kepte Þer yonger syster whych enduryth grete payne with mo

er ladyes By thys were the knyghtes of the contrey com And

than he made hem to do omage and feawte to the dukes douȝter

and sette them in grete ease of harte And in  the morne Þer com

 

f. 360v (XIII.15-16)

 

and tolde Sir Galahad how that Sir Gawayne sir Gareth & sir vwayne

had slayne the vij· brethirne I supposse well seyde Sir Galahad and

toke hys armoure and hys horse and commaunded hem vnto god here

levith the tale of Sir Galahad and spekith of Sir Gawayne

NOw seyth the tale aftir Sir Gawayne departed he rode many

Journeys both towarde and frowarde and at the last they

com to the abbey where Sir Galahad had the whyght shylde and Þer

Sir Gawayne lerned the way to sewe aftir Sir Galahad and so

he rode to the abbey where Melyas lay syke and there sir Melyas

tolde Sir Gawayne of the mervaylous adventures that sir Ga//

lahad dud Sertes seyde Sir Gawayne I am nat happy that I

toke nat the way that he wente for and I may mete with hym

I woll nat departe from hym lyghtly for all mervaylous aduen//

tures Sir Galahad enchevith Sir seyde one of the munkes he woll

nat of youre felyship // Why so seyde sir Gawayne Sir seyd he

for ye be wycked and synfull and he ys full bylssed So ryght

as they thus talked there com In rydynge Sir Gareth· and

than they made grete Joy aythir of oÞer and on the morne they

herde masse and so departed And by the way they mett with Sir

Vwayne le Avowtres and the Sir Vwayne tolde Sir Gawayne

that he had mette with none aduentures syth he departed frome

the courte noÞer yet we seyd Sir Gawayne And so ayÞer promysed

othir of Þo iij knyghtes nat to departe whyle they were in Þat queste

but if suddayne fortune caused hyt So they departed and rode

by fortune tyll that they cam by the castell of maydyns And Þer

the vij brethirn aspyed the iij knyghtes and seyde sytthyn we

be flemyd by one knyght from thys castell we shall destroy

all the knyghtes of kyng Arthurs that we may ouer com for

the love of Sir Galahad And there with the vij knyghtes sette

vppon hem iij· knyghtes And by Fortune Sir Gawayne

slew one the brethirn and ech one of hys felowys ouer threw

f. 361 (XIII.16)

anothir and so slew all the remenaunte And than they toke the

wey vndir the castell and there they loste the way that sir Ga//

lahad rode and there euerych of hem departed from oÞer And Syr

Gawayne rode tyll he com to an Ermytayge and Þer he founde

the good man seyynge hys evynsonge of oure lady And Þer Sir

asked herberow for charite and the good man graunted hym

gladly Than the good man asked hym what he was // Sir he seyde

I am a knyght of kynge Arthures that am in the queste of the

Sankgreall and my name ys Sir Gawayne Sir seyde Þe good

man I wolde wete How hit stondith be twyxte god and you // Sir

seyd Sir Gawayne I wyll with a good wyll shew you my lyff

if hit please you There he tolde the Eremyte how a monke of an

abbay called me wycked knyght he myght well sey hit seyde the

Eremyte for whan ye were made first knyght ye sholde have

takyn you to knyghtly dedys and vertuous lyvyng And ye have

done the contrary for ye have lyved myschevously many wyntirs

And Sir Galahad ys a mayde and synned neuer and that ys Þe cause

he shall enchyve where he goth that ye nor none suche shall

neuer attayne noÞer none in youre felyship for ye have vsed Þe moste

vntrewyst lyff that euer I herd knyght lyve For sertes had ye nat

bene so wycked as ye ar neuer had the vij brethirne be slayne by

you and youre ij felowys For Sir Galahad hym self a lone

bete hem all vij the day to forne but hys lyvyng ys such Þat he

shall sle no man lyghtly Also I may sey you that the castell

of maydyns betokenyth the good soulys that were in preson

be fore the Incarnacion of oure lorde Jhu cryste // And Þe vij·

knyghtes betokenyth the vij· dedly synnes that regned that tyme

in the worlde and I may lyckyn the good knyght Galahad

vnto the sonne of the hyȝe fadir that lyght with In a maydyn

and bouȝt all the soules oute of thralle So ded sir Galahad

 

f. 361v (XIII.16-17)

 

delyuer all the maydyns out of the woofull castell Now sir Gawayne

seyde the good man Þou muste do penaunce for thy synne Sir what

penaunce shall I do // Such as I woll gyff the seyde the good man Nay

seyd Sir Gawayne I may do no penaunce for we knyghtes aduentures

many tymes suffir grete woo and payne well seyde the good man

and than he hylde hys pece And on the morne than Sir Gaw//

ayne departed frome the Ermyte and by tauȝt hym vnto god And

by adventure he mette wyth Sir Agglouale and Sir Gryfflet

ij knyghtes of the rounde table and so they iiij· rode iiij· dayes with oute

fyndynge of ony aduenture And at the v· day they departed & euerych·

hylde as felle them by aduenture // Here levith the tale of Syr

Gawayne and hys felowys and spekith of Sir Galahad

So whan Sir Galahad was departed frome the castell

of maydyns he rode tyll he com to a waste forest And

there he mette With Sir Launcelot and Sir Percivale but

they knew hym nat for he was new dysgysed // Ryght so hys

fadir Sir Launcelot dressed hys speare and brake hit vppon

Sir Galahad And Sir Galahad smote hym so a gayne that

he bare downe horse and man And than he drew his swerde

and dressed hym vnto Sir Percyvall and smote hym so on Þe

helme that hit rooff to the coyff of steele and had nat the

swerde swarved Sir Percyvale had be slayne and with the stroke

he felle oute of hys sadyll So thys Justis was done to fore

the Ermytayge where a recluse dwelled And whan she saw

Sir Galahad ryde she seyde god be with the beste knyght of Þe

worlde A sertes seyde she all a lowde that Sir Launclot and Per//

cyvall myght hyre and yondir ij knyghtes had knowyn the

as well as I do they wolde nat haue encountird with Þe

whan Sir Galahad herde hir sey so he was a drad to be

knowyn and there with he smote hys horse with his sporys

 

f. 362 (XIII.17-18)

 

and rode a grete pace toward them Than perceyved they bothe that he

was Sir Galahad and vp they gate on Þer horsys and rode faste

aftir hym But with In a whyle he was oute of hir syght And

than they turned a gayne wyth hevy chere and seyde lat vs

spyrre som tydynges seyde Percyvale at yondir rekles Do as ye lyst

seyde Sir Launcelot So whan Sir Percyvale com to the recluse

she knew hym well y noughe And Sir Launcelot both · But Syr

Launcelot rode ouertwarte and endelonge a wylde foreyst and hylde

no patthe but as wylde aduenture lad hym And at the last he

com to a stony crosse whych departed ij· wayes in waste londe And

by the crosse was a stone that was a marble but hit was so

durke that Sir Launcelot myght not wete what hyt was //

Than Sir Launcelot loked be syde hym and saw an olde chapell

and there he wente to haue founde people And anone sir Launclot

fastenyd hys horse tylle a tre and there he dud of hys shylde & hynge

hyt vppon a tre and than he wente to the chapell dore & founde

hit waste and brokyn and with In he founde a fayre awter full

rychely arayde with clothe of clene sylke and there stoode a clene

fayre candyll stykke whych bare vj· grete candyls Þer In & Þe candilstyk

was of syluer // And whan Sir Launcelot saw thys lyght he had

grete wylle for to entir in to the chapell but he coude fynde no place

where he myght entir than was he passyng hevy & dysmayed

and returned a yen and cam to hys horse and dud of hys sadyll

and brydyll and leete hym pasture hym and vnlaced hys helme

& vngerde hys swerde and layde hym downe to slepe vppon hys

shylde to fore the crosse // And so he felle on slepe and half wakyng

and half slepynge he saw commyng by hym ij· palfreyes all fayre

and whyght whych bare a lytter and there In lyyng a syke

knyght and whan he was nyȝe the crosse he there abode stylle

 

f. 362v (XIII.18)

           

All thys Sir Sir Launcelot sye and be hylde hit for he slepte nat

veryly and he herde hym sey a sweete lorde whan shall thys sorow

leve me And whan shall the holy vessell com by me where thorow I

shall be heled For I haue endured Þus longe for litill trespasse a full

grete whyle Þus complayned the knyght And all ways sir Launcelot

harde hit / So with that Sir Launcelot sye the candyll styk with the vij

tapirs cam be fore the crosse and he saw no body that brouȝt hit Also

there cam a table of Syluer and the holy vessell of the Sankgreall

which Sir Launcelot had sene to fore tyme In kynge Petechens house

and there with the syke knyght sette hym vp and hylde vp both hys

hondys and seyde fayre swete lorde whych ys here with In Þe holy ves//

sell take hede vnto me that I may be hole of thys malody And Þer with

on hys hondys and kneys he wente so nyȝe that he towched the

holy vessell and kyst hit and anone he was hole And than he

seyde lorde god I thanke the for I am helyd of thys syknes // So whan

the holy vessell had bene there a grete whyle hit went vnto the

chapell with the chaundeler and the lyght So that sir Launcelot

wyst nat where hit was be com for he was ouer takyn with synne Þat

he had no power to ryse a gayne the holy vessell where fore aftir

that many men seyde hym shame but he toke repentaunce aftir

that Than the syke knyght dressed hym vp and kyssed the crosse

Anone hys squyre brougt hym hys armys and aske hys lorde

how he ded // Sertes seyde he I thanke god ryght well thorow Þe holy

vessell I am heled // But I haue meruayle of thys slepyng knyght

that he had no power to awake whan thys holy vessell was

brought hydir // I dare well sey seyde the squyre that he dwellith

in som dedly synne where of he was neuer confessed // Be my fayth

seyde the knyght what som euer he be he ys vnhappy for as I deme

he ys of the felyship of thex rounde table whych ys entird in Þe

queste of the Sankgreall Sir seyde the squyre here I haue brouȝt

you all youre armys save youre helme and youre swerde And Þer

 

f. 363 (XIII.18-19)

 

fore be myne assente now may ye take thys knyghtes helme and his

swerde and so he dud And whan he was clene armed he toke Þer sir

Launcelottis horse for he was bettir than hys and so departed they

frome the crosse Than anone Sir Launcelot waked and sett hym

vp and be thouȝt hym what he had sene there and wheÞer hit were

dremys or nat Ryght so harde he a voyse that seyde Sir Launclot

more harder than ys the stone and more bitter than ys the woode

and more naked and barer than ys the lyeff of the fygge tre There

fore go Þou from hens and with draw the from thys holy places

And whan Sir Launcelot herde thys he was passyng hevy and

wyst nat what to do and so departed sore wepynge and cursed Þe tyme

that he was bore for than he demed neuer to haue worship more

for Þo wordis wente to hys herte tylle that he knew where fore

he was called so // Than Sir Launcelot wente to the crosse & founde

hys helme hys swerde and hys crosse a way And than he called

hym selff a verry wrecch and moste vnhappy of all knyghtes

and there he seyde my synne and my wyckednes hath brouȝt me

vnto grete dishonoure for whan I fouȝ3t worldly aduentures for

worldely desyres I euer encheved them and had the bettir in euery

place and neuer was I discomfite in no quarell were hit ryght

were hit wronge And now I take vppon me the aduentures to seke

of holy thynges Now I se and vndirstonde that myne olde synne

hyndryth me and shamyth me That I had no power to stirre noÞer

speke whan the holy bloode appered be fore me // So Þus he sorowed

tyll hit was day and harde the fowlys synge than som what

he was comforted // But whan Sir Launcelot myssed his horse

and hys harneyse than he wyst well god was displesed with hym

And so he departed frome the crosse on foote In to a fayre foreyste

and so by pryme he cam to an hyȝe hylle and founde an Ermytage

and an Ermyte Þer In whych was goyng vnto masse And Þan sir

 

f. 363v (XIII.19-20)

 

Launcelot kneled downe and cryed on oure lorde mercy for hys wycked

workys // So whan masse was done Sir Launcelot called hym and

prayde hym for seynte charite for to hyre hys lyff // with a good

wylle seyde the good man and asked hym whethir he was of kyng

Arthurs and of the felyship of the table rounde // ye for soth sir and my

name ys Sir Launcelot du lake that hath bene ryght well seyde off and

now my good fortune ys chonged for I am the moste wrecch · of Þe worlde

The Ermyte be hylde hym and had meruayle whye he was so abaysshed

Sir seyde the Ermyte ye ought to thanke god more Þan ony knyght

lyvynge for he hath h caused you to haue more worldly worship

than ony knyght that ys now lyvynge And for youre presumpcion

to take vppon you In dedely synne for to be in hys presence where hys

fleyssh and hys blood was which caused you ye myght nat se hyt with

youre worldely yen for he woll nat appere where such synners bene

but if hit be vnto Þer grete hurte oÞer vnto Þer shame And Þer Is no knyȝt

now lyvynge that ouȝt to yelde god so I grete thanke os ye for he

hath yevyn you beaute bownte semelynes and grete strengthe ouer all

er knyghtes And Þer fore ye ar the more be holdyn vnto god Þan ony

er man to love hym and drede hym for youre strengthe & your manhode

woll litill a vayle you and god be a gaynste you // Than sir Launclot

wepte with hevy harte And seyde now I know well ye sey me soÞe

Sir seyde the good man hyde none olde synne frome me Truly seyde

Sir Launcelot that were me full lothe to discouer for thys xiiij yere

I neuer discouerde one thynge that I have vsed and that may I now

wyȝte my shame and my disaduenture And Þan he tolde Þer the

good man all hys lyff and how he had loved a quene vnmesu//

rabely and out of mesure longe And all my grete dedis of armys

that I haue done for the moste party was for the quenys sake

And for hir sake wolde I do batayle were hit ryght oÞer wronge

and neuer dud I batayle all only goddis sake but for to wynne

worship and to cause me the bettir to be be loved and litill or

 

f. 364 (XIII.20)

 

nouȝt I thanked neuer god of hit // Than Sir Launcelot seyde Sir I pray

you counceyle me // Sir I woll counceyle you seyde the ermyte ye shall

ensure me by youre knyghthode ye shall no more com in that quenys

felyship as much as ye may for bere And than sir Launcelot promysed

hym that he nolde by the faythe of hys body // Sir loke that your harte

and youre mowth accorde seyde the good man And I shall ensure you

ye shall haue the more worship than euer ye had // Holy fadir seyde sir

Launcelot I mervayle of the voyce that seyde to me mervayles wordes

as ye haue herde to fore honde // haue ye no meruayle seyde the good

man Þer off for hit semyth well god lovith you for men may vndir//

stonde a stone ys harde of kynde And namely one more Þan a noÞer

and that ys to vndir stonde by the Sir Launcelot for Þou wolt nat

leve thy synne for no goodnes that god hath sente the there fore Þou

arte more harder Þan ony stone and woldyst neuer be made neyssh

noÞer by watir noÞer by fyre and that ys the hete of Þe holy goste may

nat entir in the now take hede in all the worlde men shall nat fynde

one knyght to whom oure lorde hath yevyn so much of grace as he

hath lente the for he hathe yeffyn the fayrenes with semelynes Also

he hath yevyn the wytte & discression to know good frome Ille he//

hath also yevyn provesse and hardnesse and gevyn the to worke so

largely that Þou hast had Þe bettir all thy dayes of thy lyff where

som euer Þou cam and now oure lorde wolde suffir the no lenger

but Þat Þou shalt know hym wheÞer Þo wolt oÞer nylt And why

the voyce called the bitterer than Þe woode for where som euer much

synne dwellith Þere may be but lytyll swettnesse where fore Þou

art lykened to an olde rottyn tre // Now haue I shewed Þe why Þou

art harder Þan Þe stone & bitterer Þan the tre Now shall I shew

the why Þou art more naked and barer Þan Þe fygge tre // hit

be felle that oure lorde on palme sonday preched in Jerlm & Þer

he founde in the people that all hardnes whas herberowd in them

 

f. 364v (XIII.20- XIV.1)

 

and there he founde in all the towne nat one that wolde herberow hym

And than he wente oute of the towne and founde in myddis the way

a fygge tre which was ryght fayre and well garnysshed of levys

but fruyte had hit none Than oure lorde cursed the tre Þat bare no fruyte

that betokenyth the fyg tre vnto Jerlm that had levys & no fruyte

So Þou Sir Launcelot whan the holy grayle was brought be fore

the he founde in the no fruyte noÞer good thouȝt noÞer good wylle and

defouled with lechory // Sertes seyde Sir Launcelot all that ye have

seyde ys trew And frome hens forewarde I caste me by the grace

of god neuer to be so wycked and I haue bene but as to sew knyȝthode

and to do fetys of armys Than thys good man Joyned Sir Launclot

suche penaunce as he myght do and to sew knyghthode and so assoy//

led hym and prayde hym to a byde with hym all that day I woll

well seyde Sir Launcelot for I haue noÞer helme horse ne swerde

As for that seyde the good man I shall helpe you or to morne at

evyn of an horse and all that longith vnto you And Þan Sir

Launcelot repented hym gretly of hys mysse dedys Here levith

the tale of Sir Launcelot and begynnyth of Sir Percyvale de galis

Now seyth the tale that whan Sir Launcelot was ryddyn

aftir Sir Galahad the whych had all thes aduentures

a bouen seyd Sir Percivale turned a gayne vnto the recluse

where he demed to haue tydynges of that knyght that Sir Launclot

folowed and so he kneled at hir wyndow and the Recluse ope//

ned hit and asked Sir Percivale what he wolde // Madam he

seyde I am a knyght of kyng Arthurs courte and my name

ys sir Percivale de galis // whan the recluse herde his name

she had grete Joy of hym for mykyll she loved hym to forn pas//

syng ony oÞer knyght she ouȝt so to do for she was hys awnte

And Þan she commaunded the gatis to be opyn and Þer he had

grete chere as grete as she myght make hym or ly in hir power

So on the morne Sir Percyvale wente to the recluse & asked

 

 

 

                                                     her if

 

f. 365 (XIV.1-2)

 

her if she knew that knyght with the whyght shylde // Sir seyde she why

woll ye wete Truly madam seyde Sir Percyvale I shall neuer be well

at ease tyll that I know of that knyghtes felyship and that I nar na may

fyght with hym for I may nat leve hym so lyghtly for I haue the

shame as yette // A Sir Percyvale seyde she wolde ye fyght with hym

I se well ye haue grete wyll to be slayne as youre fadir was tho//

row outerageousnes slayne // Madam hit semyth by your wordis

that ye know me // yee seyde she I well ouȝte to know you for I am

youre awnte all Þouȝe I be in a poore place for som men called me

som tyme the quene of the wast landis and I was called Þe quene

of moste rychesse in the worlde And hit pleased me neuer so much·

my rychesse as doth my pouerte // Than Percyvale wepte for

verry pite whan he knew hit was hys awnte A fayre nevew

seyde she whan herde you tydynges of youre modir // Truly seyde he

I herde none of hir but I dreme of hir muche in my slepe and

Þer fore I wote nat whethir she be dede oÞer a lyve // Sertes fayre

nevew youre modir ys dede for aftir youre departynge frome her

she toke such a sorow that anone as she was confessed she dyed

Now god haue mercy on hir soule seyde Sir Percyvale hit sore

for thynkith me but all we must change the lyff Now fayre

awnte what ys that knyght I deme hit be he that bare Þe rede

armys on whytsonday // wyte you well seyde she that Þei ys he

for othir wyse ouȝt he nat to do but to go in rede armys and

that same knyght hath no peere for he worchith all by myracle

and he shall neuer be ouer com of none erthly mannnys hande Also

Merlyon made the rounde table in tokenyng of rowndnes of the

worlde for men sholde by the rounde table vndirstonde Þe rowndenes

signyfyed by ryght / For all the worlde crystenyd and hethyn

repayryth vnto the rounde table and whan they ar chosyn to

be of the felyshyp of the rounde table they thynke hem selff more

 

f. 365v (XIV.2-3)

 

blessed and more in worship than they had gotyn halff the worlde

and ye haue sene that they haue loste hir fadirs and hir modirs

and all all hir kynne and hir wyves and hir chyldren for to be of

youre felyship / hit ys well seyne be you for synes ye departed from your

modir ye wolde neuer se her ye founde such felyship at the table rounde

whan Merlyon had ordayned the rounde table he seyde by them

whych sholde be felowys of the rounde table the trouth of the

Sankegreall sholde be well knowyn And men asked hym how

they myght know them that sholde best do and to encheve the

Sankgreall Than he seyde Þer sholde be iij· whyght bullis sholde

encheve hit and Þe ij· sholde be maydyns and the thirde sholde be

chaste And one of Þos iij· shold passe hys fadir as much as the

lyon passith the lybarde both of strength and of hardines //

They that herde Merlion sey so seyde Þus / Suthyn Þer shall be

such a knyght Þou sholdyst ordayne by thy craufftes a syge Þat no

man shold sytte in hit but he all only that shold passe all oÞer

knyghtes Than Merlyon answerde that he wold so do And Þan

he made the Syge perelous whych Galahad sate at hys mete

on whyttsonday last past // Now madam seyde Sir Percyvale

so much haue I herde of you that be my good wyll I woll neuer

haue ado with Sir Galahad but by wey of goodnesse And for

goddis love fayre awnte Can ye teche me whe I myght fynde

hym for much I wolde love the felyship of hym // Fayre ne//

vew seyde she ye muste ryde vnto a castell the whych ys

called Gooth where he hath a Cousyn Jermayne and Þer may

ye be lodged thys nyght and as he techith you sewith afftir

as faste as ye can and if he can telle you no tydynges of hym

ryde streyte vnto the castell of Carbonek where Þe may med

kyng ys lyyng for there shall ye hyre trew tydynges of hym

Than departed Sir percivale frome hys awnte aythir makyng

 

f. 366 (XIV.3)

 

grete sorow and so he rode tyll aftir evynsonge and than he

herde a clock smyte and anone he was ware of an house closed

well with wallys and depe dyches and there he knocke at the

gate and a none he was lette In and was ledde vnto a chamber

and sone on armed // And there he had ryght good chere all Þat nyȝt

And on the morne he herde hys masse and in the monestery he

founde a preste redy at the awter and on the ryght syde he saw

a pew closed with Iron And by hynde the awter he saw a ryche

bedde and a fayre as of cloth of sylke and golde Than Sir Percivale

aspyed Þat there In was a man or a woman for the visayge was

couerde than he leffte of hys lokynge and herd hys seruyse & whan

hit cam vnto the sakarynge he that lay with In the parclose dres//

syd hym vp and vncouerde hys hede and Þan hym be semed a pas//

syng olde man and he had a crowne of golde vppon hys hede

and hys shuldirs were naked and vn hylled vnto hys navyll

And than Sir Percyvale aspyde hys body was full of grete

woundys both on the shuldirs armys & vysayge and euer he hylde

vp hys hondys a gaynst oure lordis body and cryed fayre swete

lorde Jhu cryste for gete nat me and so he lay nat downe but

was all way in hys prayers and orysons and hym semed to be of

the ayge of iij· C· wynter // And whan the masse was done Þe

pryste toke oure lordys body and bare hit vnto the syke kynge and

whan he had vsed hit he ded of hys crowne and commaunded Þe

crowne to be sett on the awter // Than Sir Percyvale asked

one of the brethirn what he was Sir seyde the good man ye

haue herde much· of Joseph· of Aramathy· How he was sent

in to thys londe for to teche and preche the holy crysten faythe

and there for he suffird many persecuciouns the whych· Þe ene//

myes of Cryst ded vnto hym and in the Cite of Sarras

he conuerted a kynge whos name was Guelake and so Þe kyng

 

f. 366v (XIV.3-4)

 

cam With Joseph· in to thys londe and euer he was bysy to be there

as the Sankgreall was and on a tyme he nyghed hit so nyghe

that oure lorde was displeased with hym but euer he folowed hit

more and more tyll god stroke hym all moste blynde Than thys

knyght cryed mercy and seyde fayre lorde lat me neuer dye tyll Þe good

knyght of my blood of the ix· degre that I may se hym opynly that

shall encheve the Sankgreall and that I myght kysse hym

whan the kynge thus had made hys prayers he herde a voyce

that seyde herde ys thy prayers for Þou shalt nat dye tylle he

hath kyssed the And whan that knyght shall com the clerenes of

youre yen shall come a gayne and Þou shalt se opynly & Þy woundes

shall be heled and arft shall they neuer close And Þus be felle of

kynge Guelake And thys same kynge hath lyved iiij· C· yerys thys

holy lyff and men sey the knyght ys in thys courte that shall

heale hym // Sir seyde the good man I pray you telle me what

knyght that ye be and if that ye be of the rownde table yes for

soth and my name ys Sir Percyvale de galis And whan the

good man vndirstood hys name he made grete Joy of hym And

than Sir Percyvale departed and rode tylle the owre of none & he

mette in a valey a boute xxt men of armys whych bare in a beere

a knyght dedly slayne And whan they saw Sir Percyvale they

hym of whens he was and he seyde of the courte of kynge Arthur

Than they cryed at onys sle hym Than Sir Percivale smote

the firste to the erth and hys horse vppon hym And Þan vij of

the knyghtes smote vppon hys shylde at onys and the remenaunte

slew hys horse that he felle to the erth and had slayne hym or

takyn hym had nat the good knyght S Galahad with the rede

armys com Þer by aduenture in to Þo partys And whan he saw all

Þo knyghtes vppon one knyght // he seyde save me that knyghtes lyve

and than he dressed hym towarde the xxt men of armys as

faste as hys horse myght dryve with hys speare in hys reaste

f. 367 (XIV.4-5)

and smote the formyste horse and man to the erth and whan his

speare was brokyn he sette hys honde to hys swerde and smote on

the ryght honde and on the lyffte honde that hit was meruayle to se

And at euery stroke he smote downe one or put hym to a rebuke so

that they wolde fyght no more but fledde to a thyk foreyst And

Sir Galahad folowed them And whan Sir Percyvale saw hym

chace them so he made grete sorow that hys horse was a way And

than he wyst well hit was Sir Galahad and cryed a lowde

and seyde fayre knyght a byde and suffir me to do you the thankynges

for much haue ye done for me But euer Sir Galahad rode fast

that at the last he past oute of hys syght And as fast as Sir

Percyvale myght he wente aftir hym on foote cryyng And Þan

he mette with a yoman rydyng vppon an hakeney which lad

in hys ryght honde a grete steede blacker than ony beare / A

fayre frende seyde Sir Percyvale as euer y may do for you and

to be youre knyght in the first place ye woll requyre me Þat ye woll

lende me that black steed that I myght ouer take a knyght which

be fore me // Sir seyde the yoman that may I nat do for the horse is

such a mannys horse that he wolde sle me // Alas seyde Sir Percivale

I had neuer so grete sorow as I haue for losyng of yondir knyght

Sir seyde the yoman I am ryght hevy for you for a good horse

wolde be seme you well but I dare nat delyuer you thys horse but

if ye wolde take hym frome me // That woll I nat seyde sir Per//

civale and so they departed and Sir Percivale sette hym downe vnder

a tre and made sorow oute of mesure And as he sate Þer cam a

knyght rydynge on the horse that the yoman lad and he was

clene armyd // And anone the yoman com rydynge & pryckyng

aftir as fast as he myght and asked Sir Percivale if he saw ony

knyght rydyng on hys blacke steede // ye Sir for sothe // why aske

ye me Sir A Sir that steede he hath be nomme me with strengthe

where fore my lorde woll sle me in what place som euer he fyndith

 

f. 367v (XIV.5)

 

me well seyde Sir Percyvale what woldist Þou that I ded Þou seest

well that I am on foote But and I had a good horse I sholde soone

brynge hym a gayne // Sir seyde the yoman take my hakeney and do

the beste ye can and I shall sew you on foote to wete how that ye shall

spede // Than Sir Percivale be strode the hakeney and rode as faste os

he myght and at the last he saw that knyght And Þan he cryde

knyght turne a gayne and he turned and set hys speare ayenst sir

Percivale and he smote the hackeney in myddis the breste Þat he felle

downe to the erthe and there he had a grete falle and the oÞer rode

hys way And than Sir Percivale was wood wrothe and cryed a

byde wycked knyght cowarde and false harted knyght turne a yen

and fyght with me on foote but he answerd nat but past on hys

way // whan Sir Percivale saw he wolde nat turne he kest a

way shylde helme and swerde and seyde now am I a verry wreche

cursed and moste vnhappy of all oÞer knyghtes So in thys sorow

there he a bode all that nyght day tyll hit was nyght And than

he was faynte and leyde hym downe and slepte tyll hit was

mydnyght And than he a waked and saw be fore hym a woman

whych seyde vnto hym right fyersely Sir Percivale what dost

you here // I do noÞer good noÞer grete Ille // If Þou wolt ensure me seyde

she that Þou wolt fulfylle my wylle whan I somon the I shall lende

the myne owne horse whych shall bere the whoÞer Þou wolt Sir

Percivale was glad of her profer and ensured hir to fulfylle all hir

desire Than a bydith me here and I shall go fecche you an horse

And so she cam sone a gayne and brought an horse with her Þat was

inly black // whan Sir Percyvale be hylde that horse he meruaylde

that he was so grete and so well apparayled And nat for Þan

he was so hardy he lepte vppon hym and toke none hede off

hym selff // And anone as he was vppon hym he threst to hym

with hys spurres and so rode by a foreste And the moone shoone

clere and with In an owre and lasse he bare hym iiij· dayes Journey

f. 368 (XIV.5-6)

 

Þense vntyll he com to a rowȝe watir whych rored and that horse

wolde haue borne hym In to hit // And whan Sir Percivale

cam nye the brymme he saw the watir so boysteous he doutted to passe

ouer hit and than he made a sygne of the crosse in hys forehed // whan

the fende felte hym so charged he shooke of Sir Percivale & he wente

in to the watir cryynge and makyng grete sorowe And hit semed

vnto hym that the watir brente // Than Sir Percivale perceyved

hit was a fynde the whych wolde haue brouȝte hym vnto perdicion

Than he commended hym selff vnto god and prayde oure lorde to

kepe hym frome all sucche temptaciouns And so he prayde all that

nyght tylle on the morne that hit was day And a none he saw he

was in a wylde mounteyne whych was closed with Þe se nyȝe

all a boute that he myght se no londe a boute hym whych myȝte

releve hym but wylde bestes // And than he wente downe in to a

valey and there he saw a serpente brynge a yonge lyon by the necke

And so he cam by Sir Percivale So with that com a grete lyon

cryynge and romyng and aftir the serpente And as fast as Sir

Percivale saw thys he hyȝed hym thydir but the lyon had ouer take

the serpente and be gan batayle with hym // And Þan Sir Percivale

thou3t to helpe the lyon for he was the more naturall beste of Þe

ij· And there with he drew hys swerde and sette hys shylde a fore

hym And there he gaff the serpente suche a buffett that he had a

dedely wounde // whan the lyon saw that he made no sembelaunte

to fyght with hym but made hym all the chere that a beest myȝte

make aman // whan Sir Percivale perceyved hit he kyst downe his

shylde whych was brokyn and than he dud of hys helme for to

gadir wynde for he was gretly chaffed with the serpente & the lyon

wente all wey a boute hym fawnynge as a spaynell & Þan he stroked

hym on the necke and on the sholdirs and thanked god of the

feliship of that beste And a boute noone the lyon toke hys lityll

 

f. 368v (XIV.6-7)

 

whelpe and trussed hym and bare hym there he com fro Than was

Sir Percivale a lone And as the tale tellith he was at that tyme

one of the men of the worlde whych moste be leved in oure lorde

ihu cryste for in Þo dayes there was but fewe folkes at Þat tyme that

be leved parfitely For In Þo dayes the sonne spared nat the fadir no

more than a straunger and so Sir Percivale comforted hym selff

in oure lorde Jhu and be souȝt hym that no temptacion sholde

brynge hym oute of goddys seruys but to endure as his trew cham

pyon // Thus whan Sir Percyvale had preyde he saw the lyon

com towarde hym and cowched down ht his feet And so all

that nyght the lyon and he slepte to gydirs And whan Sir

Percivale slepte he dremed a meruaylous dreme Þat ij· ladyes mette with

hym and that one sate vppon a lyon and that oÞer sate vppon a serpente

And that one of hem was yonge and that oÞer was olde & Þe yongist

hym thouȝt seyde Sir Percyvale my lorde salewith and sende Þe worde

Þou aray the and make the redy for to morne Þou muste fyght with

the stronge champion of the worlde // And if Þou be ouer com Þou

shalt nat be quytte for losyng of ony of thy membrys but Þou

shalt be shamed for euer to the worldis ende And Þan he asked her

what was hir lorde and she seyde the grettist lorde of the worlde

And so she departed suddeynly that he wyst nat where // Than

com forth·  the tothir lady that rode vppon the serpente And she

seyde Sir Percivale I playne vnto you of that ye haue done vnto

me and I haue nat offended vnto you // Sertes madam seyde

he vnto you nor no lady I neuer offended // yes seyde she I shall

sey you why I haue norysshed in thys place a grete whyle a

serpente whych pleased me much· and yestirday ye slew hym

as he gate hys pray // Sey me for what cause ye slew hym

for the lyon was nat youres // Madam I know well the lyon

was nat myne But for the lyon ys more of Jantiller nature

 

f. 369 (XIV.7)

 

than the serpente there fore I slew hym and me semyth I dud nat

a mysse a gaynst you madam seyde he // what wolde ye Þat I dud

I wolde seyde she for the amendis of my beste that ye be cam my

man And than he answerde and seyde that woll I nat graunte

you No seyde she truly ye were neuer but my seruaunte syn ye res/

seyved the omayge of oure lorde Jhu cryste There fore a I you ensure

in what place that I may fynde you with oute kepyng I shall take

you as he that som tyme was my man And so she departed fro

Sir Percivale and leffte hym slepynge whych was sore travayled

of hys avision And on the morne he arose and blyssed hym &

he was passynge fyeble // Than was Sir Percivale ware in

the see where com a shippe saylyng toward hym And sir Perci//

vale wente vnto the ship and founde hit couerde with In & with oute

with whyght Samyte And at the helme stoode an olde man

clothed in a Surplyse in lyknes of a pryste // Sir seyde sir Percivale

ye be well com God kepe you seyde the good man & of whense

be ye // Sir I am of kynge Arthurs courte and a knyght of the

rounde table whych am in the queste of the Sankgreall and

here I am in grete duras and neuer lyke to ascape oute of thys

wyldernes Doute ye nat seyde the good man and ye be so trew

a knyght as the order of shevalry requyrith And of herte as

ye ought to be ye shold nat doute that none enemy shold slay

you // what ar ye seyde Sir Percyvale Sir I am of a strange

contrey and hydir I com to comforte you // Sir seyde sir Percivale

what signifieth my dreme that I dremed thys nyght And Þer

he tolde hym all to gydir // She which rode vppon the lyon

hit be tokenyth the new law of holy chirche that Is to vndir//

stonde fayth good hope be lyeve and baptyme for she semed

yonger that othir hit ys grete reson for she was borne in the

 

f. 369v (XIV.7-8)

 

resurreccion and the passion of oure lorde Jhu cryste And for grete

love she cam to the to warne the of thy grete batayle that shall be

falle the // with whom seyde Sir Percivale shall I fyght with Þe moste

douteful· champion of the worlde for as the lady seyde but if Þou

quyte the welle Þou shalt nat be quytte by losyng of one membir

but Þou shalt be shamed to the worldis ende And she that rode on

the serpente signifieth the olde law and that serpente betokenyth a

devyll that Þou rodist on to the roche And whan Þou madist

a sygne of the crosse there Þou slewyst hym and put a way

hys power And whan she asked the amendis and to be com

hir man Than Þou saydist nay That was to make the be leve

on her and leve thy baptym // So he commaunded sir Percivale

to departe and so he lepte ouer the boorde And the shippe and all

wente a way he wyste nat whydir // Than he wente vp in to

the roche and founde the lyon whych all way bare hym fely//

ship and he stroked hym vppon the backe and had grete Joy of

hym Bi that Sir Percivale had byddyn there tyll mydday he saw

a shippe com saylyng in the see as all the wynde of the worlde

had dryven hit and so hit londid vndir that rocche And whan

Sir Percivale saw thys he hyȝed hym thydir and founde the

shippe couerde with sylke more blacker than ony beare and there In

was a Jantill woman of grete beaute and she was clothe rychly

there myght be none bettir // And whan she saw Sir Percivale

she asked hym who brought hym in to thys wyldernesse where

ye be neuer lyke to passe hense for ye shall dye here for hunger

and myscheff Damesell seyde Sir Percivale I serve Þe beste

man of the worlde and in hys seruyse he woll nat suffir me

 

f. 370 (XIV.8)

 

to dye For who that knowith shall entir and who that askyth

shall haue And who that sekith hym he hydyth hym not vnto

hys wordys // But than she seyde Sir Percivale wete ye what I

am // who taught you my name now seyde Sir Percivale I know

you bettir than ye wene I com but late oute of the waste foreystes

where I founde the rede knyght with the whyȝte shylde A fayre

damesell seyde he that knyght wolde I fayne mete with all Sir

knyght seyde she and ye woll ensure me by the fayth that ye owȝe

vnto knyghthode that ye shall do my wyll what tyme I somon

you and I shall brynge you vnto that knyght // yes he seyde I shall

promyse you to full fylle youre desyre // well seyde she now shall

I telle you I saw hym in the waste foreyste chasyng ij· knyghtes

vnto the watir whych ys callede Mortayse and they drove in to

that watir for drede of dethe and the ij· knyghtes passed ouer & Þe rede

knyght passed aftir and there hys horse was drowned and he

thorow grete strengthe ascaped vnto the londe thus she tolde hym

And Sir Percivale was passynge glad Þer off // Than she asked hym

if he had ete ony mete late // Nay madam truly I yeete no mete

nyȝe thes iij· dayes but late here I spake with a good man that

fedde me with hys good wordys and refreyshed me gretly // A Sir

knyght that same man seyde she ys an inchaunter & a multiplier

of wordis For and ye belyve hym ye shall be playnly shamed

and dye in thys roche for pure hunger and be etyn with wylde

bestis and ye be a yonge man and a goodly knyght & I shall

helpe you and ye woll // what ar ye seyde Sir Percivale Þat

proferyth me Þus so grete kyndenesse I am seyde she a Jantill

woman that am discryte whyche was the rychest woman of

the worlde Damesell seyde Sir Percivale who hath disheryte

you for I haue grete pite of you // Sir seyde she I dwelle^th with the


f. 370v (XIV.8-9)

 

grettist man of the worlde and he made me so fayre and so clere Þat

there was none lyke me And of that grete beawte I had a litill

pryde more than I ouȝte to haue had Also I sayde a worde Þat plesed

hym nat And than he wolde nat suffir me to be no lenger in Þer

company And so he drove me frome myne herytayge & dishe//

ryted me for euer and he had neuer pite of me noÞer of none of my

counceyle noÞer of my courte And sitthyn Sir knyght hit hath

be fallyn me to be so ouer Þrowyn & all myne yet I haue be nomme

hym som of hys men and made hem to be com my men for Þey

aske neuer nothynge of me but I gyff hem that and much more

Thus I and my seruauntes were a yenste hym nyght and day Þer

fore I know no good knyght nor no good man but I gete hem on

my syde and I may And for that I know that ye ar a good knyȝt

I be seche you to helpe me and for ye be a felowe of the rounde

table where fore ye ouȝt nat to fayle no Jantill woman which

ys disherite and she be souȝt you of helpe // Than Sir Percivale

pmysed her all the helpe that he myght and than she thanked

hym And at that tyme the wedir was hote Than she called

vnto her a Jantill woman and bade hir brynge forth a pavilion

and so she ded and pyȝte hit vppon the gravell // Sir seyde she now

may ye reste you in thys hete of thys day Than he thanked her

and she put of hys helme and hys shylde and there he slepte a

grete whyle and so he a woke and asked her if she had ony

mete and she seyde yee so shall haue I nowȝe And anone Þer was

leyde a table and so muche meete was sette Þer on Þat he had meruayle

for there was all maner of meetes that he cowde thynke on Also

he dranke there the strengyst wyne that euer he dranke hym

thouȝt and there with he was chaffett a lityll more Þan he

ouȝte to be with that he be hylde that Jantilwoman & hym Þouȝt

f. 371 (XIV.9-10)

she was the fayryst creature that euer she saw // And Þan sir Percivale

profird hir love and prayde hir that she wolde be hys Than she re//

fused hym in a maner whan he requyred her for cause he sholde

be the more ardente on hir and euer he sesed nat to pray hir of

love And whan she saw hym well enchaffed than she seyde Sir

Percivale wyte Þou well I shall nat fulfylle youre wylle but if

ye swere frome hense forthe ye shall be my trew seruaunte And to

be no thynge but that I shall commaunde you // woll ye ensure me

thys as ye be a trew knyght // yee seyde he fayre lady by Þe feythe

of my body // well seyde she now shall ye do with me what ye wyll

and now wyte you well ye ar the knyght in the worlde Þat I haue

moste desyre to And than ij squyres were commaund to make a

bedde in myddis of the pavelon and anone she was vnclothed

and leyde Þer In // And Þan Sir Percivale layde hym downe by her

naked and by aduenture and grace he saw hys swerde by on Þe

erthe nake where in the pomell was a rede crosse and the sygne

of the crucifixe In In and be thought hym on hys knyghthode

and hys promyse made vnto the good man to forne hande And

than he made a sygne in the forehed of hys and Þer with Þe pavy//

lon turned vp so downe and Þan hit chonged vnto a smooke

and a blak clowde And than he drad sore and cryed a lowde

fayre swete lorde Jhu cryste ne lette me nat be shamed which

was nyȝe loste had nat thy good grace bene And Þan he loked

vnto her shippe and saw her entir Þer In which seyde Syr

Percivale ye haue be trayde me and so she wente with Þe wynde

rorynge and yellynge that hit semed all the water brente after

her // Than Sir Percivale made grete sorow and drew hys

swerde vnto hym and seyde sitthyn my fleyssh woll be my

mayster I shall punyssh hit & Þer with he rooff hym selff thorow Þe

 

f. 371v (XIV.10-XV.1)

 

the thygh that the blood sterte a boute hym And seyde a good lord take

thys in recompensacion of that I haue mysse done ayenste the lorde //

So than he clothed hym and armed hym and called hym self wrecche

of all wrecchis how nyȝe I was loste And to haue lost that I sholde

neuer have gotyn a gayne that was my virginite for Þat may neuer be

recouerde aftir hit ys onys loste and than he stopped hys bledyng wound

with a pece of hys sherte //Thus as he made hys mone he saw the

sh same shippe com fro the oryente that the good man was In Þe day

be fore And thys noble knyght was sore a shamed of hym selff & Þer

with he fylle in a sowne And whan he a wooke he wente vnto hym

waykely and there he salewed the good man // And Þan he asked sir

Percivale how haste Þou done syth I departed // Sir seyde here was a Jan//

till woman and ledde In to dedly synne and Þer he tolde hym all to gidirs

knew ye nat that mayde seyde the good man // Sir seyde he nay but

well I wote the fynde sente hir hydir to shame me A good knyght

seyde he Þou arte a foole for that Jantill woman was the mayster

fyende of helle which hath pouste ouer all oÞer devyllis and Þat was Þe

olde lady that Þou saw in thyne avision rydyng on Þe serpente //

Than he tolde sir Percivale how oure lorde Jhu cryste bete hym oute

of hevyn for hys synne whycch was the moste bryghtist angell

of hevyn and there fore he loste hys Heritaige and that was Þe cham//

pion that Þou fouȝt with all whych had ouer com the had nat Þe grace

of god bene // Now Sir Percivale be ware and take this for an Insam//

ple And than the good man vanysshed Than Sir Percivale toke

hys armys and entirde in to the shippe & so he departed from Þens//

So levith thys tale and turnyth vnto Sir Launcelot·

Whan the Eremyte had kepte Sir Launcelot iij· dayes Þan

the Eremyte gate hym an horse a helme and a swerde and

than he departed vntyll the owre of none And than he saw a litill horse

And whan he cam nere he saw a lityll chapell And there be syde

he sye an olde man which was clothed all in whyght full rychely

 

f. 372 (XV.1-2)

 

And than Sir Launcelot seyde Sir god save you // Sir god kepe you seyde

the good man and make you a good knyght // Than Sir Launcelot a lyȝt

and entird in to the chapell and there he saw an olde man ded & in a

whyght sheete of passyng fyne clothe Sir seyde the good man Þe man

ought nat to be in such clothynge as ye se hym In for in that he brake

the othe of hys order For he hath bene more than an C· wynter a man

of Religious And than the good man and Sir Launcelot & Þe good man

toke a stole a boute hys neck and a booke and than he conioured on that

booke And with that they saw the fyende in an hydeous fygure Þat

there was no man so harde herted in the worlde but he sholde a bene

a ferde // Than seyde the fyende Þou haste travayle me gretly now

telle me what Þou wolte with me I woll seyde the good man that

Þou telle me how my brothir be cam dede and wheÞer he be saved or

dampned // Than he seyde with an horrible voice he ys nat lost but

he ys savd // How may that be seyde the good man Hit semyth me

that he levith nat well for he brake hys order for to were A sherte

where he ouȝt to were none And who that trespassith a yenst oure

doth nat well Nat so syde the fyende thys man that lyeth here was

com of grete lynage and Þer was a lorde that hyȝt Þe Erle de vale Þat

hylde grete warre a yenste thys mannes nevew which hyȝt Agvaurs

And so thys Agvaurs saw the Erle was bygger than he // Than he

wente for to take counceyle of hys vncle which lyeth ded here And

than he wente oute of hys Ermytaige for to maynteyne his nevew

a yenste the myghty erle and so hit happed that thys man Þat lyeth

dede ded so muche by hys wyse dom & hardiness that Þe erle was

take and iij· of hys lordys by force of thys dede man // Than was

Þer pees be twyxte thys erle and thys Agvaurs and grete surete

that the erle sholde neuer warre a gaynste hym more Than Þis dede

man that here lyeth cam to thys Ermytayge a gayne And Þan

the erle made ij of hys nevews for to be a venged vppon Þis man

So they cam on a day and founde thys dede man at Þe sakerynge


f. 372v (XV.2)

 

of hys masse and they a bode hym tyll he had seyde masse and Þan they

lette vppon hym and drew oute Þer swerdys to haue slayne hym but Þer

wolde no swerde byȝte on hym more than vppon a gadde of steele for

the hyȝe lorde whiche he serued he hym preserued // Than made they

a grete fyre and dud of all hys clothys and the heyre of hys backe

And than thys dede man Ermyte seyde vnto them wene ye to bren

them me hit shall nat lyȝe in youre power noÞer to perish· me as

much· as a threde And there were ony on my body // No seyde one

of them hit shall be assayde and than they dispoyled hym And put

vppon hym hys sherte and kyste hym in a fayre and there he lay

all that day tyll hit was nyght in that fyre and was nat dede

And so in the morne than com I and founde hym dede but I founde

noyÞer threde nor skynne tamed So toke they hym oute of the fyre

with grete feare and leyde hym here as ye may se // And now may ye

suffir me to go my way for I haue seyde you the sothe And Þan he

departed with a grete tempest Than was the good man & sir Launclot

more gladder than they were to fore And than Sir Launcelot dwel//

led with that good man that nyght Sir seyde the good man be ye

nat Sir Launcelot du lake ye Sir seyde he // Sir what seke you in

thys contrey // I go sir to seke the aduentures of the Sankgreall

well seyde he seke ye hit ye may well // But Þouȝe hit were here

ye shall haue no power to se hit no more than a blynde man Þat

sholde se a bryght swerde and that ys longe on youre synne and

ellys ye were more abeler than ony man lyvynge And Þan Sir

Launcelot be gan to wepe Than seyde the good man were ye confessed

synce ye entred in to the queste of the Sankgreall // ye sir seyde Sir

Launcelot Than vppon the morne whan the good man had songe

hys masse than they buryed the dede man // Now seyde sir Launclot

fadir what shall I do Now seyde the good man I requyre you take

thys hayre that was thys holy mannes and put hit nexte thy

skynne And hit shall prevayle the gretly // Sir than woll I do hit

seyde Sir Launcelot also sir I charge the Þat Þou ete no fleysshe as

longe as ye be in the queste of Sankgreall noÞer ye shall drynke no

 

 

 

                                                                        wyne


f. 373 (XV.2-3)

 

wyne and that ye hyre masse dayly and ye may com Þer to So he toke Þe

hayre and put hit vppon hym and so departed at evynsonge and so

rode in to a foreyste and there he mette with a Jantill woman rydyng

vppon a whyght palferey And Þan she asked hym sir knyght whoÞer

ryde ye // Sertes damesell seyde Sir Launcelot I wote nat whothir

I ryde but as fortune ledith me // A Sir Launcelot seyde she I wote

what aduenture ye seke for ye were be fore tyme nerar than ye be

now and yet shall ye se hit more opynly than euer ye dud and Þat

shall ye vndirstonde in shorte tyme // Than Sir Launcelot asked

her where he myght be harberowde that nyght ye shall none fynde

thys day nor nyght bute to morne ye shall fynde herberow goode

and ease of that ye bene in doute off and Þan he commended hir vnto

god And so he rode tylle that he cam to a crosse and toke Þat for

hys oste as for that nyght // And so he put hys horse to pasture and

ded of hys helme and hys shylde and made hys prayers vnto Þe crosse      

that he neuer falle in dedely synne a gayne and so he leyde hym                 

downe to slepe And anone as he was on slepe hit be fylle hym Þer                 

a vision That Þer com a man a fore hym all by compast with sterris

and that man had a crowne of golde on hys hede and Þat man lad

in hys felyship vij· kynges and ij knyghtes and all thes worshipt

the crosse knelyng vppon Þer kneys holdyng vp Þer hondys towarde

the hevyn Amd all they seyde swete fadir of hevyn com and visite

vs and yelde vnto euerych of vs as we haue deserued // Than loked

Sir Launcelot vp to the hevyn and hym semed the clowdis ded opyn

and an olde man com downe with a company of angels & a lyȝte

a monge them and gaff vnto euerych hys blyssynge & called Þem

hys hys servauntes and hys good and trew knyghtes And whan

thys olde man had seyde thus he com to one of the knyghtes and

seyde I haue loste all that I haue be sette in the for Þou hast

ruled the a yenste me as a warryoure and vsed wronge warres

with vayne glory for the pleasure of the worlde more Þan to please


f. 373v (XV.3-4)

 

me Þere fore Þou shalt be confounded with oute Þou yelde me my tresoure

All thys avision saw Sir Launcelot at the crosse and on the morne he

toke hys horse and rode tylle mydday // And there by aduenture he mette

the same knyght that toke hys horse helme and hys swerde whan he

slepte whan the Sankgreall appered a fore the crosse // So whan sir Launclot

saw hym he salewede hym nat fayre but cryed on hyght knyght kepe

the for Þou deddist me grete vnkyndnes And than they put a fore

them Þer spearys And Sir Launcelot com so fyersely that he smote

hym and hys horse downe to the erthe that he had nyȝe brokyn

hys neck Than Sir Launcelot toke the knyghtes horse Þat was hys

owne be fore honde and descended frome the horse he sate vppon

and mownted vppon hys horse And tyed the knyghtes owne horse

to a tre that he myght fynde that horse whan he was rysen //

Than Sir Launcelot rode tylle nyght and by aduenture he mette

an Ermyte and eche of hem salewd oÞer and there he reste with Þat

good man all nyght and gaff hys horse suche as he myght gete

Than seyde the good man vnto Sir Launcelot of whens be ye Sir

seyde he I am of Arthurs courte and my name ys Sir Launcelot

de lake that am in the queste of the Sankegreall and Þer for sir I pray

you counceile me of a vision that I saw thys nyght and so he tolde

hem all / Lo Sir Launcelot seyde the good man Þere myght Þou

vndirstonde the hyȝe lynayge that Þou arte com off at thyne avi//

sion be tokenyth aftir the passion of Jhu cryste fourty yere Joseph

of Aramathy preched of the victory of kynge Euelake that he had

in hys batayles the bettir of hys enemyes and of the vij kynges

and the ij knyghtes the firste of hem ys called Nappus an holy

man And the secunde hyght Nacien in Remembraunce of hys

graunte syre And in hym dwelled oure lorde Jhu cryst And Þe

third was called Hellyas le grose and the iiij· hyght Lysays

And the v· hyght Jonas he departed oute of hys contrey & wente

in to Walis and toke there the douȝter of Manuell where by


f. 374 (XV.4-5)

 

he had the londe Gaule and he com to dwelle in thys contrey And

of hym com kynge Launcelot thy graunte syre shych were wedded

to the kynges douȝter of Irelonde and he was as worthy a man as

Þou arte And of hym cam kynge Ban the fadir whych was the

laste of the vij· kynges And by the Sir Launcelot hit signyfieth Þat Þe

angels seyde Þou were none of the vij· felysship // And Þe last was

the ix knyght he was signyfyed to a lyon for he sholde passe all

maner of erthely knyghtes that ys Sir Galahad whych Þou gate

on kynge Pelles doughter and Þou ouȝt to thanke god more Þan

ony othir man lyvyng for of a Synner erthley Þou hast no pere

as in knyghthode noÞer neuer shall haue But lytyll thanke hast Þou

yevyn to god for all the grete vertuys that god hath lente the Sir

seyde Sir Launcelot ye sey that good knyght ye my sonne That ouȝt

Þou to know seyde the good man for Þou knew Þe douȝter of kyng

Pelles fleyshly and on her Þou be gatist Sir Galahad and that

was he that at the feste of Pentecoste sate in the Syge perelous

and there fore make Þou hit to be knowyn opynly that he ys of

thy be getyn and in no place prees nat vppon hym to haue a do

with hym for hit woll nat a vayle no knyght to have a do with

hym // well seyde Sir Launcelot me semyth that good knyght shold

pray for me vnto the hyȝe fadir that I shall nat to synne a gayne

Truste Þou well seyde the good man Þou faryst muche the better

for hys prayer for the sonne shall nat beare the wyckednesse

of the sonne but euery man shall beare hys owne burden And

Þer fore be seke Þou duly god and he woll helpe the in all thy nedes

And than Sir Launcelot and he wente to supere and so leyde

hem to reste And hys heyre prycked faste and greved hym sore

but he toke hyt mekely and suffirde the payne And so on the

morne he harde hys masse and toke hys armys and so toke

hys leve and mownted vppon hys horse and rode in to a foreyst


f. 374v (XV.5)

 

and helde no hyȝe way and as he loked be fore hym he sye a fayre

playne and be syde that a fayre castell and be fore the castell were

many pavelons of sylke and of dyuerse how And hym semed that he

saw there v·C knyghtes rydynge on horse backe and there was ij partyes

they that were of the castell were all on black horsys and Þer trappoures

black and they that were with oute were all on whyght horsis & trappers

So there be gan a grete turnemete and euery hurteled wither Þat hit mer//

vayled Sir Launcelot gretly And at the laste hym thouȝt they of Þe

castell were putt to the wars // Than thouȝt Sir Launcelot for to

helpe there the wayker party in Incresyng of hys shevalry // And so sir

Launcelot threste In amonge the party of the castell and smote downe

a knyght horse and man to the erthe And than he russhed here and

there and ded many meruaylous dedis of armys And than he drew

oute hys swerde and strake many knyghtes to the erth that all that

saw hym mervayled that euer one knyght myght do so grete dedis

of armys // But all wayes the whyght knyghtes hylde them

nyȝe a boute Sir Launcelot for to tire hym and wynde hym &

at the laste Sir Launcelot was so wery of hys grete dedis that

he myght nat lyffte vp hys armys for to gyff one stroke Þat he

wente neuer to haue borne armys // And than they all toke and

ledde hym a way in to a foreyste and there made hym to a lyȝt

to reeste hym And than all the felyship of the castell were

ouer com for the defauȝte of hym Than they seyd all vnto Sir

Launcelot blessed be god that ye be now of oure felyship For

we shall holde you in oure preson and so they leffte hym with

few wordys // And than Sir Launcelot made grete sorowe

for neuer or now was I neuer at turnemente nor at Justes but

I had the beste and now I am shamed and am sure that I am

more synfuller than euer I was thus he rode sorowyng & halff


f. 375 (XV.5-6)

 

a day oute of dispayre tyll that he cam in to a depe valey And

whan Sir Launcelot sye he myght nat ryde vp vnto Þe moun//

tayne he there a lyȝt vndir an appyll tre and there he leffte

hys helme and hys shylde and put hys horse vnto pasture

And than he leyde hym downe to slepe And Þan hym thouȝt Þer

com an olde man a fore hym whych seyde A· Launcelot of evill

wycked fayth and poore be leve // where fore ys thy wyll turned so

lyghtly toward dedly synne and whan he had seyde thus he

vanysshed a way And Sir Launcelot wyst nat where he be

com // Than he toke hys horse and armed hym and as he rode

by the hyȝe way he saw a chapell where was a recluse which

had a wyndow that she myȝt se vp to the awter And all a boute

she called Sir Launcelot for that he semed a knyght arraunte

And Þan he cam and she asked hym what he was & of what

place and where a boute he wente to seke And Þan he tolde

hir all to gydir worde by worde and the trouth how hit be felle

hym at the turnemente and aftir that he tolde hir hys a//

vision that he had that nyght in hys slepe A Launcelot seyde

she as longe as ye were knyght of erthly knyghthode ye were

Þe moste mervayloust man of the worlde & moste aduenturest

Now seyde the lady sitthen ye be sette amonge the knyghtis

of hevynly aduentures if aventure falle hit haue ye no mer//

uayle for that turnamente yestirday was but a tokenynge

of oure lorde and nat fore than there was none enchaunte//

mente for they at the turnemente were erthely knyghtes

The turnamente was tokyn to se who sholde haue moste

knyghtes of Cliaȝar the sonne of kynge pelles or Argustus

the sonne of kynge Harlon But Cliaȝar was all clothed


f. 375v (XV.6)

 

in whyght And Argustus were couerde in blacke // and what thys

be tokenyth I shall telle you the day of pentecoste whan kynge

Arthure hylde courte hit be felle that erthyl erthely kynges &

erthely knyghtes toke a turnemente to gydirs that ys to sey the

queste of the Sankgreall Of thes erthely knyghtes which were

clothed all in whyght blake and the coueryng be tokenyth the

sygnes where of they be nat confessed And they with the couerynge

of whyght betokenyth virginite and they that hath chosyn chas//

tite and thus was the queste be gonne in them Than Þou  be helde

the synners and the good men And whan Þou saw Þe synners

ouer com Þo enclyned to that party for bobbaunce and pryde of Þe

worlde pryde of the worlde and all that muste be leffte in that

queste for in thys queste Þou shalt haue many felowis & thy

bettirs for Þou arte so feble of evyll truste & good beleve thys

made hit whan Þou were where they toke the and ladde Þe in to

the foreyste And anone Þer appered the Sankgreall vnto the

whyght knyghtes but Þou were so fyelbe of good fayth Þat Þou myȝt

nat a byde hit for all the techyng of the good man be fore but

a none Þou turned to the synners And that caused thy mysse//

aventure Þat Þou sholde know god frome vayne glory of the

worlde hit ys nat worth a peare and for grete pryde Þou madist

grete sorow Þat Þou haddist nat ouer com all the whyȝt knyghtes

there fore god was wrothe with you for in thys queste god lo//

vith no such dedis and that made the avision to say to Þe that

Þou were of evyll faythe and of poore by lyeve the which woll

make the depe pitte of helle if Þou kepe the nat the better // Now

haue I warned the of thy vayne glory and of thy pryde that

Þou haste many tyme arred a yenste thy maker be ware of 


f. 376 (XV.6-XVI.1)

 

euer lastynge payne for of all erthly knyghtes I haue moste pite

of the for I know well Þou haste nat thy pere of ony erthly syn//

full man And so she commaunded Sir Launcelot to dyner and

aftir dyner he toke hys horse and commaunde her to god and

so rode in to a depe valey and there he saw a ryver and an

hyȝe mortays and thorow the watir he muste nedis passe Þe

whych was hedyous And than in the name of god he toke

hit wit good herte and whan he com ouer he saw An armed

knyght horse and man all black as a beare with oute ony

worde he smote Sir Launcelottis horse to the dethe and so he

paste on and wyst nat where he was be com And Þan he

toke hys helme and hys shylde and thanked god of hys adven//

ture  Here levith Þe tale of Sir Launcelot & spekith of sir Launclot

Whan Sir Gawayne was departed frome hys felyship

he rode longe with oute ony aduenture for he founde

nat the tenthe parte of aventures as they were wonte to haue

For Sir Gawayne rode frome whytsontyde tylle Mychaell/

masse and founde neuer aduenture that pleased hym So on

a day hit be felle that Gawayne mette with Sir Ector de mars

and aythir made grete Joy of othir and so they tolde eueryche

othir and complayned them gretely that they coude fynde none

aduenture // Truly seyde Sir Gawayne I am ny wery of thys

queste and lothe I am to folow furÞer in straunge contreyes

One thynge mervaylith me muche seyde Sir Ector I haue mette

with xxti knyghtes that be felowys of myne And all Þey complayne

as I do // I haue mervayle seyd Sir Gawayne where that Sir

Launcelot you brothir ys Truly seyde Sir Ector I can nat hyre

of hym noÞer of Sir Galahad Sir Percivale and Sir Bors // lette

hem be seyde seyde Sir Gawayne for they iiij· haue no peerys

 

f. 376v (XVI.1-2)

 

and if one thynge were nat Sir Launcelot he had none felow of an

erthely man but he ys as we be but if he take the more payne

vppon hym but and thes iiij be mette to gydyrs they woll be lothe

that ony man mete with hem for and they fayle of Sankgre

all hit ys in waste of all the remenaunte to recouer hit Thus

Sir Ector and Sir Gawayne rode more than viij dayes And on

a Satirday they founde an auncyant chapell which was

wasted that Þer semed no man nor woman thydir repayred

and there they a lyght and sette Þer sperys at the dore and so

they entirde in to the chapell and Þer made Þer orysons a grete

whyle And than they sette hem downe in the Segys of the

chapell and as they spake of one thynge and of othir for hevy//

nesse they felle on slepe and there hem bothe mervaylous ad//

uentures // Sir Gawayne hym semed he cam Into a medow

full of herbis and floures and there he saw a rake of bullis

an hundrith and fyffty that were proude and black save iij of

hem was all whyght and one had a blacke spotte And Þe

othir ij were so fayre and so whyght that they myght be no

whytter and thes iij bullis which were so fayre were tyed with

ij stronge cordis and the remenaunte of the bullis seide amonge

them go we hens to seke bettir pasture and so som wente &     

som com a gayne but they were so megir that the myȝt nat  

stonde vp ryght and of the bullys that were so whyght Þat one               

com a gayne and no mo // But whan thys whyght bulle was

com a gayne and amonge thes oÞer there rose vp a grete crye

for lacke of wynde fayled them and so they departed one here &

a nothir there thys avision be felle Sir Gawayne that nyȝt

But to Sir Ector de mares be felle a noÞer avision Þe contrary

For hit semed hym that hys brothir Sir Launcelot and he


f. 377 (XVI.2)

 

a lyȝt oute of a chayre and a lepte vppon ij horsis and Þe one syde

to the othir Go we to seke that we shall nat fynde and hym Þouȝt

thatt a man bete Sr Launcelot and dispoyled hym & clothed

hym in a noÞer aray whych all fulle of knottis and sette hym

vppon an asse and so he rode tylle that he cam vnto Þe fayryst

foreste welle that euer he saw And there sir Launcelot a lyȝt

and dranke of that welle annd whan he stowped to drynke of

that watir the watir sanke frome hym And whan sir Launclot

saw that he turned and wente thidir as the hede com fro // And

in the meane whyle he trowed that hym self and Sir Ector

rode tylle that they com to a ryche mannes  house where Þer was

a weddyntge and there he saw kynge whyche seyd sir knyght

here ys no place for you and than he turned a gayne vnto

the chayre that he cam fro And so with In a whyle both sir

Gawayne and Sir Ector a waked and ayÞer tolde oÞer of Þer avision

whych mervayled hem gretly Truly seyde sir Ector I shall

neuer be myrry tyll I hyre tydynges of my brothyr Sir Launclot

So as they sate thus talkynge they saw an honde shewynge

vnto the elbow and was couerde with rede samyte And vppon

that a brydill nat ryȝt ryche that hylde with In the fyste

a grete candill whych brenned ryght clere and so passed

be fore thm and entird in to the chapell and Þan vanyshed

a way they wyste nat whydir And anone com downe a

voice which seyde knyghtes full of evyll fayth and of poore

be leve thes ij thynges have fayled you and Þer fore ye may

nat com to the aventures of the Sankgreall Than first

spake Sir Gawayne and seyde Sir Ector haue ye herde

thes wordys // ye truly seyde Sir Ector I herde all Now


f. 377v (XVI.2)

 

go we seyde sir Ector vnto som Ermyte that woll telle vs of oure avision

for hit semyth· me we laboure all in waste and so they departe and rode

in to a valey a there they mette with a squyre which rode on an

hakeney and a none they salew hym fayre // Sir seyde Sir Gawayne

can Þou teche vs to ony Ermyte // Sir here ys on in a litill mowtayne

but hit ys so rowȝe there may no horse go thydir and Þer fore ye muste

go on foote and there ye shall fynde a poore house And Þer In ys Na//

cien Ermyte whych· ys the holyeste man in thys contrey and so they

departed aythir frome othir And than In a valey they mette with a

knyght all armed which profirde hem to fyght & Juste as sone as

he saw them In the name of god seyde Gawayne for sitthyn I

departed frome Camelot there was none that profirde me to Juste

but onys and now // Sir seyde Sir Ector lat me Juste with hym·

Nay ye shall nat but if I be betyn hit shall nat Þan fer thynke

me if ye go to hym and than aythir enbraced oÞer to Juste and so

they cam to gydirs as faste as they myght renne that Þey braste

Þer shyldis and mayles and Þat one more than Þe toÞ But sir Gaw//

ayne was wounded in the lyffte syde and thys oÞer knyght was

smytten thorow the breste that the speare com oute on Þater syde &

so they felle bothe oute of Þer sadyls and in the fallynge Þey brake

both Þer spearys And a none Sir Gawayne a rose and sette hys

honde to hys swerde and caste hys shylde be fore hym But all

for naught was hit for the knyght had no power to aryse a gayne

hym // Than seyde sir Gawayne ye muste yelde you as an ouer com

man oÞer ellis I muste sle you A sir knyght he seyde I am but dede Þer

fore for goddys sake and of youre Jantilnes lede me here vnto an

abbay that I may resceyve my creature // Sir seyde Sir Gawayn e

I know no house of religion here nyȝe // Sir sette me on an horse

to fore you and I shall teche you // So sir Gawayne sette hym vp

in the sadyll and he lepe vp be hynde hym to sustayne hym and so


f. 378 (XVI.2-3)

 

they cam to the abbay and there were well resceyved And anone he

was vnarmed and resceyve hys creature Than he prayde sir Gaw//

ayne to drawe oute the truncheon of the speare oute of hys body // Than

Sir Gawayne asked hym what he was // Sir he seyde I am of kynge

Arthurs courte and was a felow of the rounde table and we were

sworne to gydir And now sir Gawayne Þou hast slayne me and my

name ys sir vwayne le avoutres that som tyme was sone vnto                      

kynge vryen and I was in the queste of the Sankgreall and now                  

for gyff the god for hit shall be euer rehersed that the tone sworne broÞer     

hath slayne the oÞer // Alas seyde Sir Gawayne that euer thys mysad//               

venture be felle me // No force seyde sir vwayne sytthyn I shall dye this              

deth· of a much· more worshipfuller mannes hande myght I nat dye

but whan ye com to the courte recommaunde me vnto my lorde Arthur

and to all Þem that be leffte on lyve And for olde brothir hode Þynke

on me // Than be gan Sir Gawayne to wepe and also sir Ector And

than sir Vwayne bade hym draw oute the truncheon of the speare

And than Sir Gawayne drew hit oute and anone departed Þe soule

frome the body Than Sir Gawayne and sir Ector buryed hym as

them ouȝt to bury a kynges sonne and made hit wrytyn vppon hys

tombe what was hys name and by whom he was slayne // Than

departed Sir Gawayne and Sir Ector as hevy as they myght for Þer

myssaduenture and so rode they the com to the rowȝe mountayne

and there they tyed Þer horsis and wente on foote to the Ermytayge And

whan they were com vp they saw a poore house and be syde Þe chapell

a litill courtelayge // where Nacien the Ermyte gadred wortis to hys

mete as he whych had tasted none oÞer mete of a grete whyle And

whan he saw the arraunte knyghtes he cam to them and salewed

them and they hym a gayne // Fayre lordis seyde he what aduenture

brought Þou hydir Than seyde sir Gawayne to speke with you for

to be confessed // Sir seyde the Ermyte I am redy than they tolde hym

so muche that he wyste welle what they ware And Þan he thouȝt


f. 378v (XVI.3-4)

 

to counceyle them if he myght Than be gan Sir Gawayne and tolde hym

of hys avision that he had in the chapell And ector tolde hym all as hit

ys be fore reherced // Sir seyde Sir Gawayne the fayre medow & Þe rak

there In ouȝt to be vndirstonde the rounde table and by the medow

ouȝte to be vndirstonde humilite and paciens Þo be the thynges which

whych bene all wey grene and quyk for that men mowe no tyme

ouer com humilite and pacience there fore was the rounde table foun//

den and the shevalry hath ben at all tymes so hyȝe by the fraternite

which was there that she myght nat be ouercom For me seyde she

was founded in paciens and In humilite at the rack ete an C· & fyffty

bullys but they ete nat in the medowe for if they had Þer hartes sholde

haue bene sette in humilite & paciens and the bullis were proude &

blacke sauff only iij· // And by the bullys ys vndirstonde the felyshyp

of the rounde table whych for Þer synne and Þer wyckednesse bene blacke

Blackenes ys as much to sey with oute good vertues or workes And

the iij· bulles whych· were whyght sauff only one had bene spotted

The too whyght be tokenythe Sir Galahad and Sir Percivale for

they be maydyns and clene with oute sporte And the thirde Þat had a spotte

signifieth Sir Bors de gaynes which trespassed but onys in hys vir//

ginite but sithyn he lepyth hym selff so wel In chastite that all ys

for gyffyn hym and hys mysse dedys and why Þo iij were tyed by Þe

neckes they be iij· knyghtes in virginite and chastite and Þer ys no pryde

smytten in them And the blacke bullis whych seyde go we hens

they were Þo whych at pentecoste at the hyȝe feste toke vppon hem

in the queste of the Sankgreall with oute confession they myght nat

entir in the medow of humilite & paciens And there fore they turned

in to waste contreyes that signifieth dethe for Þer shall dye many off

them for euerych of them shall sle othir for synne and they Þat shall

ascape shall be so megir that hit shall be mervayle to se them and

of the iij· bullis with oute spotte the one shall com a gayne and Þeer

ij· neuer // Than spake Nacien vnto Sir Ector soth hit ys that sir Laun//


f. 379 (XVI.4)

 

celot and ye com downe of one chayre The chayer betokenyth maystership

and lordeship which ye too cam downe fro but ye ij· knyghtes sayde Þe

Ermyte ye go to seke that ye shall ^nat fynde that ys the Sankgreall·

for hit ys the secrete thynges of oure lorde Jhu cryste // But what ys

to meane that Sir Launcelot felle doune of hys horse he hath leffte

hys pryde and takyn to humilite for he hath mercy lowde for hys

synne and sore repented hym and oure lorde hath clothed hym

in hys clothynge whych ys full of knottes that ys the hayre that he

werith dayly // And the asse that he rode vppon ys a beest of humilite

for god wolde nat ryde vppon no styede noÞer vppon no palferey In an

exemple that an asse be tokenyth mekenes that Þou saw sir Launcelot

ryde in thy slepe At the welle where at the watir sanke frome hym

whan he sholde haue takyn Þer off And whan he saw he myght nat

have hit he returned from whens he cam for the welle betokenyth

the hyȝe grace of god for the more men desyre hit to take hit Þe more

shall be Þer desire // So whan he cam nyȝe the Sankgreall he meked

hym so that he hylde hym nat the man worthy to be so nyȝe Þe holy

vessell for he had be so defoyled in dedly synne by the space of many

yere yett whan he kneled downe to drynke of the welle and Þer he saw

grete prouydence of the Sankgreall and for he hath serued so longe

the devyll that he shall have iiij· & xxti dayes for that he hath bene

the devillis seruaunte iiij· & xxti yerys And Þan sone aftir he shall returne

to Camelot oute of thys contrey and he shall sey a party such thyngis

as he hath founde // Now woll I telle you what be tokenyth the hande

with the candill and the brydyll that ys to vndirstonde the holy

goste where charite ys euer And the brydyll siginfieth abstinens for

whan she ys brydeled in a crysten mannes herte So holdith hym

so shorte that he fallith nat in dedly synne And the candyll which

shewith clernesse and lyȝt signyfieth the ryght way of Jhu cryste

And whan they wente he seyde knyghtes of pore fayth & of wycked


f. 379v (XVI.4-5)

 

be leve thes iij· thynges fayled charite abstinaunce and trouthe there fore

ye may nat attayne thys aduenture of the Sankgreall Sertes seyde

sir Gawayne full sothly haue ye seyde that I se hit opynly Now I pray

you telle me why we mette nat with so many aduentures as we

were wonte to do I shall telle you gladly seyde the good man the aduen//

ture of the Sankgreall whych be in shewynge now for hit apperith

nat to no synners where fore meruayle ye nat Þou ye fayle Þer off &

many othir for ye bene an vntrew knyght and a grete murtherar

and to good men signifieth othir thynges than murthir for I dare sey

as synfull as euer Sir Launcelot hath byn sith that he wente in to

the queste of the Sankgreal he slew neuer man noÞer nouȝt shall

tylle that he com to Camelot a gayne for he hath takyn hym to for//

sake synne And nere were that he ys nat stable but by hys thouȝte

he ys lyckly to turne a gayne he sholde be nexte to enchev hit sauff

Sir Galahad hys sonne but god knowith hys thought and hys

vnstablenesse and yett shall he dye ryght an holy man and no doute

he hath no felow of none erthly synfull man lyvyng Sir seyde

sir Gawayne hit semyth me by youre wordis that for oure synnes hit

woll nat a vayle vs to travayle in thys queste Truly seyde the good

man there bene an C· such as ye bene shall neuer prevayle but to

haue shame · And whan they had herde thes wordis Þey commaun//

ded hym vnto god // Than the good man called Sir Gawayne and

seyde hit ys longe tyme passed sith that ye were made knyght and

neuer synnes seruyd Þou Þy maker and now Þou arte so olde a tre

that in the ys neythir leef nor grasse nor fruyte where fore be

thynke the Þat Þou yelde to oure lorde the bare rynde sith Þe fende hath

hath the levis and the fruyte // Sir seyde sir Gawayne and I had leyser

I wolde speke with you but my felow Sir Ector ys gone abithe

me yondir by nethe the hylle // well seyde the good man Þou were better

to be counceyled // Than departed sir Gawayne and cam to Sir Ector and


f. 380 (XVI.5-6)

 

and so toke Þer horsis and rode tylle that they com to a fosters house which

herberowde them ryght welle and on the morne departed frome hir oste

and rode longe or they cowthe fynde ony aduenture

Now turnyth thys tale vnto Syr Bors de Ganys &

Whan Sir Bors was departed frome Camelot he mette with

A religious man rydynge on an asse And a none sir Bors

salewed hym And anone the good man knew that he was one of the

knyghtes arraunte that was in the queste of the Sankgreall what

ar ye seyde the good man Sir seyde he I am a knyght that fayne wolde

be counceyled that ys entirde in to the queste of the sankgreall for he

shall haue much· erthly worship that may bryng hit to an ende

Sertes seyde the good man that ys sothe with oute fayle for he shall be

the beste knyght of the worlde and the fayryst of the felyship But wyte

you welle there shall none attayne hit but by clennes that ys pure

confession So rode they to gydir tyll that they com vnto a litill Ermy//

tayge And there he prayde Sir Bors to dwelle all that nyght And he

so put of hys armoure and prayde hym that he myȝt be confessed

And so they ete brede and dranke watir to gydir to gidir Now seyde

Þe good man I pray the Þat Þou ete none oÞer tyll Þat Þou sitte at the

table where the Sankgreal· shall be // Sir seyde he I agre me Þer to

but how know ye that I shall sytte there // yes seyde the good man Þat

know I well but there shall be but fewe of youre felowis with you

All ys well comme seyde Sir Bors that god sendith me Also seyde

the god man in steede of a shurte and in sygne of chastisemente

ye shall were a garmente here fore I pay you do of all your clothys

and youre shurte and so he dud and than he toke hym a starlet

cote so that sholde be hys in stede of hys sherte tylle he had fulfilled

the queste of the Sankegreall and thys good man founde hym in

so mervales a lyffe and so stable that he felte he was neuer gretly

correpte in fleysshly lustes but in one tyme that he be gat Elyan

le blanke Than he armyd hym and toke hym and toke hys leve &


f. 380v (XVI.6-7)

 

and so departed And so a litill frome thens he loked vp in to a tre and Þer

he saw a passynge grete birde vppon that olde tre and hit was passyng

drye with oute leyffe so she sate a bove and had birdis whiche were

ded for hungir So at the laste he smote hym selffe with hys boke which

was grete and sherpe and so the grete birde bledde so faste Þat he dyed

amonge hys birdys And the yonge birdys toke lyff by the bloode

of the grete birde // whan Sir Bors saw thys he wyste well hit

was a grete tokenynge for whan he saw the grete birde arose nat

than he toke hys horse and yode hys way And so be aventure by

evynsonge tyme he cam to a stronge towre and an hyȝe and there

was he herberowde gladly And whan he was vnarmed they lad

hym Into an hyȝe towre where was a lady yonge lusty and fayre

and she resceyved hym with grete Joy and made hym to sitte down

by her and anone he was sette to supper with fleyssh & many

deyntees // But whan Sir Bors saw that he be thouȝt hym

on hys penaunce and bade a squyre to brynge hym watir And so

he brouȝt hym and he made soppis Þer In and ete them A seyde

the lady I trow ye lyke nat youre mete yes truly seyde sir Bors

god thanke you madam but I may nat ete none oÞer mete to day

Than she spake no more as at that tyme for she was lothe to

displease hym // Than aftir supper they spake of one thynge and

of othir / So with that Þer cam a squyre and seyde madam ye muste

pirvey you to morne for a champion for ellis youre syster woll have

thys castell and also youre londys excepte ye can fynde a knyȝt

that woll fyght to morne in youre quarell a yenste Sir Prydan

le noyre Than she made grete sorow and seyde a lorde god where

fore graunted ye me to holde my londe where of I sholde now be

disherited with oute reson & ryght Andwhan Sir Bors herde

hir sey Þus he seyde I shall comforte you Sir seyde she I shall telle

you there was here a kynge that hyȝte Anyawse whych hylde

 

 

 

                                                                        all this londe

f. 381 (XVI.7-8)

all thys londe in hys kepynge So hit myssehapped he loued a Jan//

till woman a grete dele elder than I and so he toke her all Þis londe

in hir kepynge and all hys men to gouerne and she brouȝt vp many

evyll custums where by she put to dethe a grete party of hys kynnes//

men And whan he saw that he commaunded her oute of this londe

and by toke hit me and all thys londe in my demenys But a

none as that worthy kynge was dede thys oÞer lady be gan to

warre vppon me  and hath destroyed many of my men and serued

hem a yenste me that I haue well nyȝe no man leffte me and

I haue nauȝt ellis but thys hyȝe towre with with oute I can

fynde a knyght to fyght with her champion // Now telle me seyde

Sir Bors what ys that Prydain le noyre Sir he ys the moste

douted man of thys londe Than may ye sende hir worde that ye

haue founde a knyght that shall fyght with that Prydain le

noyre in goddis quarelle and youres So that lady was than glad

and sente her worde that she was purveyde // And so that nyght

Sir Bors had passyng good chere but in no bedde he wolde com

but leyde hym on the floore nor neuer wolde do oÞer wyse tyll that

he had mette with the queste of the Sankegreall And anone as

he was a slepe hym be felle a vision Þat Þer cam ij birdis Þat one whyȝt 

as a swanne and that oÞer was merveylous blacke but he was nat

so grete as was that oÞer but in the lyknes of a Raven Than Þe

whyght birde cam to hym and seyde and Þou woldist gyff me                    

me mete and serue me I sholde gyff the all the ryches of Þe worlde

and I shall make the as fayre and as whyght as I am So the

whyght birde departed and Þan cam the blacke birde to hym and

seyde And Þou serue me to morow and haue me in no dispite

Þouȝe I be blacke for wyte Þou well that more avaylith myne

 

f. 381v (XVI.8)

 

blaknesse than the odirs whyghtnesse and than he departed Than he had

a nethir vision that he cam to a grete place which semed a chapell

and there he founde a chayre sette on the lyffte syde which was

worme etyn and fyeble the tre be syde hit and on the ryght honde

were ij floures lyke a lylye and that one wolde a be nomme Þe toÞer

theyre whyghtnes // But a good man departed them Þat they towched

none othir And Þan oute of eche floure com oute many floures

and fruyte grete plente // Than hym thouȝt Þe good man seyde sholde

nat he do grete foly that wolde lette thes ij floures perishe for to

succoure the rottyn tre that hyt felle nat to the erthe // Sir seyde

he it semyth me that thys wood myȝt nat avayle Now kepe the

seyde the good man that Þou neuer se such· aduenture be falle the

Than he awaked and made a sygne of the crosse in myddys of

the foreyste hede and so he arose and clothed hym and a none

there cam the lady of the place and she salewed hym and he her

a gayne and so wente to a chapell and herd Þer seruyse And a

none there cam a company of knyghtes that the lady had sente

for to lede Sir Bors vnto the batayle // Than asked he his armys

And whan he was armed she prayde hym to take a lytyll

morsell to dyne // Nay madam seyde he that shall I nat do tylle

I haue done my batayle by the grace of God / And so he lepe

vppon hys horse and departed and all the knyghtes and men

with hym And as sone as thes ij· ladyes mette to gydir she

which· Sir Bors sholde fyght for she playned hir And seyde

Madam ye haue done grete wronge to be ryve me my landis

that kyng Anyauss gaff me and full lothe I am Þer sholde be

ony batayle // ye shall nat chose seyde the oÞer othir ellis lat your

knyght withdraw hym Than there was the cry made which

party had the bettir of Þo ij knyghtes that hys lady sholde reioyse 


f. 382 (XVI.8-9)

 

all the londys Than departed the one knyght here and Þeer there ·

Than they cam to gydirs with such raundom Þat they perced Þe shildes

and Þer habergeons and Þer spearis flye in pecis and they sore woun//

ded Than hurteled they to gydyrs so that they beete eche oÞer to the

erthe and theire horsis be twene Þer leggis And anone they arose

and sette handis to Þer swerdys and smote eche one oÞer vppon Þer

hedys that they made grete woundis and depe that the blode wente

oute of hyre bodyes For there founde Sir Bors gretter deffence in

that knyght more than he wente For hys Sir Prydain was a

passyng good knyght and wounded Sir Bors full evyll & he hym

a gayne But euer sir Pridain hylde Þe stowre in lyche harde / That percey//

ved Sir Bors and suffird hym tylle he was nyȝe ataynte And

than he ranne vppon hym more and more And the oÞer wente

backe for drede of dethe // So in hys withdrawyng he felle vpryȝt

And Sir Bors drew hys helme so strongely that he rente hit

frome frome hys hede and gaff hym many sadde strokes with the flatte

of hys swerde vppon the visayge and bade hym yelde hym or he

sholde sle hym // Than he cryed hym mercy and seyde fayre knyȝt

for goddis love sle me nat and I shall ensure the neuer to warre

a yenste thy lady but be all way towarde hir So sir Bors gaffe

hym hys lyff and anone the olde lady fledde with all hir knyghtes

Than called Sir Bors all Þo that hylde landis of hys ladyes

and seyde he sholde destroy them but if they dud suche seruyse vnto

them her as longed to Þer londys So they dud her omayge and Þey

that wolde nat were chaced oute of Þer londis That hit be felle Þat

the yonge lady com to her astate a gayne be the myȝty provesse

of Sir Bors de ganys So whan all the contrey was well sette

in pease Than Sir Bors toke hys leve & departed & she thanked hym

gretly and wolde haue gyffyn hym grete gyfftes but he refused


f. 382v (XVI.9)

 

hit Than he rode all that day tylle nyght and so he cam to an her//

berow to a lady which knew hym well I nowȝe and made of hym

grete Joy So on the morne as sone as the day appered Sir Bors de//

parted from thens and so rode in to a foreyste vnto the owre of myd//

day and there be felle hym a mervaylous aventure So he mette

at the departynge of the ij dayes ij· knyghtes that lad Sir Lyonell·

hys brothir all naked bowndyn vppo a stronge hakeney and his

hondis bounden to fore hys breste and euerych· of them helde in

theyre hondis Þornys where with they wente wente betynge hym

so sore that the bloode trayled downe more Þan In an C· placis

of hys body so that he was all bloode to fore and be hynde but

he seyde neuer a worde as he whych was grete of herte suffird

all that they ded to hym as Þouȝe he had felte none angwysh

And anone Sir Bors dressed hym to rescow hym that was his

brothir And so he loked vppon the oÞer syde of hym & sawe a knyȝt

which brouȝt a fayre Jantill woman and wolde a sette her

in the thycke of the foreyste for to haue be the more surer oute

of the way from hem that souȝt her And she whych was

no thynge assured cryde with an hyȝe voice Seynte Mary succour

youre mayde And anone as she syȝe Sir Bors she demed hym

a knyght of the rounde table Than he conioured hym by the

faythe that he ought vnto hym in whos seruyse Þou arte entred

for kynge Arthures sake which I suppose made the knyght

Þat Þou helpe me and suffir me nat to be shamed of this

knyght // Whan Sir Bors herde hir say Þus he had so much

sorow that he wyst nat what to do for if I latte my brothir

be in aduenture he muste be slayne and that wold I nat for all

the erthe And if I helpe nat the mayde she ys shamed & shall

lose hir virginite which· she shall neuer gete a gayne Than lyffte


f. 383 (XVI.9-10)

 

he vp hys yȝen and seyde wepynge fayre swete lorde Jhu cryst whos

creature I am kepe me Sir Lyonell my brothir that Þes knyghtes

sle hym nat and for pite of you and for mylde maryes sake I

shall succour thys mayde Than dressed he hym vnto the knyght

which had the Jantill woman and Þan he cryed Sir knyght let

youre honde of youre maydyn or ye be but dede and and Þan he sette

downe the mayden And was armed at all pycis sauff he lacked

his speare Than he dressed hys shylde and drew vnto his swerde

And Sir Bors smote hym so harde that hit wente thorow hys

shylde and habirgeon on the lyffte sholdir and thorow grete

strengthe he bete hym downe to the erthe And at the pullyng

oute of Sir Bors spere he there sowned Than cam sir Bors to

the mayde and seyde how semyth hit you of thys knyght be ye

delyuerde at thys tyme Now sir seyde she I pray you lede me Þer as Þis

knyght had me So shall I do gladly and toke the horse of Þe wounded

knyght as sette the Jantilwoman vppon hym and so brought

hir as the desired // Sir knyght seyde she ye haue bettir spedde Þan

ye wente for and I had loste my maydynhede v·C· men sholde

haue dyed Þerfore // what knyght was he that had you in Þe foreyst

Be my fayth he ys my cosyne So wote I neuer what engyne the

fynde enchaffed hym for yestirday he toke me fro my fadir puayly

for I noÞer none of my fadirs men myssetrusted hym nat And iff

he had had my maydyn hode he had dyed for the synne of hys body

and shamed and dishonoured for euer // Thus as she stood talkyng with

hym there cam xij· knyghtes sekyng aftir hir And anone she tolde

hem all how Sir Bors had delyuerde hir Than they made grete

Joy and be souȝt hym to com to her fadir a grete lorde and he

sholde be ryght well com // Truly seyde Sir Bors that may nat

nat be at thys tyme for I haue a grete aventure to do in Þis contrey


f. 383v (XVI.10-11)

 

So he commaunde hem to god and departed Than Sir Bors rode after

Sir Lyonell hys brothir by the tace trace of Þer horsis Thus he rode

sekyng a grete whyle And anone he ouertoke a man clothed in a re//

ligious wede and rode on a stronge blacke horse blacker Þan a byry

and seyde Sir knyght what seke you Sir seyde he I seke my broÞer

that I saw ere whyle betyn with ij knyghtes A Sir Bors discomforte

you nat nor falle nat in to no wanhope for I shall telle you tydyn//

gis such as they be for truly he ys dede Than shewed he hym a new

slayne body lyyng in a buyssh and hit semed hym well that hyt

was the body of Sir Lyonell hys brothir and Þan he made suche

sorow that he felle to the erth · in a sowne and so lay a grete whyle

there And whan he cam to hym selff he seyde fayre broÞer sytthe

Þe company of you and me ar departed shall I neuer haue Joy in my

herte And now he whych· I haue takyn vnto my mayster he be

my helpe And whan he had seyde Þus he toke the body lyȝtly

in hys armys and put hit vp on the harson of hys sadyll //

And than he seyde to the man can ye shew me ony chapell nyȝe

where that I may bury thys body Com one seyde here ys one faste

bye And so longe they rode tylle they saw a fayre towre And a fore

hit there semed an olde fyeble chapell And Þan they a lyȝt bothe

and put hym in the tombe of marble // Now leve we hym here

seyde the good man and go we to oure herberow tylle to morow

we com hyre a gayne to do hym seruyse // Sir seyd sir Bors be ye a

pryest // ye for sothe seyde he Than I pray you telle me a dreme

that be felle me the laste myght / Say on seyde he so he be gon so

much· to telle hym of the grete birde in the foreyste And aftir

tolde hym of hys birdys one whyght and anoÞer blacke and of

the rottyn tre and of the whyght floures // Sir I shall telle you

a parte now and the othir dele to morow The whyght fowle be


f. 384 (XVI.11)

 

tokenyth a Jantill woman fayre and ryche whych loved Þe paramoure

and hath loved the longe // And if that Þou warne hir love she shall

by a none and if Þou haue no pite on her that signifieth the grete

birde which shall make the to warne hir Now for no feare Þat thou

haste ne for no drede Þat Þou hast of god Þou shalt nat warne

hir for Þou woldist nat do hit for to be holdyn chaste for to conquere

the love of the vayne glory of the worlde for that shall be falle

the now and Þou warne hir that Sir Launcelot the good knyȝt

thy Cousyn shall dye And than shall men sey that Þou arte a man//

slear both of thy brothir Sir Lyonell and of thy Cousyn sir Launclot

whych Þu myght haue rescowed easyly But Þou wentist to res//

cow a mayde which perteyned no thynge to the // Now loke Þou wheÞer

hit had bene gretter harme of thy broÞers dethe oÞer ellis to haue suff//

firde her to haue loste hir maydynhode Than seyde he now hast

Þou harde the tokyns of thy dreme // ye seyd sir Bors Than ys hit

in thy defauȝte if Sir Launcelot thy cousyn dye Sir seyde sir Bors

that were me lothe for there ys thynge in the worlde but I had

levir do than to se my lorde Sir Launcelot dye in my defauȝt Chose

ye now the tone or that oÞer Than he ladde hym in to the hygh

towre and there he founde knyghtes and ladyes that seyde he was

welcom And so they vnarmed hym and whan he was in his

dublette they brought hym a mantell furred with Ermyne And

put hit a boute hym So they made hym such· chere that he had

forgotyn hys sorow And anone cam oute of a chambir vnto hym

the fayryst lady that euer he saw and more rycher be seyne Þan euer

was quene Guenyuer or ony oÞer astate // Lo seyde they Sir Bors

here ys the lady vnto whom we owȝe all oure seruyse And I trow

she be the rychyst lady and the fayryste of the worlde whych·

lovith you beste a boven all oÞer knyghtes for she woll haue no knyȝt

but you And whan he vndirstood that langayge he was a baysshed


f. 384v (XVI.11-12)

 

Not for than she salewed hym and he her and than they sate downe

to gydirs and spake of many thyngis In so much that she be sought

hym to be hir love for she had loved hym a boven all erthly men and

she sholde make hym rycher than euyr was man and of hys ayge

whan Sir Bors vndirstood hir wordis he was ryght evyll at

ease but in no wyse he wolde breke his chastite and so he wyst nat

how to answere her Alas Sir Bors seyde she // woll ye nat do my

wylle Madam seyde he there ys no lady in thys worlde whos wylle I

wolde full fylle as of thys tynge she ought nat desire hit for my

brothir lyeth dede which was slayne ryght late // A Sir Bors seyde

she I haue loved you longe for the grete beaute for the grete beaute I

haue sene in you and the grete hardynesse that I haue herde of you

that nedys ye muste lye be me to nyght there fore I pray you graunte me

Truly seyde he I shall do hit in no maner wyse Than anone she made

hym such sorow as Þouȝe she wolde haue dyed // well Sir Bors seyd

she vnto thys haue ye brought me nyȝe to myne ende And Þer with

she toke hym by the hande and bade hym be holde her and ye shall

se how I shall dye for youre love And he seyd Þan I shall hit neuer

se Than she departed and wente vp in to an hyȝe batilment and

lad with her xij· Jantilwomen and whan they were a bove one

of the Jantill women cryed A Sir Bors Jantill knyght haue mercy

on vs all and suffir my lady to haue hir wyll and if ye do nat

we muste suffir dethe with oure lady for to falle downe of Þis hyȝe

towre And if ye suffir vs Þus to dye for so litill a thynge all ladys

and Jantill women woll sey you dishonoure Than loked he vp/

warde and saw they semed all ladyes of grete astate and rychely

and well be seyne than had he of hem grete pite nat for that he

was nat vncounceyled in hym selff that levir he had they all

had loste Þer soules than he hys soule and with that they felle

all at onys vnto the erthe And whan he saw that he was

all a baysshed and had Þer of grete mervayle & with Þat he blyssed


f. 385 (XVI.12-13)

 

hys body and hys vysayge And anone he harde a grete noyse and

a grete cry as all the fyndys of helle had bene a boute hym And Þer

with noÞer towre lady ne Jantill women noÞer no chapell where he

brought hys brothir to Than hylde he vp both hys hondis to Þe

hevyn and seyde fayre swete lorde fadir & god in hevyn I am grevous//

ly ascaped And than he toke hys armys and hys horse and set hym

on hys way And anone he herde a clocke smyte on hys ryght honde

and thydir he cam to an abbay which was closed with hyȝe wallis

and there was he lette In And anone they supposed that he was

one of the knyghtes of the rounde table Þat was in the queste of the

sankgreall So they led hym In to a chambir and vnarmed hym

Sirs seyde Sir Bors if Þer be ony holy man in thys house I pray

you lette me speke with hym Than one of hem lad hym vnto

the abbotte which was in a chapell And than Sir Bors salewed

hym and he hym a gayne Sir seyde sir Bors I am a knyght

arraunte and tolde hym the aduentures whych he had sene

Sir knyght seyde the abbotte I wote nat what ye be for I wente Þat a

knyght of youre ayge myght nat haue be so stronge in the gre of

oure lorde Jhu cryste Nat for than ye shall go vnto youre reste

for I woll nat counceyle thys day hit ys to late And to morow

I shall counceyle you as I can And that nyght was sir Bors serued

rychely and on the morne erly he harde masse And Þan Þe abbot

cam to hym and bade hym good morow and Sir Bors to hym a

gayne and than he tolde hym he was felow of the queste of

the Sangreall and how he had charge of the holy man to ete

brede and watir Than oure lorde shewed hym vnto you in Þe

lyknesse of a fowle that suffirde grete anguysshe for vs whan

he was putte vppon the crosse and bledde hys herte blood for

mankynde There was the tokyn and the lyknesse of Þe Sankgre//

all that appered a fore you for the blood Þat the grete fowle bledde


f. 385v (XVI.13)

 

reysyd the chykyns frome dethe to lyff And by the bare tre betoke//

nyth the worlde whych ys naked and nedy with oute fruyte but if

hit com of oure lorde Also the lady for whom ye fought for And kyng

Anyauss whych was lrode Þer to betokenyth Jhu cryste which ys kyng

of the worlde And that he fought with the champion for Þe lady

Þus hit betokenyth whan he toke the lady batayle for the lady by

her shall ye vndirstonde the olde law of oure lord Jhu cryst and

holy chirche And by the othir lady ye shall vndirstonde the olde

lawe and the fynde which all day warryth ayenst holy chirch

there fore ye dud youre batayle with ryght For ye be Jhu Crystes

knyght there fore ye ouȝte to be defenders of holy chirche whych

seyth I am blacke but he ys fayre and by the whyght birde may

men vndirstonde the fynde and I shall telle you how the swan

ys whyght with oute furth and blacke with In // Hit ys Ipocresye

which ys with yalow or pale and semyth with oute forth Þe seruntis

of Jhu cryste but they be with In furthe so horrible of fylth & synne

and be gyle the worlde so evyll Also whan the fynde apperith to you

in lyknesse of a man or religion and blamed the Þat Þou lefft thy

brothir for a lady And he lede the where Þou semed thy brothir

was slayne but he ys yette on lyve and all was for to putte

the in erroure and to brynge the in to wanhope and lechery for

he knew Þou were tendir herted And all was for Þou sholdist

nat fynde the aventure of the Sankgreall And the thirde fowle

be tokenyth the stronge batayle a yenste the fayre ladyes whych

were all devyls Also the dry tre and the whyght lylyes The

sere tre betokenyth thy brothir Sir Lyonell whych ys dry with oute

vertu and Þer fore men ouȝte to calle hym the rotyn tre & Þe worme

etyn tre for he ys a murtherer and doth· contrary to the order off

knyghthode And Þe ij· whyght floures signifieth ij maydyns Þe one

ys a knyght which ys wounded Þeer day & Þeer Is Þe Jantill woman


f. 386 (XVI.13-14)

 

whych ye rescowed and why the oÞer floure drew nye the toÞer Þat was

the knyght which wolde haue defowled her and hym selff bothe

And Sir Bors ye had bene a grete foole and In grete perell for to

haue sene the ij· flowris perish for to succoure the rottyn tre for and

they had synned to gydir they had be dampned And for ye rescowed

them bothe men myght calle you a verry knyght & Þe serunte of Jhu

cryste // Than wente Sir Bors frome thens and commaunded the

abbotte to god And Þan he rode all that day and herberowde with an

olde lady And on the morne he rode to a castell in a valey and Þer

he mette with a yoman goyng a grete pace towarde a foreyste

Sey me seyde Sir Bors canst Þou telle me of ony aduenture Sir

seyde he here shall be vndir thys castell a grete and a meruaylous

turnemente Of what folkys shall hit be seyde sir Bors the erle

of Playns shall be on the tone party and the ladyes nevew off

Hervyn on the todir party · Than Sir Bors thought to be there to

assay iff he myght mete with hys brothir Sir Lyonell or ony oÞer

of hys felyship whych were in the queste of the Sankgreall Than

turned to an Ermytayge that was in the entre of the foreysst and

whan he was com thydir he founde there Sir Lyonell his broÞer

which sate all armed at the entre of the chapell dore for to a byde

there herberow tylle on the morne that the turnemente sholde be

And whan Sir Bors saw hym he had grete ioy of hym that no

man cowde telle of gretter ioy // And than he a lyght of his horse

and seyde fayre swete brothir whan cam ye hydir And as Sir

Lyonell saw hym he seyde A Sir Bors ye may nat make none

avaunte but as for you I myght haue bene slayne whan ye

saw ij knyghtes lede me a way beatynge me ye leffte me to succour

a Jantill woman and suffird me in perell of deth · for neuer arste

ne ded no brothir to a noÞer so grete an vntrouÞe And for Þat mysse

dede I ensure you now but dethe for well haue ye deserued hit Þer


f. ȝ86v (XVI.14)

 

for kepe you frome me frome hens forewarde and that shall ye fynde as

sone as I am armed / whan Sir Bors vndirstode hys brothers wratth

he kneled downe to fore hym to the erthe and cryed hym mercy holdyng

vp both hys hondis and prayde hym to for gyff hym hys evyll wylle

Nay nay seyde Sir Lyonell that shall neuer and I may haue the hyȝer

hande that I make myne avow to god Þou shalt haue dethe for hit

were pite ye lyved any lenger Ryght so he wente In and toke his

harneyse and lyȝte vppon his horse and cam to fore hym & seyde

Sir Bors kepe the from me for I shall do to the as I wolde do to a

felon oÞer a traytoure for ye be the vntrewyst knyght that euer

cam oute of so worthy an house as was kyng Bors de ganns

which was oure fadir There fore sterte vppon thy horse and so

shalt Þou be moste at thyne avauntayge And but if Þou wylt

I woll renne vppon the there as Þou arte on foote And so

the shame shall be myne and the harme youres but of Þat        

shame recke I nouȝt Whan Sir Bors sye that he must fyght              

with his brothir othir ellis to dye he wyst nat what to do So                
hys herte counceyled hym nat Þer to In as much as sir Lyonell                 

was hys elder brothir where fore he ouȝte to bere hym reuerence                        

yette kneled he a downe a gayne to fore Sir Lyonelles horse feete                       

and seyde fayre swete brothir haue mercy vppon me and sle me

nat and haue in remembraunce the grete love which ouȝte to be

be twene vs ij // So what som euer Sir Bors seyde to sir Lyonell

he rouȝt nat for the fynde had brought hym in suche a wylle

that he sholde sle hym // So whan Sir Lyonell saw he wolde

none oÞer do nor wolde nat ryse to gyff hym batayle he russhed

ouer hym so that he smote Sir Bors with his hys horse feete

vpwarde to the erthe and hurte hym so sore that he sowned

for distresse which he felte in hym selff to have dyed withoute

confession // So whan Sir Lyonell saw thys he a lyȝt of hys             


f. 387 (XVI.14-15)

 

horse to haue smytten of hys hede and so he toke hym by the helme and

wolde haue rente hit frome hys hede // There with cam the ermyte

rennynge vnto hym which· was a good man and of grete ayge

and well had herde all the wordis he lepe be twene them and so

felle downe vppon sir Bors and seyde vnto Sir Lyonell A Jantyll

knyght haue mercy vppon me and vppon thy brothir for if Þou sle

hym Þou shalt be dede of that synne And that were grete sorow·

for he ys one of the worthyest knyghtes of the worlde and of beste

condicions So go god me helpe Sir pryste but if ye fle from hym

I shall sle you and he shall neuer the sunner be quytte // Sertes

seyde the good man I had levir ye sle me than hym For as for

my dethe shall nat be grete harme nat halff so much as for his

woll be // well seyd Sir Leonell I am a greed and sette his honde

to his swerde and smote hym so harde that hys hede yode off

bacwarde And nat for than he rescowed hym nat of hys evyll

wyll but toke hys brothir by the helme and vnlaced hit to have

smytten off hys hede and had slayne hym had nat afelowe

of hys of the rounde table com whos name was called Sir

Colle Grevaunce a felow of the rounde table that com thydyr

as oure lordis wyll wolde and whan he saw the good man slayne

he mervayled much· what hit myght be And than he be hylde

Sir Lyonell that wolde haue slayne hys brothir Sir Bors which

he loved ryght well Than sterte he a downe and toke sir Lyonell

by the shuldirs and drew hym strongely a backe frome sir Bors

and seyde to Sir Lyonell woll ye sle youre brothir the worthyest

knyght one of the worlde that sholde no good man suffir // why

so seyde Sir Lyonell woll ye lette me Þer off for if ye entir mete Þer

off I shall sle you to and hym Þer afftir // why seyde Sir Colgreuaunce

ys thys sothe that ye woll sle hym // yee sle hym woll I who so

seyth the contrary for he hath done so muche a yenst me that he

hath · well deserued hit and so ran vppon hym and wolde haue


f. 387v (XVI.15-16)

 

smytte n of the hede And so Sir Colgrevaunce ran be twixte them

and seyde and ye be so hardy to do so more we ij· shall medyll to

gidirs // So whan Sir Lyonell vndirstood his wordis he toke his

shylde to fore hym and asked hym what that he was // Sir my

name ys Sir Coll Grevaunce one of his felowis // Than sir Lyonell

defyed hym and so he sterte vppon hym and gaff hym a grete stroke

thorow the helme Than he d^rew his swerde for he was a passyng good

knyght and defended hym ryght manfully and so longe dured Þer Þis

batayle that Sir Bors sate vp all angwyshlye and be hylde Sir

Collegrevaunce the good knyght that fouȝt with his broÞer for his

quarell · There of he was full hevy And thouȝt if Sir Coll grevaunce

slew hys brothir that he sholde neuer haue Joy Also and if hys

brothir slew Sir Coll grevaunce the same shame sholde euer be

myne Than wolde he have haue rysen to to haue departed Þem

but he had nat so much · myght to stonde oone foote // And so

he a bode so longe that Sir Collgrevaunce was ouer Þrowyn

for thys Sir Lyonell was of grete chevalry & passyng hardy for

he had perced the hawbirke and the helme so sore that h A

bode but deth · for he had lost much blood Þat hit was mervayle

that he myght stonde vp ryght Than be hylde he Sir Bors

whych sate dressyng vpward hym selff which seyde a Sir Bors

why cam ye nat to rescowe me oute of perell of dethe where In       

I haue putte me to succour you whych were ryght now nyȝe dethe       

Sertes seyde Sir Lyonell that shall nat avayle you for none of    

you shall be othirs warraunte but ye shall dye both · of my        

honde // whan Sir Bors herde that he seyde so muche he arose         

and put on hys helme And than he perceyved fist Þer Ermyte                    

pryste whych was slayne Than made he a mervaylous sorow                  

vppon hym // Than Sir Collgrevaunce cryed offtyn vppon Sir

Bors and seyde why woll ye lat me dye here for your sake ·

no forse Sir if hit please you that I shall dy the deth · shall please   


f. 388 (XVI.16-17)

 

me the bettir for to save a worthyer man myght I neuer ressayve

the dethe // with that worde Sir Lyonell smote of the helme frome

hys hede And whan Sir Collgrevaunce saw that he myght nat

ascape Than he seyde fayre swete Jhu cryste that I haue myssedo

haue mercy vppon my soule for such · sorow that my harte suf//

firthe for goodnes and for almes dede that I wolde haue done

here be to me alyegemente of penaunce vnto my sowle helthe

And so at thes wordis Sir Lyonell smote hym so sore that he

bare hym dede to the erthe And whan he had slayne Sir Coll

Greuaunce he ran vppon hys brothir as a fyndely man and gaff

hym such a stroke that he made hym stoupe and as he that was

full of humilite prayde hym for goddis love to leve his batayle

for if hit be felle fayre brothir if that I sle you oÞer ye me we

both · shall dye for that synne So god me helpe I shall neuer haue

othir mercy and I may haue the bettir honde · well seyde sir Bors

and drew hys swerde all wepyng and seyde fayre broÞer god

knowith myne entente for ye haue done full evyll thys day

to sle an holy pryste whych neuer trespasted Also ye haue slayne

a Jantill knyght and one of oure felowis And well wote ye Þat

I am nat a ferde of yow gretely but I drede the wratthe of god

and thys ys an vnkyndely werre Þer fore  god shew hys myracle

vppon vs bothe And god haue mercy vppon me Þouȝe I defende

my lyff a yenst my brothir And so with that Sir Bors lyffte

vp hys honde and wolde haue smyttyn hys brothir And with that

he harde a voice whych · seyde fle Sir Bors and towche hym

nat othir ellis Þou shalt sle hym // Ryght so a lyght a clowde

be twyxte them in lykenes of a fayre and mervaylous flame

that bothe hir ij· shyldis brente Than were they sore a ferde &

felle both to the erthe and lay Þer a grete whyle in a sowne //

And whan they cam to them selff Sir Bors saw that hys

brothir had none harme than he hylde vp both his hondys


f. 388v (XVI.17)

 

for he drad last god had takyn vengeaunce vppon hym So with that

he harde a voyce that seyde Sir Bors go hens and beare Þy felyship

no lenger with thy brothir but take thy way anone ryght to Þe see

for Sir Percivale a bydith the there // Than he seyde to his broÞer

for goddis love fayre swete brothir for gyff me my trespasse Than

he answerd and seyde god for gyff you and I do gladly So sir Bors

departed frome hym and rode the next way to the se And at Þe last

by fortune he cam to an abbay which was nyȝe the see And Þat

nyght he rested hym there And as he slepte Þer cam a voyse

and bade hym go to the see than he sterte vp and made a signe

of the crosse and toke hym to hys harnes and made redy hys

horse and at a brokyn wall he rode oute and by fortune he

cam to the see and vppon the see stronde he founde a shyppe

that was couerde all with whyght samyte // Than he a lyȝte

and be toke hym to Jhu cryste and as sone as he was entird

the shippe departed in to the see  and to hys semyng hit wente

fleyng but hit was sone durked that he myght know no man

Than he layde hym downe & slept tyll hit was day And whan

he was waked he sawe in myddis of the shippe a knyght

lye all armed sauff hys helme And anone he was ware hit

was Sir Percivale de galys & Þan he made of hym ryȝt grete Joy

But Sir Percivale de galys was a baysshed of hym and asked what he

was A fayre Sir seyde Sir Bors know ye me nat Sertes seyde

he I mervayle how ye cam hydir but if oure lorde brought

you hydir hym selff Than Sir Bors smyled and ded off hys

helme And a none Sir Percyvale knew hym and ayÞer made

grete Joy of othir that hit was mervayle to hyre Than sir Bors

tolde hym how he cam in to the ship and by whos a monyshmet

and aythir told oÞer fo Þer temptacions as ye haue herde to fore

honde So wente they dryvyng in the see one whyle backwarde

 

 

 

                                                            a noÞer while foreward


f. 389 (XVI.17-XVII.1)

 

a noÞer whyle    forewarde and euery man comforted oÞer and euer they were in theyre

prayers Than seyde sir Percivale · we lak no Þynge but sir Galahad Þe

the good knyght Now turnyth Þe tale vnto Sir Galahad ·

Now seyth the tale whan Sir Galahad had rescowed

Sir Percyvale frome the xxti knyghtes he rode Þo in to a

waste foreyste where In he dud many Journeyes & founde ma//

ny aduentures which he brouȝt all to an ende where of the

tale makith here no mencion // Than he toke hys way to the see

and on a day as hit be felle as he passed by a castell there was

a wondir turnemente but they with oute had done so much

that they with in were put to the worse and yet were they

with In good knyghtes I now // So whan Sir Galahad saw Þo with

In were at so grete myschyff that men slew hem at the entre of

the castell Than he thought to helpe them and put a speare

furthe and smote the firste that he flowe to the erthe And the

speare yode in pecis Than he drew hys swerde and smote Þer as

they were thyckyst and so he dud wondirfull dedys of armys that

all they mervayled And so hyt happynde that Sir Gawayne and

Sir Ector de marys were with the knyghtes with oute // But Þan they

aspyed the whyght shylde with the rede crosse And anone that

one seyde to that othir yondir ys the good knyght Sir Galahad

the haute prynce Now for sothe me thynkith he shall be a grete

foole that shall mete with hym to fyght But at the last by

aventure he cam by Sir Gawayne and smote hym so sore Þat

that he clave hys helme and the coyff of Iron vnto the hede //

that Sir Gawayne felle to the erthe but the stroke was so grete

that hit slented downe and kutte the horse sholdir in too / So

whan Sir Ector saw Sir Gawayne downe he drew hym

a syde and thouȝt hit no wyse dom for to a byde hym and also

for naturall love for be cause he was hys vncle // Thus Þorow


f. 389v (XVII.1)

 

hys hardynesse he bete a backe all the knyghtes with oute And Þan

they with In cam oute and chaced Þem all a boute But whan

Sir Galahad saw there wolde none turne a gayne he stale a

way prevayly and no man wyste where he was be com Now

be my hede seyde Sir Gawayne vnto Sir Ector now ar Þe wondirs

trew that was seyd of Sir Launcelot that the swerd which stake

in the stone sulde shulde gyff me suche a buffette Þat I wold nat

haue hit for the beste castell in the worlde and sothely now

hit ys preved trew for neuer ar had I such a stroke of mannys honde

Sir seyde Sir Ector me semyth youre queste ys done And myne

ys nat done // well seyde he I shall seke no farther · Than was sir

Gawayne borne in to the castell and vnarmed hym and leyde hym

in a rych · bedde and a leche was founde to hele hym And sir Ector

wolde nat departe frome hym tyll he was nyȝe hole // And so Þis good

knyght Sir Galahad rode so faste that he cam that nyght to the

castell of Carbonecke And so hit be felle hym that he was be

nyghted and cam vnto an armytayge // So the good man was

fayne whan he saw he was a knyght arraunte // So whan Þey

were at reste there be felle a Jantill womand com and caokkede

at the dore and called Sir Galahad and so the good man cam

to the dore to wete what she wolde than she called the Ermyte sir

vlphyne and seyde I am a Jantill woman that wolde fayne

speke with the knyght whych ys with in you Than the good man

a waked Sir Galahad and bade hym aryse and speke with a Jan//

tyll woman that semyth she hath grete nede of you Than Sir

Galahad and asked hir what she wolde // Sir Galahad seyde she I

woll that ye arme you and lyȝt vppon thys horse and sew me

for I shall shew you with in thys iij· dayes the hyghest aduenture Þat

euer ony knyght saw So anone Sir Galahad armed hym and

toke hys horse and commended the Emyte to god And so he bade Þe

Jantill woman to ryde and he wolde folow there as she lyked //


f. 390 (XVII.2)

 

So she rode as faste as hir palferey myght bere her tyll that she cam

to the see whych was called Collybye and by nyght they com vnto

a castell in a valey closed with a rennyng watir whych had stronge

wallis and hyȝe And so she entird in to the castell with Sir Galahad

And there had he grete chere for the lady of that castell was Þe dame//

sels lady So was he vnarmed // Than seyde the damesell madame

shall we a byde here all thys day nay seyde she but tylle he hath

dyned and slepte a litill and so he ete and slepte a whyle and Þis

mayde than called hym and armed hym by torche lyȝt And

whan the mayden was horsed and he bothe the lady toke sir Galahad

a fayre shylde and ryche and so they departed frome the castell and

rode tylle they cam to the see and there they founde the shippe that

Sir Bors and Sir Percivale was In whych seyde on the ship bonde

bourde // Sir Galahad ye be well com for we have a bydyn you

longe And whan he herde them he asked them what they were

Sir seyde she leve youre horse hyre and I shall leve myne also

and toke hir sadils and hir brydyls with them and made a

crosse on them and so entird in to the ship and Þe ij· knyghtes

resceyved them bothe with grete ioy and euerych knew oÞer And so

the wynde a rose and drove hem thorow the see in to a meruayles

place And with in a whyle hit dawed Than dud Sir Galahad

of hys helme and hys swerde and asked of hys felowis from whens

com that fayre shippe // Trewly seyde they ye wote as well as we

but hit com of goddis grace and Þan they tolde euerych to othir

of all theyre harde aventures and of her grete temptacions

Truly seyd Sir Galahad ye ar much bounden to god for ye haue

escaped ryght grete adventures // Sertes had nat this Jantill

woman bene I had nat come hydir at thys tyme For as for

you ij· I wente neuer to haue founde you in thys straunge contreys

A Sir Galahad seyde Sir Bors if Sir Launcelot your fadir were


f. 390v (XVII.2-3)

 

here than were we well at ease for than me semed we fayled no

thynge // That may nat be seyd Sir Galahad but if hit pleased our

lorde by than the shipp had renne frome the londe of logrys many

myles So by aduenture hit aryved vp by twyxte ij rocchis pass//

synge grete and meruaylous but there they myght nat londe for

there was a swalowe of the see // Save there was a noÞer shippe

and vppon hit they myght go with oute daungere // Now go

we thydir seyde the Jantill woman and there shall we se ad//

ventures for so ys oure lordys wylle And wan they com thyder

they founde the shippe ryche I nowȝe but they founde noÞer man

nor woman Þer In but they founde in the ende of the shippe ij·

fayre lettirs wrytten which seyde a dredefull worke & a meruay//

lous // Thou man whych shalt entir in to thys shippe be ware

that Þou be in stedefaste beleve for I am faythe and Þer fore be ware

how Þou entirst but if Þou be stedfaste for and Þou sayle Þer of

I shall nat helpe the And than seyde the Jantill woman Sir

Percivale seyde she wote ye what I am Sertes seyde he nay vnto

my wytynge I saw you neuer arst wyte ye well seyde she I am

thy syster whych was douȝter vnto kynge Pellynor And Þer fore

wete you welle ye ar the man that I moste love and if ye be nat

in perfite be lyve of Jhu cryste he entir nat in no maner of wyse

for than sholde ye perish the shippe for he ys so perfite he woll suf//

fir no synner with In hym // So whan Sir Percyvale vndirstode

she was hys verry syster he was Inwardly glad and seyde fayre

sister I shall entir In for If I be a mysse creature oÞer an vntrew

knyght there shall I perische // So in the meane wlyle sir Galahad

blyssed hym and entirde Þer Inne And so nexte the Jantill woma

And than Sir Bors and than Sir Percyvale and whan they

were In hit was so mervaylous fayre and ryche and a myddis

the shippe was a fayre bedde And anone Sir Galahad wente


f. 391 (XVII.3)

 

Þer to and founde Þer on a crowne of sylke and at the feete was a swerde

rych and fayre and hit was drawyn oute of the sheeth a foote and

more and the swerde was of dyuerse fassions and the pomell was

of stoone and there was in hym all maner of coloures Þat ony man

myght fynde And euery of the coloures had dyuerse vertues & Þe scalis

of the hauffte were of ij rybbis of ij dyuerse bestis that one was a

serpente whych ys couersaunte In Calydone and ys calle Þer Þe serpente

of the fynde And the boone of hym ys of such vertu that Þer ys no

hande that handelith hym shall neuer be wery noÞer hurte And Þe

and the oÞer bone ys of a fyssh whych ys nat ryght grete & haun//

tith the floode of Eufrate and that fyssh ys called Ertanay and

the bonys be of such maner of kynde that who that handelyth

hym shall haue so muche wyll that he shall neuer be wery and

he shall nat thynke on Joy noÞer sorow that he hath had But

only that thynge that he be holdith be fore hym And as for

thys swerde there shall man be grype hym Þat ys to sey the hand

but one and he shall passe all othir In the name of god seyd

Sir Percivale I shall assay to handyll hit So he sette hys honde to

the swerde but he myght nat be grype hit be my faythe seyd

he now have I fayled Than Sir Bors sette to hys hande & fay

led // Than Sir Galahad be hylde the swerde and saw lettirs

lyke bloode that seyde lat se who dare draw me oute of my sheet

but if he be more hardyer than ony oÞer For who that drawith i

oute wete you welle he shall neuer be shamed of hys body noÞer

wounded to the dethe // Persay seyde Sir Galahad I wolde draw

thys swerde oute of the sheethe but the offendynge ys so grete th

I shall nat sende my hande there to // Now sirs seyde the Jantill wo

man the drawynge of thys swerde ys warned to all sauff all

only to you Also thys shippe a ryved in to realme of logrys and

that tyme was dedly warre be twene kyng Labor which was

fadir vnto the maymed kynge and kynge Hurlaine whych was


f. 391v (XVII.3-4)

 

a saresyn  But than was he newly crystened and so aftirwarde

hylde hym one of the worthyest men of the worlde And so vppon

a day hit be felle that kynge Labor and kynge Hurlaine had assem//

beled theire folke vppon the see where thys shippe was aryved & there

kynge Hurlaine was discomfite and hys men slayne And he was

a ferde to be dede and fledde to thys shippe and Þer founde Þis swerde

and drew hit // And cam oute and founde kynge Labor the man

of the worlde of all crystyn in whom there the grettist faythe And

whan kynge Hurlaine was discomfite and hys menne slayne

and and he was a ferde to be dede and fledde to thys shippe and

there founde thys swerde and drew hit and smote hym vppon the

helme so harde that he clave hym and hys horse to the hede with

the firste stroke of hys swerde and hit was in the realme of logris

And so be felle there grete pestilence and grete harme to bothe Reall//

mys for Þer encresed noÞer corne ne grasse noÞer well nye no fruyte

ne in the watir was founde no fyssh there fore men calle hit

the londys of the ij· marchys the waste londe for that dolerous

stroke And whan kynge Hurlaine saw thys swerde so kervay//

ynge he turned a gayne to fecch the scawberd And so cam in

to thys shippe and entird and put vp the swerde in Þe sheethe

And as sone as he had done hit he felle downe dede a fore the

bedde Thus was the swerde preved that neuer man drew hit

but he were dede or maymed // So lay he here tyll a maydyn

cam In to the shippe and caste hym oute for Þer was no man so

hardy in the worlde to entir in that for the defens And Þan

be hylde they the scawberte hit be semyd to be of a serpentis skynne

and there on were lettirs of golde and syluer And the gurdyll

was but porely to com to and nat able to susteyne such a ryche

swerde and the lettirs seyde he whych shall welde me ouȝt

to be more hardy than ony oÞer if he beare me as truly as me


f. 392 (XVII.4 )

 

ouȝte to be borne // For the body of hym which I ouȝt to hange by

he shall nat be shamed in no place whyle he ys gurde with the

gurdyll noÞer neuer none be so hardy to do a way thys gurdyll

for hit ouȝt nat to be done a way but by the hondis of a mayde

and that she be a kyngis doughter & a quenys And she must be

a mayde all the dayes of her lyff both· in wyll and In worke

And if she breke hir virginite she shall dy the moste vylaynes

deth· that euer dud ony woman // Sir seyde sir Percivale turne thys

swerde that we may se what ys on the oÞer syde and hit was rede

os bloode with blacke lettirs as ony cole that seyde he that shall

prayse me moste moste shall he fynde me to blame at a grete nede

And to whom I sholde be moste debonayre shall I be moste felon

and that shall be at one tyme ony fayre broÞer seyde she to Sir

Percyvale hit be felle afftir a fourty yere aftir the passion of ou

lorde Jhu cryste that Nacien thy brothir in law of kyng Mordre

was bore in a towne more Þan xiiij· dayes Journey frome his con

tray by the commaundemente of oure lorde in to an yle in to the

partyes of the weste that men clepith the Ile of Turnaunce So be

felle hit he founde thys shippe at the entre of a roche and he

founde the bedde and the swerde as we haue now Nat for Þan

he had nat so much hardynesse to draw hit and Þer he dwelle

an viij dayes and at the nynyth day there felle a grete wynd

whych departed hym oute of the Ile and brouȝt hym to a noÞer

Ile by a roche And there he founde the grettist gyaunte Þat euer

man myght see And there with cam that horrible gyaunte

to sle hym and than he loked a boute hym and myght nat

fle Also he had no thyng where with to defende hym but at Þe

laste he ran to the swerde and whan he save hit naked he

praysed hit muche and than he shooke hit and Þer with hit brake 


f. 392v (SVII.4-5)

 

in the myddys A seyde Nacien the thynge that I moste praysed ouȝt

Inow moste to blame and there with he threw the pecis of Þe swerde

ouer hys bedde and aftir that he lepe ouer the bourde to fyght with the

gyaunte and slew hym and anone he entirde in to the shyppe

a gayne and the wynde arose and drove hym thorow the see that

by aduenture he cam to a noÞer shippe where kynge Mordrayns

was whych had bene tempted full evyll with the fynde in Þe porte

of perelous roche and whan that one saw Þater they made grete

ioy aythir of othir and so they tolde eche oÞer of Þer aduenture & how

the swerde fayled hym at hys moste nede // So whan Mordrayns

saw the swerde he praysed hit muche but the brekyng was do by

wyckednesse of thy selff ward for Þou arte in som synne And Þer he

toke the swerde and sette the pecis to gydirs and they were as

fayre I sowdred as euer they were to fore and than he put Þe swerde

in the sheeth a yen and leyde hit downe on the bedde // Than herde

 hey a voyce that seyde go ye oute of thys shippe a litill whyle &

entir in to that othir for drede ye falle in dedly synne for and ye

be founde in dedely synne ye may nat ascape but perishe And so

they wente in to the othir shippe and as Nacyen wente ouer the

bourde he was smytten with a swerde on the ryght foote that he

felle downe noselynge to the shippe bourde And there with he seyde

 good lorde how am I hurte than Þer cam a voice that seyde take

Þou Þat for thy forfette that Þou dyddist in drawynge of Þis swerde

there fore Þou hast resseyved a wounde for Þou were neuer worthy

to handyll hit the wrytynge makith mencion In the name of

god seyde Sir Galahad ye ar ryght wyse of thes workes Sir seyde

she there was a kynge that hyght Pelleaus which men called

the maymed kynge and whyle he myght ryde he supported

much crystyndom and holy chyrche so vppon a day he hunted

in a woode of hys owne whych lasted vnto the see so at Þe laste he


f. 393 (XVII.5)

 

loste hys howndys and hys knyghtes sauff only one & he So he and his

knyght wente tyll that they cam towar^d Irelonde and there he founde

the shippe And whan he saw the lettirs and vndirstood them yet

he entird for he was ryght perfite of lyff but hys knyght had no har//

dynes to entir and there founde he thys swerde and knew hit oute

as much· as ye may se // So there with entirde a spere where with he

was smytten thorow both thyȝes and neuer sith myght he be heled ne

nouȝt shall to fore we com to hym Thus seyde she was kyng Pel

les youre graunte syre maymed for hys hardynes In the name of

god damesell seyde Sir Galahad· So they wente towarde Þe bedde

to be holde all a boute hit and a bovyn the bed Þer hynge ij swerdys

Also there were spyndelys whych were whyght as snowe and othir

that were rede as bloode and othir a bovyn grene as ony emerawde

of thes iij· colowres were thes spyndyls and of naturall coloure with

In and with oute ony paytynge Thes spyndyls seyde the damesell

was whan synfull Eue cam to gadir fruyte for which Adam &

she were put oute of paradyse she toke with her the bowȝ whych the

appyll hynge on Than perseyved she that the braunche was freysh

and grene and she remembird of the losse which cam of the tre·

Than she thouȝt to kepe the braunche as longe as she myght and

for she had no coffir to kepe hit In she put hit in the erthe So by Þe

wylle of oure lorde the braunche grew to a grete tre with In a litill

whyle and was as whyght as ony snowe braunchis bowis and

levys that was a tokyn that a maydyn planted hit But affter Þat

oure lorde com to Adam and bade hym know hys wyff fleyshly

as nature requyred // So lay Adam with hys wyff vndir Þe same

tre And anone the tre which was whyght felle to grene as ony

grasse and all that com oute of hit And in the same tyme that

they medled to gydirs Abell was be gotyn Thus was the tre

longe of grene coloure And so aftir be felle many dayes vndir


f. 393v (XVII.5-6)

 

the same tre Cayine slew Abell where of be fe felle grete meruayle for a

Abell had ressayved dethe vndir the grene tre he loste the grene colour

and be cam rede and that was in tokenyng of blood and anone

all the plantis dyed Þer off but the tre grewe and waxed meruaylusly

fayre and hit was the moste fayryst tre & the most delectable Þou

ony man myght be holde and se and so ded the plantes Þat grewe

oute of hit to fore that Abell was slayne vndir hit And so longe

dured the tre tyll that Salamon kynge Danyth ys sonne regned

and hylde the londe aftir his fadir // So thys Salamon was wyse

and knew all the vertues of stonys and treys Also he knew the

course of the stirres and of many oÞer dyuers thynges So this Sala//

mon had an euyll wyff where thorow he wente Þer had be no

good woman borne and there fore he dispysed Þem in hys bookis

So Þer answerde a voice that seyde to hym Þus Salamon if hevy//

nesse com to a man by a woman ne rek Þo neuer for yet shall Þer

com a woman where of Þer shall com gretter Joy to a man an C·

tymes than thys hevynesse gyvith sorow And that woma shall

be borne of thy lynayge // So whan Salamon harde thes wordis

he hylde hym self but a foole That preff had he by olde bookis

the trouÞe Also the holy goste shewed hym the commynge of Þe glorius

virgyne mary Than asked he the voyce if hit sholde be in Þe yarde

of hys lynayge Nay seyde the voyce but Þer shall com a man which

shall be a mayde and laste of youre bloode and he shall be as

good a knyght as deuke Josue thy broÞer in law Now haue I

sertefyed the of that Þou stondist in doute Than was Salamon

gladde that Þer shulde com ony suche of hys lynayge but euer he meruay//

led and Andred who that sholde be and what hys name my

myght be So hys wyff perceyved that he studyed and Þouȝt she

wolde know at som season and so she wayted hir tyme & cam


f. 394 (XVII.6)

 

to hym and asked hym and there he tolde her all to gydir how Þe

voice had tolde hym // well seyde she I shall lette make a shippe of the

beste wood and moste durable that ony man may fynde So Salamon

sente for carpenters of all the londe the beste and whan they had

made the shippe the lady seyde to Salamon Sir syn hit ys so Þat thys

knyght ouȝte to passe all knyghtes of chevalry whych hath bene to

fore hym and shall com afftir hym More ouer I shall lerne you

seyde she ye shall go in to oure lordis temple where ys kyng Da//

vith his swerde youre fadir whych ys Þe mervaylouste & Þe sherpyste

that euer was takyn in ony knyghtes hondys there fore take ye that

and take off the pomelle and Þer to make ye a pomell of precious stonys

late hit be so suttelly made that no man perceyve hit but that Þey beth

all one And aftir make there an hylte so mervaylously that no

man may know hit and aftir that make a meruaylous sheeÞe And

whan ye haue made all thys I shall lette make a gurdyll Þer to

such one as shall please me // So all thys kyng Salamon ded lat

make as she devised bothe the shippe and all the remenaunte & whan

the shippe was redy in the see to sayle the lady lete make a grete bedde

and meruaylous ryche and sette hir vppon the beddis hede couerde with

and leyde the swerde at the feete and the gurdyls were of hempe

And there with the kynge was ryght angry / Sir wyte you welle that

I haue none so hyȝe a thynge whych were worthy to susteyne and Þer

she lete make a couerynge to the shippe of clothe of sylke that sholde neuer

rotte for no manner of wedir Than thys lady wente and made a car//

pynter to com to the tre whych· Abelle was slayne vndir Now seyde

she carve me oute of thys tre as much· woode as woll make me a

spyndill A madam seyde he thys ys the tre which oure firste modir

planted Do hit sayd she oÞer ellis I shall destroy the Anone as he be

gan to worke there com oute droppis of blood and Þan wolde he a

leffte but she wolde nat suffir hym and so he toke as muche woode

as myght make a spyndyll And so she made hym to take as muche


f. 394v (XVII.6-7)

 

of the grene tre and so of the whyght tre And whan thes sir iij spyndyls

were shapyn she made hem to be fastened vppon the Syler of the bedde

So whan Salamon saw thys he seyde to hys wyff ye haue done mer//

uaylously for Þouȝe all the worlde were here ryght now they cowde

nat devise where fore all thys was made but oure lorde hym selff

And Þou Þat haste done hit wote nat what hit shall be tokyn Now lat

hyt be seyde she for ye shall hyre paraventure tydynges sonner Þan ye wend

Now here ys a wondir tale of kyng Salamon and of hys wyll·

That nyght lay Salamon be fore the shippe with litill felyship

and whan he was on slepe hym thouȝt Þer com from hevyn

a grete company of angels and a lyght in to the shippe and toke water

whych was brouȝt by an angell in a vessell of Syluer and be sprente

all the shippe And aftir he cam to the swerde and drew lettyrs of the

hylte and aftir wente to the shippe bourde and wrote Þerer lettirs

whych· seyde Þou man that wolte entir with In me be ware Þat Þou be

fulle in the faythe for I ne am but fayth and be lyve // whan Sala

mon aspyed Þos lettirs he was so a baysshed that he dirst nat entir

and so he drew hym a backe And the shippe was anone shovyn

in the see he wente so faste that he had loste the syght of hym with In

a litill whyle And Þan a voyce seyde Salamon the laste knyght of

thy kynred shall reste in hys bedde Than wente Salamon and a

waked hys wyff and tolde her the aduentures of thys shipp Now

seyth· the tale that a grete whyle iij· felowis be hylde the bed and Þe

iij· spyndyls than they were at a sertayne that they were of naturall

coloures with oute ony payntynge Than they lyfft vp a cloth· which

was a bove the grounde and there founde a rych parse be semyng

And Sir Percivale toke hit and founde Þer In a wrytte and so he rad

hit and deuysed the maner of the spyndils and of the ship whens hit

cam and by whom hit was made Now seyde Sir Galahad where

shall we fynde the Jantill woman that shall make new gurdyls to Þe


f. 395 (XVII.7)

 

swerde Fayre sirres seyde Percivallis syster dismay Þou nat for by the leve

of god I shall lette make a gurdyll to the swerde such one as sholde longe

Þer to And than opynde she a boxe and toke oute gurdils which were

semely wrought goldyn thredys and vppon that were sette full of precius

stonys and a ryche buckyll of golde Lo lordys she seyde here ys a gur//

dill that ouȝt  to be sette a boute the swerde and wete you well Þe

grettist parte of thys gurdyll was made of my hayre whych sonne

tyme I loued well whyle that I was woman of the worlde // But

as sene as I wyste that thys aduenture was ordayned me I clip//

ped off my heyre and made thys gurdyll in the name of god ye be

well I founde seyde Sir Bors for serteyse ye haue put vs oute off

grete payne where In we sholde haue entirde ne had your tydyngis

beÞ // Than wente the Jantill woman and sette hit on the gurdyll

of the swerde // Now seyde the felyship what ys the name of Þe swerde

and what shall we calle hit Truly seyde she the name of Þe swerde

ys the swerde with the straunge gurdyls and the seeth· mevear of blood

for no man that hath blood in hym ne shall neuer see that one party

of the sheth· whych was made of the tree of lyff Than Þey seyde sir

Galahad in the name of Jhu cryste we pray you to gurde you with

thys swerde which hath bene desyred so much· in the Realme of Lo//

grys Now latte me be gynne seyde Galahad to grype thys swerde

for to gyff you corrayge // But wete you well hit longith no more

to me than hit doth to you and than he gryped a boute hit with his

fyngirs a grete dele and than she gurte hym a boute Þe myddyll

with the swerde Now recke I nat though I dye for now I holde

me one of the beste blyssed maydyns of the worlde whych hath

made me one of the worthyest knyghtes of the worlde Damesell

seyde Sir Galahad ye haue done so muche that I shall be your knyȝt

all the dayes of my lyff Than they wente frome that ship and

wente to the oÞer and anone the wynde droff hem in to the see

a grete pace but they had no vytayle So hit be felle that Þey cam


f. 395v (XVII.7-8)

 

on the morne to a castell that men calle Carteloyse that was in the

marchys of scotlonde And whan they had passed the porte Þe Jantill

woman seyde lordys here be men a Ryven that and they wyst Þat and

he were of kynge Arthurs courte ye shulde be assayled anone well

damesell dismay you nat seyde Sir Galahad for he that cast vs

oute of the rocche shall delyuer vs frome hem // So hit be felle as Þey

talked Þus to gydir there cam a squyre by them and asked what

they were Sir we ar of kyng Arthus howse ys that sothe seyde he

Now be my hede seyd he ye be evyll arayde and than turned a

gayne vnto the chyff fortresse and with In a whyle they harde an

horne blow· Than a Jantill woman cam to hem and asked

Þem of whens they were Anone they tolde her Now fayre

lordys she seyde for goddys love turnyth a gayne if ye may for

ye be com to youre dethe // Nay for soth they seyde we woll nat turne

a gayne for he shulde helpe vs in to whos seruyse we were entred

In // So as they stoode talkynge there cam x knyghteswell armed

and bade hem yelde othir ellis dye // That yeldyng seyde Þey shall

be noyous vnto you And there with they lete Þer horsis renne and

Sir Percivale smote the firste that he bare hym to the erth· and toke

hys horse and be strode hym And the same wyse dud Sir Gala//

had and all Sir Bors serued a noÞer so for they had no horse in that

contrey for they lefft Þer horsys whan they toke Þer shippe And so

whan they were horsed than be gan they to sette vppon them

and they of the castell fledde in to stronge fertressis and Þes iij

knyghtes aftir them in to the castell and so a lyȝt on foote and with

Þer swerdis slew them downe and gate in to the halle Than

whan they be helde the grete multitude of the people that they

had slayne they helde them self grete synners Sertes seyde sir

Bors I wene and god had loved them that we sholde nat haue


f. 396 (XVII.8)

 

had power to haue slayne hem Þus but they haue done so muche

a gayne oure lorde that he wolde nat suffir hem to regne no lenger

yee say nat so seyde Galahad first if they mysse ded a yenst god Þe

vengeaunce ys nat owris but to hym which hath power Þer off

So cam Þer oute of a chambir a good man which was a preste &

bare goddis body in a cuppe and whan he saw hem whych lay dede

in the halle he was a baysshed Anone Sir Galahad ded of hys &

kneled a downe and so dud hys ij· felowis // Sir seyde they haue ye

no drede of vs for we bene of Kynge Arthurs courte Than asked

the good man how they were slayne so suddaynly and they tolde hym

Trulys seyde the good man and ye myght lyve as longe as Þe worlde

myght endure ne myght ye haue done so grete almys dede as Þis

Sir seyde Sir Galahad I repente me gretely In as much· as they

were crystynde Nay repente you nat seyde he for they were nat

crystynde And I shall telle you how that I know of thys castell

here was a lorde erle whos name was Hernoy nat but one yere

and he had iij sonnys good knyghtes of armys and a douȝter Þe fayrist

Jantill woman that men knew So Þo ijj iij· knyghtes loued Þer syster

so sore that they brente in love and so they lay by her magre Þer

hede And for she cryed to hir fadir they slew her and toke Þer fadir

and put hym in preson and wounded hym nye to the deth· but

Cosyn of hors rescowed hym And than ded they grete vntrouthe

for they slew clerkis and prestis and made bete downe chapellis

that oure lordys seruyse myght nat be seyde // And thys same day

her fadir sente vnto me for to be confessed and howseled but such·

shame had neuer man as I had thys same day with Þe iij· breÞerne

but the olde erle made me to suffir for the seyde they shold nat longe

endure for iij· seruauntes of oure lorde sholde destroy them And now

hit ys brought to an ende and by thys may Þou wete Þat oure lorde

ys nat displesed with youre dedis // Sertes seyde sir Galahad and hit


f. 396v (XVII.8-9)

 

had nat pleased oure lorde neuer sholde we haue slayne so many men

in so litill a whyle And they brought the erle Hernoy oute of preson

in to the myddis of the hall the which knew well sir Galahad and

yet he sye hym neuer be fore but by revelacion of oure lorde // Than

be gan he to wepe ryght tendirly and seyde longe haue I abyddyn

youre commynge but for goddis love holdith me in youre armys Þat

my soule may departe oute of my body In so good a mannys armys

as ye be full gladly seyde Sir Galahad And Þan one seyde on

hyght that all folke harde Sir Galahad well hast Þou ben a

venged g on goddis enemyes Now be hovith the to go to Þe maymed

kynge as sone as Þou mayste for he shall ressayve by the helth

whych he hath a byddyn so longe and there with the soule departed

frome the body And Sir Galahad made hym to be buryed as

hym ought to be // Ryght so departed the iij· knyghtes And sir Percivallis

syster with them and so they cam in to a waste foreyst and there

they saw a fore them a whyght herte which iiij· lyons lad Than

they toke hem to assente for to folow aftir to know whydir they

repayred And so the^y rode aftir a grete pase tyll that Þey cam to

a valey and there by was an Ermytayge where a good man

dwelled And the herte and the lyons entirde also whan they

saw all thys they turned to the chapell and saw Þe good man

in a relygious wede and in the armour of oure lorde for he wolde

synge masse of the holy goste and so they entird In and herde

masse and at the secretis of the masse they iij· saw the herte be

com a man which mervayled hem and sette hym vppon Þe awter

in a ryche sete and saw the iiij· lyons were chaunged // One

to the fourme of man anoÞer to the fourme of a lyon and

the tirde to an egle and the iiij· was changed to an oxe Than

toke they her sete where the harte sate and wente oute Þorow

a glasse wyndow and there was not thynge perisshed noÞer brokyn

 

 

 

                                                                And Þey harde


f. 397 (XVII.9-10)

 

And they harde say in such maner Entred the sonne of god in to the

wombe of maydyn mary whos virginite ne was perisshed ne

hurte And whan they harde thes wordis they felle downe to

the erthe and were a stoned and there with was a grete clerenesse

And whan they were com to Þer selff a gayne they wente to the

good man and prayde hym that he wolde sey them the trouthe

of that vision // why what thynge haue ye sene Anone Þey tolde

hym all / A lordys seyde he ye be well com · for now wote I well

ye beth the good knyghtes whych shall brynge the Sankgreall

to an ende for ye bene they vnto whom oure lorde shall shew grete

secretis and well ought oure lorde be signfyed to an harte // For

the harte whan he ys olde he waxith yonge a gayne in his whyȝt

skynne Ryght so commyth a gayne oure lorde frome deth to lyff for

he lost erthely fleysshe that was the dedly fleyssh whych he had

takyn in the wombe of the blyssed virgyne mary And for that

cause appered oure lorde as a whyght harte with oute spot And

the iiij that were with hym ys to vndirstonde the iiij· euaungelistis

which sette in w^rytynge a parte of Jhu crystes dedys that he dud som

tyme whan he was a monge you an erthely man for wete you

welle neuer arst ne myght no knyght knowe the trouthe for oftyn

tymes or thys hath oure lorde shewed hym vnto good men and to

good knyghtes in lyknesse of an herte // But I suppose frome hense

forthe ye shall se hit no more and than they Joyed much· and

dwelled there all day And vppon the morne whan they had

herde masse they departed and commended the good man to god And

so they cam to a castell and passed So Þer cam a knyght armed

aftir them and seyde lordys Thys Jantill woman Than ye lede

with you ys ^she a mayde ye sir seyde she a mayde I am Than he toke

hir by the brydyll and seyde by the holy crosse ye shall nat ascape

me to fore ye haue yolden the custum of thys castell // Lat her go


f. 397v (XVII.10)

 

seyde sir Percivale ye be nat wyse for a mayde in what place she commyÞe

ys fre // So in the meane whyle there cam oute a x· or xij· knyȝtes

armed oute of the castell and with hem cam Jantill women Þe

which hylde a dyssh of syluer and than they seyde thys Jantill

woman muste yelde vs the custom of thys castell // why seyde Þe

Sir Gallahad what ys the custom of thys castell Sir seyde a knyȝt

what mayde passith· here by sholde hylde thys dyshe full of bloode

of hir ryght arme blame haue he seyde Galahad that brought

vp such customs and so god save me also sure mow ye be Þat of this

Jantill women shall ye sayle whyle that I haue hele // So god

me helpe seyde Sir Percivale I had leuer be slayne / And I also seyde

Sir Bors Be my fayth seyde the knyght than shall ye dye for

ye mow nat endure a yenste vs Þouȝe ye were the beste knyghtes

of the worlde Than lette they ren ech horse to oÞer and Þis iij·

knyghtes bete they x· knyghtes and Þan set Þer hondis to Þer swerdis

and bete them downe Than Þer cam oute of the castell a Sixty

knyghtes armed Now fayre lordis seyde thes iij· knyghtes haue

mercy on youre selff and haue nat a do with vs // Nay fayre lordes

seyde the knyghtes of the castell we counceyle you to with drawe

you for ye ben the beste knyghtes of the worlde and Þer fore do no

more for ye haue done I now // we woll lat you go with thys harme

but we muste nedys haue the custum Sertes seyde Sir Galahad

for nouȝte speke ye // well sey they woll ye dye // Sir we be nat yet

com Þer to seyde Sir Galahad than be gan they to meddyll to gydirs

And Sir Galahad with the straunge gurdyls drew his swerde

and smote on the ryght honde and on the lyffte honde And slew

whom that euer a bode hym And dud so mervaylously Þat they

had mervayle of hym and hys ij· felowis holpe hym passyngly

well and so they helde Þer Journey euerych in lycke harde tyll hit

was nyȝe nyght Than muste they nedis departe // So Þer cam a


f. 398 (XVII.10-11)

 

good knyght and seyde to thes iij· knyghtes if ye woll com In to nyȝt

and take such herberow as here ys ye shall be ryght well com and

we shall ensure you by the fayth· of oure bodyes and as we be trew

knyghtes to leve you in such a state to morow as here we fynde you

with oute ony falsehode And as sone as ye know of the custom we

dare sey we woll accorde there fore for goddis love seyde the Jantyll

woman go we thydir and spare nat for me // well go we seyde sir

Galahad and so they entird in to the castell and whan they were

a lyght they made grete Joy of hem // So with In a whyle the iij·

knyghtes asked the custom of the castell and where fore hit was vsed

Sir what hit ys we woll sey you the sothe There ys in this castell

a Jantill woman whych both· we and thys castell ys hers and

many oÞer So hit be felle many yerys a gone there happened on her

a malodye And whan she had lyene a grete whyle she felle vn//

to a mesell and no leche cowde remedye her But at the laste

an olde man sayde and she myght haue a dyssh fulle of bloode

of a maydyn and a clene virgyne in wylle and in worke And

a kynges douȝter that bloode sholde be her helth for to a noynte

her with all and for thys thynge was thys custom made // Now

seyde Sir Percivallis sister fayre knyghtes I se well that Þis Jantill

woman ys but dede with oute helpe and Þer fore lette me blede Sertes

seyde Sir Galahad and ye blede so muche ye mon dye Truly seyd

she and I dye for the helth· of her I shall gete me grete worship

and soule helthe and worship to my lynayge and better ys one

harme than twayne and Þer fore Þer shall no more batayle be but

to morne I shall you youre custom of this castell And Þan Þer was

made grete Joy ouer there was made to fore For ellis had Þer bene

mortall warre vppon the morne nat with stondynge she wolde

none oÞer wheÞer they wolde or nolde so that nyght were Þes iij

felowis eased with the beste and on the morne they harde masse


f. 398v (XVII.11)

 

and Sir Percivalis sister bade them brynge forth the syke lady so she

was brought forth whych was full evyll at ease // than seyde she who

shall lette me bloode // So one cam furthe and lette her bloode and she

bled so muche that the dysshe was fulle Than she lyfft vp her honde

and blyssed her and seyde to thys lady Madame I am com to my

dethe for to hele you there fore for goddis love prayeth for me And            

with that she felle in a sowne Than Sir Galahad and his ij felowis               

sterte vp to her and lyffte hir vp and staunched hir blood but she had                   

bled so muche that she myght nat lyve So whan she was a waked                   

she seyde fayre brothir Sir Percivale I dye for the helynge of this lady                       

And whan I am dede I requyre you that ye burye me nat in thys contrey

but as sone as I am dede putte me in a boote at the nexte haven and lat

me go as aventures woll lede me and as sone as ye iij· com to Þe cite

of Sarras there to enchyeve the ho holy grayle ye shall fynde me

vndir a towre aryved and the bury me in the spirituall palyse

for I shall telle you for trouthe there shall Sir Galahad shall

be buryed and ye bothe in the same place Whan Sir Percivale

vndirstoode thes wordis he graunted hir all wepynly And Þan

seyde a voice vnto Þem lordis to morow at the owre of pryme

ye iij· shall departe euerych frome oÞer tylle the aventure brynge you

vnto the maymed kynge Than asked she her saveoure and as

sone as she had reseyved hym the soule departed frome the body

So the same day was the lady heled whan she was anoynted

with hir bloode Than Sir Percivale made a lettir of all that she had

helpe them as in stronge aventures and put hit in hir yght

honde and so leyde hir in a barge and couerde hit with blacke sylke

and so the wynde arose and droff the barge frome the londe

and all maner of knyghtes be hylde hit tyll hit was oute of Þer

syght // Than they drew all to the castell and furÞe with Þer fylle

a tempeste suddeyne of thundir & lyghtnynge & rayne as all Þe

erthe wolde a brokyn // So halff the castell turned vp so downe


f. 399 (XVII.11-12)

 

So hyt passyd evyn songe or the tempest were seased Than they saw

to fore hem a knyght armed and wounded harde in the body & in Þe

hede whych seyde a good lorde succour me for now hit ys nede So after

thys knyght there cam a noÞer knyght and a dwarff whych cryed to

hem a farre stonde ye may nat ascape Than the wounded knyȝt

hylde vp hys hondys and prayde god he myght nat dye in suche

tribulacion Truly seyde Sir Galahad I shall succour hym for his

sake that he callith on // Sir seyde sir Bors I shall do hit for hit ys

nat for you for he ys but one knyght Sir Seyde he I graunte you

So sir Bors toke hys swerde and commaunded hym to god and rode after

to rescow the wounded knyght

Now turne we to Sir Galahad and to Sir Percivall

NOw turnyth the tale vnto sir Galahad & sir percivall Þat were

in a chapell all nyght in hir prayers for to save hem Sir

Bors So on the morow they dressed them in Þer harneys toward

the castell to wete what was fallyn of of them And whan Þey

cam there they founde noÞer man noÞer woman that he ne was dede

by the vengeaunce of oure lorde So with that they harde a voice

that seyde thys vengeaunce ys for bloode shedynge of maydyns Also

they founde at the ende of the castell a chirche yarde And Þer In

they myght se a Sixti fayre tumbis and that place was fayre

and so delectable that hit semed hem Þer had bene no tempeste

And there lay the bodyes of all the good maydyns which were

martirde for the syke lady Also they founde Þer namys of ech lady

and of what bloode they were com off and all were of kyngys

bloode and xj of them were kynges doughtirs // Than departed they &

wente in to a foreyste Now seyde Sir percivale vnto sir Galahad

we muste departe and there fore pray we oure lorde that we

may mete to gydirs in shorte tyme Than they ded of Þer helmys

and kyssed to gydir and sore wepte at theyre departynge

Now turnyth thys tale vnto Sir Launcelott ·~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~


f. 399v (XVII.13)

 

NOw seyth the tale that whan Sir Launcelot was com to Þe

watir of Mortays as hit ys reherced be fore he was in grete

perell and so he leyde hym downe and slepte and toke the aventure

that god wolde sende hym So whan he was a slepe Þer cam a vision         

vnto hym that seyde sir Launcelot aryse vp and take thyne armour           

and entir in to the firste shippe that Þou shalt fynde And whan he                    

herde thes wordys he sterte vp and saw grete clerenesse a boute

hym And than he lyffte vp hys honde and blyssed hym // And so

toke hys armys and made hym redy and at the laste he cam by

a stronde and founde a shippe with oute sayre sayle oÞer ore And as

sone as he was with In the shippe Þer he had the moste swettnes Þat

euer he felte and he was fulfylled with all thynge that he Þouȝt

on oÞer desyred / Than he seyde swete fadir Jhu cryste I wote natt

what Joy I am In for thys passith all erthely Joyes that euer I was

In And so in thys Joy leyde hym downe to the shippe bourde and

slepte tyll day And whan he a wooke he founde there a fayre bed

and ther In lyynge a Jantill woman dede which was sir Percivalles

sister And as Sir Launcelot avised her he aspyed in hir ryght

honde whych he rad that tolde hym all the aventures that ye ha//

ve herde be fore And of what lynayge she was com So with thys

Jantill woman Sir Launcelot was a moneth· and more if ye wold

aske how he lyved for he that fedde the chyldirn of Jrslm with manna

in deserte so was he fedde // For euery day whan he had seyde hys

hys prayers he was susteyned with the grace of the holy goste // &

so on a day he wente to play hym by the watirs syde for he was

som what wery of the shippe and than he lystened and herde an

com and one rydyng vppon hym and whan he cam nyȝe hym

semed a knyght and so he late hym passe and wente there as Þe

ship was and there he a lyȝt and toke the sadyll and the brydill

& put the horse frome hym and so wente in to the shyppe And

than Sir Launcelot and dressed hym vnto the shippe and seyde Sir

f

 

f. 401 (XVII.14-15)

 

trustist Þou more on thy harneyse thatn In thy maker for he

myght more avayle the than thyne armour in what seruyse

that Þou arte sette In // Than seyde Sir Launcelot fayre fader

Jhu cryste I thanke the of thy grete mercy that Þou reprevyst

me of my mysse dede Now se I that Þou holdiste me for one

of thy seruauntes than toke he hys swerde a gayne and put hit

vp in hys sheethe and made a crosse in hys forehede and cam to

the lyons and they made sembelaunte to do hym harme · Nat

withstondynge he passed by them with oute hurte & entird

in to the castell to the chyeff fortresse And there were Þey all

at reste Than Sir Launcelot entred so armed for he founde

no gate nor doore but hit was opyn And at the laste he founde

a chambir where of the doore was shutte and he sett hys

honde Þer to to haue opened hit but he myght nat Than he

enforced hym myckyll to vndo the doore Than he lystened

and herde a voice whych sange so swetly that hit semede

none erthely thynge And hym thouȝt the voice seyde Joy &

honoure be to the fadir of hevyn Than Sir Launcelot kneled

a downe to fore the chambir dore for well wyst he that Þer

was the Sankgreall with In that chambir Than seyde he

fayre swete fadir Jhu cryste if euer I dud thynge that plesed

the lorde for thy pite ne haue nat in dispite for my synnes

done by fore tyme and that Þou shew me som thynge of that

I seke and with that he saw the chambir dore opyn and Þer

cam oute a grete clerenesse that the house was as bryght

as all the tourcheis of the worlde had bene there // So cam

he to the chambir doore and wolde haue entird And a none

a voice seyde vnto hym Sir Launcelot flee and entir nat

for Þou ouȝt nat to do hit for and if Þou entir you shalt for


f. 401v (XVII.15)

 

hit thynke hit Than he with drew hym a back ryght hevy // Than

loked he vp in to the myddis of the chambir and saw a table of syluer

and the holy vessell couerde with rede Samyte and many angels

a boute hit where of one hylde a candyll of wexe brennynge and

the oÞer hylde a crosse and the ornementis of an awter and be fore

the holy vessell he saw a good man clothed as a pryste And hit

semed that he was at the sakerynge of the masse And hit semed        

to sir Launcelot that a bove the prystis hondys were iij· men where     

of the ij put the yongyste by lyknes be twene the prystes hondis and         

so he lyffte them vp ryght hyȝe And hit semed to shew so to the            

peple And than Sir Launcelot mervayled nat a litill for hym                 

thouȝt the pryste was so gretly charged of the vygoure Þat hym                 

semed that he sholde falle to the erth· and whan he saw none             

a boute hym that wolde helpe hym Than com he to the dore a                  

grete pace and seyde fayre fadir Jhu cryste ne take hit for no                 

synne if I helpe the good man whych hath grete nede of helpe

Ryght so entird he in to the chambir and cam toward Þe table

of syluer and whan he cam nyȝe hit he felte a breeth Þat hym

thouȝt hit was entromedled with fyre which smote hym so

sore in the vysayge that hym thouȝt hit brente hys vysayge

and there with he felle to the erthe and had no power to aryse

as he that had loste the power of hys body and hys hyrynge

and syght // Than felte he many hondys whych toke hym vp

and bare hym oute of the chambir doore and leffte hym Þer

semynge dede to all people So vppon the morow whan hit

was fayre day they with In were rysen and founde Sir

Launcelot Lyynge be fore the chambir doore All they meruayled

how that he com In and so they loked vppon hym and felte

hys powse to wete whethir were ony lyff in hym and so Þey


f. 402 (XVII.15-16)

 

founde lyff in hym but he myght nat stonde noÞer stirre no membir

that he had and so they toke hym by euery parte of the body and bare

hym In to a chambir and leyde hym in a Rych· bedde farre frome

folke and so he lay iiij· dayes // Than one seyde he was on lyve

and a noÞer seyde nay he was dede // In the name of god seyde an

olde man I do you veryly to wete he ys nat dede but he ys as

fulle of lyff as the strengyst of vs all there fore I rede you all

that he be well kepte tylle god sende lyff in hym a gayne Som

such maner they kepte Sir Launcelot iiij· & xxti dayes and also

many nyghtis that euer he lay stylle as a dede man And at the

xxv· day be fylle hym aftir mydday that he opened hys yen

and whan he saw folke he made grete sorow and seyde why

haue ye a waked me for I was more at ease than I am now

A Jhu cryste who myght be so blyssed that myght se opynly thy

grete mervayles of secretnesse there where no synner may be

why haue ye sene seyde he grete mervayles that no tunge

may telle and more than ony herte cam thynke and had nat

my synne bene be fore tyme ellis I had sone muche more Than

they tolde hym how he had layne there iiij· & xxti dayes & nyȝtes

than hym thouȝt hit was ponyshemente for the iiijt· yere Þat

he had bene no synner // where fore oure lorde put hym in pe//

naunce the iiij· dayes and nyghtes Than loked Launcelot to fore

hym and saw the hayre whych he had borne nyȝe a yere for that

he for thouȝte hym ryght muche that he had brokyn his promyse

vnto the Ermyte whych he had a vowed to do // Than Þey asked

how stood with hym for sothe seyde he I am hole of body thanked

be oure lorde there fore for goddis love telle me where I am

Than seyde they all that he was in the castell of Carbonek

There with com a Jantill woman and brouȝt hym a shirte


f. 402v (XVII.16)

 

of small lynen clothe but he chaunged nat there but toke the hayre to

hym a gayne // Sir seyde they the queste of the Sankgreall ys enche//

ved now ryght in you and neuer shall ye se of Sankgreall more Þan ye

haue sene Now I thanke god seyde Sir Launcelot for hys grete mercy

of that I haue sene for hit suffisith me for as I suppose no man in

thys worlde haue lyved bettir than I haue done to enchyeve that

I haue done And there with he toke the hayre and clothed hym

in hit and a boven that he put a lynen and aftir that a roobe

of scarlet freyssh and new And whan he was so arayed they

mervayled all for they knew hym well that he was sir Launcelot

the good knyght and than they seyde all a my lorde sir Launcelott

ye be he And he seyde yee truly I am he Than cam worde to the

Kynge Pelles that the knyght that had layne so longe dede was

the noble knyght Sir Launcelot Than was the kynge ryȝt glad

and wente to se hym And whan sir Launcelot saw hym com

he dressed hym a yenste hym and Þan made the kynge grete Joy

of hym And there the kynge tolde hym tydyngeshow his fayre

douȝter was dede // Than Sir Launcelot was ryght hevy and

seyde me for thynkith of the deth of youre douȝter for she was a

full fayre lady freyshe and yonge and well I wote she bare the

beste knyght that ys now on erthe or that euer was syn god was

borne So the kynge hylde hym there iiij· dayes and on the

morow he toke hys leve at kynge Pelles and at all Þe felyship

and thanked them of the grete laboure Ryght so as they sate

at her dyner in the chyff halle hit be fylle that Þe Sangreall

had fulfylled the table with all metis that ony harte myȝ Þynke

And as they sate they saw all the doorys of the paleyse and

wyndowes opyn shutte with oute mannys honde So were they

all a baysshed // So a knyght whych was all armed cam to Þe

 

f. 403 (XVII.16-17)

 

that cam to the chyeff dore and one knocked and cryed vndo but

they wolde nat and euer he cryed vnto so hit noyed hem so much·

that the kynge hym selff a rose and cam to a wyndow there where

the knyght called / Than he seyde Sir knyght ye shall nat enter at

thys tyme // Whyle the Sankgreall ys hyre And there fore go

ye in to a nothir fortresse for ye be none of the knyghtes of Þe quest

but one of them whych · haue seruyd the fyende and haste leffte

the seruyse of oure lorde Than was he passynge wroth · at Þe

kynges wordis // Sir knyght seyde the kynge syn ye wolde so fayne

entir telle me of what contrey ye be // Sir he seyde I am of Þe

realme of Logrys and muy name ys Sir Ector de marys broÞer

vnto my lorde Sir Launcelot In the name of god seyde Þe kynge

me for thynkis seyde the kynge for youre broÞer ys here Inne //

whan sir Ector vndirstood that hys broÞer was Þer for he was

the man in the worlde that he moste drad and loved Than he

seyde a good lorde now dowblith my sorow and shame full truly

seyde the good man of the hylle vnto Sir Gawayne and to me

of oure dremys // Than wente he oute of the courte as faste as

hys horse myght and so thorow oute the castell Than kyng pelles

cam to Sir Launcelot and tolde hym tydynges of hys brothir A

none he was sory there fore that he wyst nat what to do So

sir Launcelot departed and toke hys armys and seyde he wold go

se the realme of Logris whych had nat sene a fore in a yere

and there with commaunded the kynge to god and so rode thorow

many realmys and at the laste he com to a whyght abbay &

there they made hym that nyght grete chere And on the morne

he arose and hard masse and a fore an awter he founde a ryche

tombe which was newly made and then he toke hede and saw

the sydys wryten with golde which seyde here lyeth · kyng Bag//

demagus of Gore which kynge Arthurs nevew slew and named


f. 403v (XVII.17-18)

 

hym Sir Gawayne Than was nat he a litill sory for sir Launcelot

loued hym muche more than ony oÞer and had hit bene ony oÞer Þan sir

Gawayne he sholde nat ascape frome the dethe and seyde to hym selff

A lorde god thys ys a grete hurte vnto kynge Arthurs courte the

losse of suche a man And than he departed and cam to the abbey where

Sir Galahad dud the aventure of the tombis and wan the whyȝt

shylde with the rede crosse and there had he grete chere all that nyȝt

and on the morne he turned to Camelot where he founde kynge

Arthure and the quene But many of the knyghtes of rounde table

were slayne and destroyed more Þan halff and so iij· of them were

com home Sir Ector Gawayne & Lyonell and many oÞer that nedith

nat now to reherce And all the courte were passyng glad of Sir

Launcelot and the kynge asked hym many tydyngis of hys sonne sir

Galahad And there Sir Launcelot tolde the kynge of hys aventures

that be felle hym syne he departed And also he tolde hym of Þe aven//

tures of Sir Galahad sir Percivale and sir Bors whych that he knew

by the lettir of the ded mayden And also as sir Galahad had tolde

hym Now god wolde seyde the kynge that Þey were all iij· here

That shall neuer be seyde Sir Launcelot for ij· of hem shall ye neuer

se But one of them shall com home a gayne //

Now levith thys tale and spekith of Sir Galahad·

NOw seyth the tale that Sir Galahad rode many Journeys

in vayne And at the laste he com to the abbay where

kynge Mordrayns was and whan he harde that he thouȝte he

wolde a byde to se hym And so vppon the morne whan he had herd

masse Sir Galahad com vnto kynge Mordrayns And anone Þe kyng

saw hym whych had layne blynde of longe tyme and Þan he dres//

sed hym a yenste hym And seyde Sir Galahad the seruaunte of Jhu

cryste and verry knyght whos commynge I haue a byddyn longe

now enbrace me and lette me reste on thy breste So that I may

reste be twene thyne armys for Þou arte a clene virgyne a bove

all knyghtes as the floure of the lyly in whom virginite is signified


f. 404 (XVII.18)

 

and Þou arte the rose which ys the floure of all good vertu & In colour

of all good vertu fyre for the fyre of the holy goste ys takyn so in the

that my fleyssh whych was all dede of oldenes ys be com a gayne

yonge // whan Sir Galahad harde thes wordys than he enbraced

hym and all hys body Than seyde he fayre lorde Jhu cryste now

I haue my wylle I now I requyre the in thys poynte that I am In

Þat Þou cam and visite me And anone oure lorde herde his prayere

and there with the soule departed frome the body And Þan sir Galahad

put hym in the erthe as a kynge ouȝte to be and so departed and cam

in to a perelous foreyste where he founde the welle which boyled

with grete wawis as the tale tellith to fore // And as sone as Sir

Galahad sette hys honde Þer to hit seased so that hit brente no more

and anone the hete departed a way And  cause why that hit brente

hit was a sygne of lechery that was that tyme muche vsed but Þat

hete myght nat a byde hys pure virginite And so thys was ta//

kyn In the contrey for a miracle and so euer afftir was hit called

Galahaddis welle So by aventure he com vnto the contrey of Gore

and Into the abbey where Sir Launcelot had bene to fore honde

and founde the tombe of kynge Bagdemagus But he was sown//

der Þer off For there was the tombe of Joseph· of Aramathy ys son

and the tombe of Symyan where Sir Launcelot had fayled

Than he loked in to a croufte vndir the mynstir and there he sawe a

tombe whichich full mervaylously Than asked he the brethirne

what hit was Sir seyde they a mervalous aventure that may

nat be brought to an ende but by hym that passith of bounte and

of knyghthode all them of the rounde table // I wolde seyde Sir

Galahad that ye wolde brynge me Þer to gladly seyde they and so

ledde hym tyll a cave and so he wente downe vppon grecis and

cam vnto the tombe and so the flamyng fayled & Þe fyre staun//

ched which many a day had bene grete // Than cam Þer a voice


f. 404v (XVII.18-19)

 

whych seyde much ar ye be holde to thanke god which hath gyven you a good

owre that ye may draw oute the soulis of erthely payne and to putte

them in to the Joyes of paradyse // Sir I am of youre kynred which hath

dwelled in thys hete thys iij· C· wyntir and liiijt· to be purged of the

synne that I ded a yenste Aramathy Joseph· Than sir Galahad

toke the body in his armys and bare hit in to the mynster And that

nyght lay Sir Galahad in the abbay And on the morne he gaff

hym hys seruyse and put hym in the erthe by fore the hyȝe awter

So departed he frome Þens and commended the brethirn to god and so he

rode v· dayes tylle that he cam to the maymed kynge And euer so

lowed Sir Percivale the v· dayes where he had bene And so one tolde

hym how the aventures of Logrus were encheved So on a day

hit be felle that he cam oute of a grete foreyste and Þer mette they

at travers with Sir Bors which rode a lone // Hit ys no rede to

aske if they were glad and so he salewed Þem and they yelded

to hym honoure and good aventure and euerych tolde oÞer how Þey

had spedde Than seyde Sir Bors hit ys more than a yere & a halff

that I no lay x tymes where men dwelled but in wylde forestis

and in mownteaynes but was euer my comforte // Than rode they

a grete whyle tylle they cam to the castell of Carbonek and

whan they were entirde with In kynge pelles knew hyem So

there was grete Joy fore he wyste well by her commynge Þat they

had fulfylled the Sankgreall Than Elyaȝar kynge pelles sonne

brought to fore them the brokyn swerde where with Josephe

was stryken thorow the thyghe Than Sir Bors sette his honde

Þer to to say if he myght haue sowded hit a gayne but hit wolde

nat be Than he toke hit to Sir Percivale but he had no more

power Þer to than he Now haue ye hit a gayne seyde sir Percivale

vnto Sir Galahad for and hit be euer encheved by ony bodily

man ye muste do hit and than he toke the pecis and set hem

 

 

 

                                                to gydirs


f. 405 (XVII.19)

 

to gydirs and semed to them as hit had neuer be brokyn & as well

as hit was firste forged And whan they with In aspyed that

the aventures of the swerde was encheved Than they gaff Þe

swerde to Sir Bors for hit myght no bettir be sette for he was

so good a knyght and a worthy man And a litill be fore evyn

the swerde a rose grete and merevaylous and was full of grete

hete that many men felle for drede And anone alyȝte a voyce

that seyde amonge them and seyde they that ouȝt nat to sitte

at the table of oure lorde Jhu cryste avoyde hens For now Þer

shall verry knyghtes be fedde So they wente Þense all sauf kyng

Pelles and Elyaȝar hys sonne which were holy men and a mayde

whych was hys nyce And so thes iij· knyght and Þes iij· elles were

no mo // And anone they saw knyghtes all armed Þat cam In at

the halle dore and ded of Þer helmys and armys and seyde vnto

Sir Galahad for we haue hyȝed ryght muche for to be with you

at thys table where the holy mete shall be departed // Than seyde he ye

be well com but of whens be ye // So iij· of them seyde they were of

Gaule and oÞer iij· seyde they were of Irelonde and oÞer iij· seyde they were

of Danemarke // And so as they sate Þus there cam oute a bedde of

tre of a chambir which iiij· Jantill women brouȝte and in the bedde

lay a good man syke and had a crowne of golde vppon his hede and

there In the myddis of the paleyse they sette hym downe and wente

A gayne Than he lyffte vp hys hede and seyde Sir Galahad good

knyght ye be ryght well com for much haue y desyred your commyng

for in such · payne and In such angwysh as I haue suffird longe

but now I truste to god the terme ys com that my payne shall be

a layed and sone passe oute of thys worlde so as hit was promysed

me longe a go And there with a voice seyde Þer be ij· amonge you

that be nat in the queste of the Sankgreall and Þer fore departith


f. 405v (XVII.19-20)

 

Than kynge Pelles and hys sunne departed and Þer with all be semed Þem

that Þer cam an olde man and iiij· angelis frome hevyn clothed in

lyknesse of a byshop and had a crosse in hys honde and Þes iiij·

angels bare hym vp in a chayre and sette hym downe be fore the

table of syluer // where vppon the Sankgreall was and hit semed

that he that he had in myddis of hys forehede lettirs which seyde

So you here Joseph the firste bysshop of crystendom Þe same which

oure lorde succoured in the cite of Sarras in the spirituall pal·

lesy Than the knyghtes mervayled for that bysshop was dede more

than iij·C· yere to fore a knyghtes seyde he mervayle nat for I

was som tyme an erthely man So with that they harde Þe cham/

bir dore opyn and there they saw angels and ij· bare candils of

wexe and the thirde bare a towell and the iiij· a speare which bled

mervaylously that the droppis felle with In a boxe which he hylde with

hys othir hande and anone they sette the candylys vppon Þe table

and the thirde the towell vppon the vessell and the iiij· Þe holy

speare evyn vp ryght vppon the vessell And Þan the bysshop

made sembelaunte as Þouȝe he wolde haue gone to Þe sakeryng

of a masse and than he toke an obley which was made in lyk

nesse of brede and at the lyfftyng vp there cam a vigoure in

lyknesse of a chylde And the vysayge was as rede and as bryȝt

os ony fyre and smote hym selff in to the brede that all Þey saw

hit that the brede was fourmed of a fleyshely man and Þan he

put hit in to the holy vessell a gayne and Þan he ded than longed

to a preste to do masse And than he wente to Sir Galahad and

kyssed hym and bade hym go and kysse hys felowis And so he

ded anone Now seyde he the seruauntes of Jhu cryste ye shull be

fedde a fore thys table with swete metis that neuer knyghtes yet

tasted And whan he had seyde he vanysshed a way and Þey sette


f. 406 (XVII.20)

 

hem at the table in grete drede and made Þer prayers Than loked

they and saw a man com oute of the holy vessell that had all

the sygnes of the passion of Jhu cryste bledynge all opynly and

seyde my knyghtes and my seruauntes And my trew chyldren which

bene com oute of dedly lyff in to the spirituall lyff I woll no

lenger couer me frome you but ye shall se now a parte of my secretes

and of my hydde thynges // Now holdith and resseyvith Þe hyȝe order

and mete whych ye haue so much· desired // Than toke he hym

selff the holy vessell and cam to sir Galahad and he kneled a

downe and resseyved hys saveoure And aftir hym so ressayved

all hys felowis and they thouȝt hit so sweete that hit was mer//

vaylous to telle Than seyde he to Sir Galahad sonne wotyst Þou

what I holde be twyxte my hondis Nay seyde he but if ye telle

me // Thys ys seyde he the holy dysshe where In I ete the lambe

on estir day and now hast Þou sene Þat Þou moste desired to se

but yet hast Þou nat sene hit so opynly as Þou shalt se hit in

the cite of Sarras in the spirituall paleyse There fore Þis nyȝt hit

shall departe frome the Realme of Logrus and hit shall neuer

more be sone here And knowyst Þou where fore for he ys nat ser//

ued noÞer worshipped to hys ryght by hem of thys londe for Þey

be turned to evyll lyvyng and there fore I shall disherite Þem

of the honoure whych I haue done them And Þer fore go ye iij

vnto the see where ye shall fynde youre shippe redy And with you

take the swerde with the stronge gurdisls and no mo with you off

thys bloode of thys speare for to anoynte the maymed kynge

both his legges and hys body and he shall haue hys heale

Sir seyde Galahad why shall nat thys oÞer felowis go with vs

for thys cause for ryght as I departe my postels one here and a


f. 406v (XVII.20-1)

 

nothir there So I woll that ye departe and ij of you shall dy in my

seruyse and one of you shall com a gayne and telle tydynges Than

gaff he Than gaff he hem hys blyssynge and vanysshed a

way And Sir Galahad wente anone to the speare which·

lay vpponte the table and towched the bloode with hys fyngirs

and cam aftir to the maymed knyght and anoynted his legges

and hys body and there with he clothed hym anone and sterte

vppon hys feete oute of hys bedde as an hole man & thanked

god that he had heled hym and anone he leffte the worlde and

yelded hym selffe to a place of religion of whyght monkes and

was a full holy man And that same nyght a boute mydnyȝt

cam a voyce a monge them which seyde my sunnes and nat

my chyeff sunnes my frendis and nat myne enemyes go ye

hens where ye hope beste to do And as I bade you do // A Þanked

be Þou lorde that Þou wolt whyght sauff to calle vs Þy sunnes

Now may well preve that we haue nat oure paynes And a

none in all haste they toke Þer harneyse and departed But Þe iij

kynges of Gaule one of hem hyght Claudyne kynge Claudas

sonne and the oÞer ij were grete Jantill women Than prayde

Sir Galahad to euery of them that and they com to kynge

Arthurs courte to salew my lorde Sir Launcelot my fadir

and hem all of the rounde table if they com on that party nat to

for gete hit Ryght so departed Sir Galahad and Sir Percivale

and Sir Bors with hym and so they rode iij· dayes and than

they com to a ryvage and founde the shippe where of the tale

spekith of to fore and whan they com to the bourde they founde

in the myddys of the table of syluer whych they had lefft with the

maymed kynge and the s Sankgreall whych was couerde with

rede Samyte Than were they glad to haue such thyngis in


f. 407 (XVII.21)

 

Þer felyship and so they entred and made grete reuerence Þer to And

Sir Galahad felle on hys kneys and prayde longe tyme to oure

lorde that at what tyme that he asked he myȝt passe oute of Þis

worlde And so longe he prayde tyll a voice seyde sir Galahad Þou shalt

haue thy requeste // And whan Þou askyst the deth of thy body Þou

shalt haue hit and Þan shalt Þou haue thy lyff of thy soule Than

Sir Percivale harde hym a litill and prayde hym of felyship that

was be twene them where fore he asked such thynges // Sir Þat shall

I telle you seyde sir Galahad Thys othir day whan we sawe a

parte of the aduentures of the Sangreall I was in such Joy of herte

that I trow neuer man was erthely And there fore I wote well whan

my body ys dede my soule shall be in grete Joy to se the blyssed

trinite euery day and the maieste of oure lorde Jhu cryste And so

longe were they in the shippe that they seyde to Sir Galahad sir

in thys bedde ye ouȝte to lyȝe for so seyth the lettirs And so he layde

hym downe and slelpte a grete whyle And whan he a waked

he loked to fore hym and saw the cite of Sarras and as they

wolde haue londed they saw the shyp where In Sir Percivall had

putte hys syster In · Truly seyde Sir Percivall in the name of god

well hath my syster holden vs covenaunte Than toke Þey oute

of the shyppe the table of syluer and he toke hit to sir Percivale & to

sir Bors to go to fore And Sir Galahad com be hynde and ryȝt

so they wente in to the cite And at the gate of the cite they saw·

an olde man croked And anone Sir Galahad called hym and

bade hym helpe to bere thys hevy thynge Truly seyde Þe olde

man hit ys x yere a go that I myght nat go but with crucchis

Care Þou nat seyde Sir Galahad a ryse vp and shew Þy good

wyll And so he assayde and founde hym selff as hole as euer

he was Than ran he to the table and toke one parte a yenst sir


f. 407v (XVII.21-2)

 

Galahad Anone rose Þer a grete noyse in the cite that a crypple was

made hole by knyghtes merveylous that entird in to the cite // Than

anone aftir the iij knyghtes wente to the watir and brouȝt vp in to

the paleyse Sir Percivallis syster and buryed her as rychely as

Þem ouȝte a kynges douȝter And whan the kynge of that contrey

knew that and saw that felyship whos name was Estorause he

sa asked them of whens they were and what thynge hit was

that they had brouȝt vppon the table of syluer and they told hym

the trouth· of the Sankgreall And the power whych god hath

sette there Than thys kynge was a grete tirraunte and was

com of the lyne of paynymes and toke hem and put hem in

preson in a depe hole But as sone as they were there our lord

sente them the Sankgreall thorow whos grace they were

all wey fullfylled whyle they were in preson // So at Þe yerys

ende hit be felle that thys kynge lay syke and felte Þat he sholde

dye / Than he sente for the iij· knyghtes and they cam a fore hym

And he cryed hem mercy of that he had done to them And Þey

for gave hym goodly and he dyed anone whan the kynge was

dede all the cite stoode dysse mayde and wyst nat who myght be her

kynge Ryght so as they were in counceyle Þer com a voice downe

amonge them and bade hem chose the yongyst knyght of iij

to be her kynge for he shall well maynteyne you and all youris

So they made Sir Galahad kynge by all the assente of Þe hole cite

and ellys they wolde haue slayne hym And whan he was

com to hys a boven he lete make a bovyn the table of syluer A

cheste of golde and of precious stonys that couerde the holy ves//

sell and euery day erly thes iij· knyghtes wolde com be fore

hit And make Þer prayers now at the yerys ende And Þer selff

Sonday aftir that Sir Galahad had borne the crowne of golde


f. 408 (XVII.22)

 

he arose vp erly and hys felowis and cam to the paleyse and

saw to fore hem the holy vessell And aman knelyng on his kne//

ys in lyknesse of a bysshop that had a boute hym a grete feliship

of angels as hit had bene Jhu cryste hym selff And Þan he

a rose and be gan a masse of oure lady And so he cam to Þe sake//

rynge And anone made an ende // he called Sir Galahad vnto

hym and seyde com forthe the seruaunte of Jhu cryste and Þou shalt

se Þat Þou hast much desired to se and Þan he be gan to tremble

ryght harde whan the dedly fleysh be gan to be holde Þe spiri

tuall thynges than he hylde vp his hondis towarde hevyn

and seyde lorde I thanke the for now I se that that hath be my

desire many a day Now my blyssed lorde I wold nat lyve in Þis

wrecched worlde no lenger if hit myght please the lorde And

Þer with the good man toke oure lordes body be twyxte hys hondis

and pfird hit to Sir Galahad and he resseyved hit ryght gladly

and mekely // Nowotist Þou what I am seyde the good man Nay Sir

seyde sir Galahad I am Joseph the sonne of Joseph of Aramathy

which oure lorde hath sente to Þe to bere the felyship And wotyst

Þou where fore he hathe sente me more than ony oÞer for Þou hast

resembled in to thynges that Þou hast sene that ys the mervayles

of the Sankgreall for Þou hast bene a clene mayde as I haue be

and and And whan he had seyde thes wordis he wente to Sir

Percivale and kyssed hym and commended hym to god

and seyde my fayre lorde salew me vnto my lorde sir Launcelot

my fadir and as sone as ye se hym bydde hym remembir of Þis

worlde vnstable and there with he kneled downe to fore the

table and made hys prayers and so suddeynly departed hys

soule to Jhu cryste and a grete multitude of angels bare hit


f. 408v (XVII.22-3)

 

vp to hevyn evyn in the syght of his ij felowis Also thes ij knyghtes saw

com frome hevyn and hande but they sy nat the body And so hit cam

ryght to the vessell and toke hit and the speare and so bare hit vp in

to hevyn and sythen was Þer neuer man so hardy to sey that he hade seyd

the Sankgreal So whan Sir Percivale & Sir Bors saw Sir Ga//

lahad dede they made as much sorow as euer ded men And if they

had nat bene good men they myght lyghtly hav a falle in dispayre

And so poople of the contrey and cite they were ryght hevy but

so he was buryed and as sone as he was buryed Sir Percivale

yelded hym to an Ermytayge oute of the cite and toke religious cloÞyng

And Sir Bors was all wey with hym but he chonged neuer hys

seculer clothyng for that he purposed hym to go a gayne in to Þe real/

me of logrus Thus a yere and ij monethis lyved sir Percivale in

the ermytayge a full holy lyff and Þan passed oute of Þe worlde

Than Sir Bors lat bury hym by hys syster and by sir Galahad in Þe

spiritualites // So whan Sir Bors saw that he was in so Farre

contreyes as in the partis of Babilonye he departed frome Þe cite of

Sarras and armed hym and cam to the see and entird in to a

shippe And so hit befelle hym by good aduenture he cam vnto

the realme of Logrus and so he rode a pace tylle he com to Ca//

melot where the kynge was and Þan was Þer made grete Joy of

of hym in all the courte for they wente he had bene loste for as

much as he had bene so longe oute of the contrey And whan

they had etyn the kynge made grete clerkes to com be fore hym

for cause they shulde cronycle of the hyȝe aduentures of the

good knyghtes // So whan Sir Bors had tolde hym of the hyȝe

aventures of the Sankgreall such· as had be falle hym and his

iij· felowes which were Sir Launcelot Percivale and sir Galahad

and hym selff Than Sir Launcelot tolde the aduentures of the

Sangreall that he had sene And all thys was made in grete bookes


f. 409 (XVII.23)

 

and put vp in almeryes at Salysbury // And anone Sir Bors seyde

to Sir Launcelot Sir Galahad youre owne sonne salewed you by

me and aftir you my lorde kynge Arthure and all the hole courte

And so ded Sir Percivale for I buryed Þem both myne owne hondis

in the cite of Sarras Also Sir Launcelot Sir Galahad prayde

Þou to remembir of thys vnsyker worlde as ye be hyȝt hym whan

ye were to gydirs more Þan halffe a yere // Thys ys trew seyde sir Launclot

Now I truste to god hys prayer shall a vayle me Than sir Launcelot

toke Sir Bors in hys armys and seyde Cousyn ye ar ryȝt well com

to me for ye and I shall neuer departe in sundir whylis oure lyvys

may laste Sir seyde he as ye woll So woll I · Thus endith Þe tale

of the s Sankgreal· that was breffly drawy oute of freynshe

which ys a tale cronycled for one of the trewyst and of Þe holyest

that ys in thys worlde By Sir Thomas Maleorre knyght·

O blessed ihu helpe hym thorow hys myght ·  Amen·


 


 

 

¶ Capitulum xiiij /

NOw wylle I departe sayd Galahad / for I haue moche on hand / for many good knyghtes be ful besy aboute hit / And this knyghte and I were in the same quest of the Sancgreal / Sire said a good man / for his synne he was thus wounded / and I merueylle said the good man how ye durst take vpon yow soo ryche a thynge as the hyghe ordre of knyghthode withoute clene confession / & that was the cause ye were bytterly wounded / For the way on the ryȝt hand betokeneth the hyghe way of our lord Ihesu Cryste / and the way of a good true good lyuer / And the other wey betokeneth the way of synners and of mysbyleuers / And whanne the deuylle sawe your pryde and presumpcyon for to take yow in the quest of the Sancgreal / that made you to be ouerthrowen for hit may not be encheued but by vertuous lyuynge / Also the wrytynge on the crosse was a sygnyfycacyon of heuenly dedes and of knyghtly dedes in goddes werkes and no knyȝtly dedes in worldly werkes / and pryde is hede of alle dedely synnes that caused this knyghte to departe from Galahad / & where thow tokest the croune of gold / thow synnest in couetyse and in thefte / Alle this were no knyghtely dedes / And this Galahad the holy knyghte / the whiche foughte with the two knyghtes / the two knyghtes sygnefyen the two dedely synnes whiche were holy in this knyghte Melyas / and they myghte not withstande yow / for ye are withoute dedely synne / Now departed Galahad from thens and betaught hem alle vnto god Sir Melyas sayd my lord Galahad as soone as I may ryde I shalle seke yow / god send yow helthe said Galahad / & soo toke his hors and departed / and rode many Iourneyes forward and backward as aduenture wold lede hym /

¶ And at the laste hit happend hym to departe from a place or a Castel the whiche was named Abblasoure / and he hadde herd no masse / the whiche he was wonte euer to here or euer he departed oute of ony Castel or place / and kepte that for a customme /

¶ Thenne syr Galahad came vnto a montayne Page  632 [leaf 316v] where he fond an old chappel / and fond there no body for all alle was desolate / and there he kneled to fore the aulter / and besought god of holsome counceil / Soo as he prayd / he herd a voys that sayd / Goo thow now thou aduenturous knyghte to the Castel of maydens / and there doo thow awey thy wycked custommes

¶ Capitulum xv

WHanne syr Galahad herd this / he thanked god / & toke his hors / and he had not ryden but half a myle / he sawe in a valeye afore hym a stronge Castel with depe dyches / and there ranne besyde hit a fayr ryuer that hyghte Syuarne / and there he mette with a man of grete age / and eyther salewed other / and Galahad asked hym the Castels name / Fair syr said he hit is the Castel of maydens / That is a cursyd Castel said Galahalt / and alle they that ben conuersaunt therin / for alle pyte is oute therof and alle hardynesse and meschyef is therin / therfor I counceyle yow sir knyght to torne ageyne / Sir said Galahad wete yow wel I shalle not tourne ageyne / Thenne loked syre Galahad on his armes that noo thynge fayled hym / and thenne he put his sheld afore hym / & anone there mette hym seuen fayr maydens / the whiche sayd vnto hym / syr knyghte ye ryde here in a grete foly / for ye haue the water to passe ouer / why shold I not passe the water said galahad / So rode he awey from them / and mette with a Squyer that said knyghte / tho knyghtes in the Castel defyen yow / & defenden yow / ye go no ferther tyl that they wete what ye wolde / Faire sir saide Galahad I come for to destroye the wycked custome of this Castel / Sir and ye wille abyde by that ye shal haue ynough to doo / go yow now said Galahad and hast my nedes / Thenne the squyer entryd in to the castel / And anone after there came oute of the Castel seuen knyghtes and all were bretheren / And whan they sawe Galahad / they cryed knyghte kepe the for we assure the no thynge but dethe / why sayd galahad will ye alle haue adoo with me at ones / ye sayde they therto maist thow trust / Thenne Galahad putte forth his spere and smote the formest to the erthe that nere he brake his neck Page  633 [leaf 317r] And there with alle the other smote hym on his shelde grete strokes so that their speres brake

¶ Thenne syr Galahad drewe oute his swerd / and set vpon hem soo hard that it was merueylle to see hit / and soo thurgh grete force he made hem to forsake the felde / and Galahad chased hem tyl they entryd in to the Castel / and so passed thurȝ the Castel at another gate / And there mette syr Galahad an old man clothed in Relygyous clothynge and sayd / sire haue here the kayes of this Castel / Thenne syr Galahad opened the gates / and sawe soo moche peple in the stretes that he myghte not nombre them / and alle sayd syr ye be welcome / for longe haue we abyden here our delyueraunce / Thenne came to hym a gentylwoman and sayde these knyghtes be fledde / but they wille come ageyne this nyghte / and here to begynne ageyn their euylle customme

¶ What wille ye that I shalle doo sayd Galahad / Sir said the gentilwoman that ye send after alle the knyghtes hyder that hold their landes of this Castel / and make hem to swere for to vse the custommes that were vsed here to fore of olde tyme / I wille wel said Galahad / and there she broughte hym an horne of Iuory boūden with gold rychely / & saide sir blowe this horne whych wille be herde two myle aboute this Castel/

¶ Whanne syr Galahad had blowen the horne / he set hym doune vpon a bedde / Thenne came a preest to Galahad / and said syr hit is past a seuen yere agone that these seuen bretheren cam in to this Castel and herberowed with the lord of this castell that hyght the Duke Lyanowre / and he was lord of alle thys countrey / And whanne they aspyed the dukes doughter / that was a ful faire woman / Thenne by their fals couyn they made debate betwixe them self / and the duke of his goodenes wold haue departed hem / and there they slewe hym and his eldest sone / And thenne they took the mayden and the tresour of the castel / And thenne by grete force they helde alle the knyghtes of this Castel ageynste theire wylle vnder theyre obeyssaunce and in grete seruage and truage / robbynge and pyllynge the poure comyn peple of all that they had

¶ Soo hit happend on a daye the dukes doughter sayd ye haue done vnto me greete wronge to slee myn owne fader / and Page  634 [leaf 317v] my broder / and thus to holde our landes / not for thenne she sayd / ye shalle not holde this Castel for many yeres / for by one knyghte ye shal be ouercomen / Thus she prophecyed seuen yeres agone / wel said the seuen knyghtes / sythen ye say so / ther shal neuer lady nor knyghte passe this Castel / but they shall abyde maulgre their hedes / or dye therfor / tyl that knyghte be come/ by whome we shalle lese this Castel / And therfore is it called the maydens Castel / for they haue deuoured many maydens / Now said Galahad is she here for whome this Castel was lost Nay sir said the preest she was dede within these thre nyghtes after that she was thus enforced / and sythen haue they kepte their yonger syster which endureth grete paynes with mo other ladyes / By this were the knyghtes of the countray comen / & thenne he made hem doo homage and feaute to the kynges douȝter / and sette hem in grete ease of herte / And in the morne ther came one to Galahad and told hym how that Gawayn / gareth and Vwayne had slayne the seuen bretheren / I suppose wel said syr Galahad and took his armour and his hors / & commaunded hem vnto god /

¶ Capitulum xvj

NOw saith the tale after syr Gawayne departed / he rode many Iourneyes bothe toward and froward / And att the laste he cam to the Abbaye where syre Galahad had the whyte sheld / and there syr Gawayne lerned the way to sewe after syr Galahad / and soo he rode to the Abbay where Melyas lay seke / and there syr Melyas told syr Gawayn of the merueyllous aduentures that syr Galahad dyd / Certes said sire Gawayne I am not happy / that I took not the way that he wente / for and I maye mete with hym / I wille not departe from hym lyghtely / for alle merueyllous aduentures sir Galahad encheueth / Sir said one of the monkes he wille not of your felauship / why said syr Gawayne / Sir said he / for ye be wycked and synful / and he is ful blessid /

¶ Ryght as they thus stode talkynge / there came in rydynge syr Gareth / And thenne they made Ioye eyther of other / And on the morne they herd masse / and soo departed / And by the Page  635 [leaf 318r] way they met with syr Vwayne les auoultres / and there syre Vwayne told syr Gawayne how he had mette with none aduenture sythe he departed from the Courte / Nor we / said sir gawayne / and eyther promysed other of tho thre knyghtes not to departe whyle they were in that quest but yf fortune caused it/ Soo they departed and rode by fortune tyl that they came by the Castel of maydens / and there the seuen bretheren aspyed the thre knyghtes / and said sythen we be flemyd by one knyghte from this Castel / we shalle destroye alle the knyghtes of kyng Arthurs that we maye ouercome for the loue of syr Galahad And there with the seuen knyghtes sette vpon the thre knyghtes / and by fortune syr Gawayne slewe one of the bretheren / and echone of his felawes slewe another and soo slewe the remenaunt / And thenne they took the wey vnder the Castel / & there they loste the way that sir Galahad rode / and there eueryche of hem departed from other / and sir Gawayne rode tylle he came to an hermytage / and there he fond the good man sayenge his euensonge of our lady / and there syr Gawayne asked herberowe for charyte / and the good man graunted hit hym gladly / Thenne the good man asked hym what he was / Syre he said I am a knyȝt of kynge Arthurs that am in the queste of the Sancgreal / and my name is syr Gawayne / Sire sayd the good man I wold wete how it standeth betwixe god and yow / Sir said sir Gawayne I wille with a good will shewe yow my lyf yf hit please yow / and there he tolde the heremyte/ how a monke of an Abbay called me wycked knyght / he myght wel saye hit said the heremyte / for whanne ye were fyrste made knyghte ye sholde haue taken yow to knyghtely dedes & vertuous lyuynge / and ye haue done the contrary / for ye haue lyued mescheuously many wynters / & sir Galahad is a mayd and synned neuer / and that is the cause he shalle encheue where he goth / that ye nor none suche shalle not atteyne nor none in your felauship / for ye haue vsed the moost vntruest lyf that euer I herd knyght lyue / For certes had ye not ben so wycked as ye ar / neuer had the seuen bretheren be slayne by yow and your two felawes / For syre Galahad hym self alone bete hem alle seuen the day to forne / but his lyuyng is suche he shal slee no man lyghtely / Also I may say yow the Castel of maidens Page  636 [leaf 318v] betokenen the good soules that were in pryson afore the Incarnacyon of Ihesu Cryste / And the seuen knyghtes betokenen the seuen dedely synnes that regned that tyme in the world / & I may lyken the good Galahad vnto the sone of the hyghe fader / that lyghte within a mayde and bought alle the soules oute of thralle / Soo dyd syre Galahad delyuer all the maydens oute of the woful Castel / Now sire Gawayne said the good man / thou must doo penaunce for thy synne / syre what penaunce shalle I do / suche as I wille gyue sayd the good man / Nay said syre Gawayne I may doo no penaunce / For we knyghtes aduenturous ofte suffren grete woo and payne Wel sayd the good man / and thenne he held his pees / And on the morne syre Gawayne departed from the heremyte / and betaught hym vnto god / And by aduentur he mette with syre Aglouale and syr Gryflet two knyghtes of the table round/ And they two rode four dayes withoute fyndynge of ony aduenture / and at the fyfthe day they departed / And eueryche helde as felle them by aduenture

¶ Here leueth the tale of syr Gawayne and his felawes / and speke we of syr Galahad /

¶ Capitulum xvij

SOo whanne syr Galahad was departed from the castel of maydens / he rode tyl he came to a waste forest / & there he mette with syre launcelot and syr Percyuale but they knewe hym not / for he was newe desguysed / Ryghte so syr launcelot his fader dressid his spere and brake it vpon syr Galahad / and Galahad smote hym so ageyne that he smote doune hors and man / And thenne he drewe his suerd / and dressid hym vnto syr Percyuale / and smote hym soo on the helme that it rofe to the coyfe of stele / and had not the swerd swarued / syr Percyuale had ben slayne / and with the stroke he felle oute of his sadel / This Iustes was done to fore the hermytage where a recluse dwelled / And when she sawe syr galahad ryde / she said god be with the best knyghte of the world A certes said she alle alowde that Launcelot and Percyuale myȝt here it / And yonder two knyghtes had knowen the as wel as I doo they wold not haue encoūtred with the / thenne Page  637 [leaf 319r] syr Galahad herd her say so he was adrad to be knowen ther with he smote his hors with his spores / and rode a grete paas toward them / Thenne perceyued they bothe that he was Galahad / and vp they gat on their horses / and rode faste after hym but in a whyle he was out of their syghte / And thēne they torned ageyne with heuy chere / lete vs spere some tydynges sayd Percyuale at yonder recluse / Do as ye lyst said syr launcelot Whanne syr Percyuale came to the recluse she knewe hym wel ynough and syr launcelot bothe / but syr launcelot rode ouerthwart and endlonge in a wylde forest and helde no pathe / but as wyld aduenture led hym / And at the last he came to a stony Crosse whiche departed two wayes in waste land / and by the Crosse was a stone that was of marbel but it was so derke that syr launcelot myghte not wete what it was / Thenne syre Launcelot loked by hym / and sawe an old chappel / & ther he wende to haue fond peple / and sir launcelot teyed his hors tyl a tree / and there he dyd of his sheld / and henge hit vpon a tree / And thenne wente to the chappel dore and fonde hit waste and broken / And within he fond a fayr aulter ful rychely arayed with clothe of clene sylke / and there stode a fayre clene candelstyk / whiche bare syxe grete candels / and the candelstyk was of syluer / And whanne syre launcelot sawe thys lyght / he had grete wylle for to entre in to the chappel / but he coude fynde no place where he myghte entre / thenne was he passynge heuy and desmayed / Thenne he retorned and cam to his hors and dyd of his sadel and brydel / and lete hym pasture / & vnlaced his helme / and vngyrd his swerd and laide hym doune to slepe vpon his shelde to fore the Crosse /

¶ Capitulum xviij

ANd soo he felle on slepe and half wakynge and slepyng he sawe come by hym two palfreyes alle fayr & whyte / the whiche bare a lytter / therin lyenge a seke knyghte / And whanne he was nyghe the crosse / he there abode stylle / Alle this syr launcelot sawe / and beheld for he slepte not veryly / and he herd hym saye / O swete lord whanne shal Page  638 [leaf 319v] this sorowe leue me / And whanne shalle the holy vessel come by me / where thurgh I shalle be blessid / For I haue endured thus longe / for lytyl trespace / a ful grete whyle complayned the knyght thus / and alweyes syr launcelot herd it / With that syr launcelot sawe the Candelstyk with the syxe tapers come before the Crosse / and he sawe no body that brought it /

¶ Also there came a table of syluer and the holy vessel of the Sancgreal whiche launcelot had sene afore tyme in kynge Pescheours hows / And there with the seke knyghte sette hym vp / & helde vp bothe his handes / and said Faire swete lord whiche is here within this holy vessel / take hede vnto me that I may be hole of this maladye / And ther with on his handes and on his knees he wente soo nyghe that he touched the holy vessel / and kyste hit / and anone he was hole / and thenne he sayd lord god I thanke the / for I am helyd of this sekenesse / So whanne the holy vessel had ben there a grete whyle hit wente vnto the Chappel with the chaundeler and the lyght / soo that launcelot wyst not where it was become for he was ouertaken with synen that he had no power to ryse ageyne the holy vessel / wherfor after that many men said of hym shame / but he took repentaunce after that / Thenne the seke knyght dressid hym vp / & kyssed the crosse / anone his squyer brought hym his armes/ and asked his lord how he dyd / Certes sayd he I thanke god ryghte wel thurgh the holy vessel I am helyd / But I haue merueil of this slepynge knyghte that had no power to awake whanne this holy vessel was brought hyder / I dare ryȝt wel saye / sayd the squyer that he dwelleth in some dedely synne wherof he was neuer confessid / By my feythe said the knyght what someuer he be / he is vnhappy / for as I deme he is of the felauship of the round table / the whiche is entryd in to the quest of the Sancgreal / Sire said the squyer here I haue brought yow alle your armes sauf your helme and your suerd / and therfor by myn assente now maye ye take this knyȝtes helme and his suerd and so he dyd / And whan he was clene armed / he took syr laūcelots hors / for he was better than his and soo departed they from the Crosse /

¶ Capitulum xix

Page  639 [leaf 320r]

THenne anone syr launcelot waked and sette hym vp and bethought hym what he had sene there / & whether it were dremes or not / Ryght so herd he a voys that said syr launcelot more harder than is the stone / and more bytter than is the wood / and more naked and barer than is the leef of the fygge tree / therfore goo thow from hens / and wythdrawe the from this hooly place / And whanne syre launcelot herd this / he was passynge heuy and wyst not what to do / & so departed sore wepynge / and cursed the tyme that he was borne For thenne he demed neuer to haue hadde worship more For tho wordes went to his herte tyl that he knewe wherfor he was called soo / Thenne syre Launcelot wente to the Crosse & fonde his helme / his swerd and his hors taken away / And thenne he called hym self a veray wretche and moost vnhappy of all knyghtes / and there he sayd my synne and my wyckednes haue brought me vnto grete dishonour / For whanne I soughte worldly aduentures for worldly desyres I euer encheued them and had the better in euery place / and neuer was I discomfyt in no quarel were it ryght or wronge / And now I take vpon me the aduentures of holy thynges / & now I see and vnderstande that myn old synne hyndereth me and shameth me / so that I had no power to stere nor speke whan the holy blood appiered afore me / So thus he sorowed til hit was day / & herd the fowles synge / thenne somwhat he was comforted / But whan syr Launcelot myst his hors and his harneis thenne he wyste wel god was displeasyd with hym / Thenne he departed from the crosse on foote in to a foreste / and soo by pryme he came to an hyghe hylle & fonde an hermytage and an Heremyte theryn whiche was goynge vnto masse / And thenne launcelot kneled doune / & cryed on oure lorde mercy for his wycked werkes / Soo whanne masse was done launcelot called hym and prayed hym for charite for to her his lyfe / with a good will sayd the good man / Sir sayd he be ye of Kyng Arthurs Courte and of the felauship of the round table / ye forsothe and my name is sir Launcelot du lake that hath ben ryght wel said of / and now my good fortune is chaunged / For I am the moost wretche of the world / The Heremyte behelde hym & hadde merueille how he was soo abasshed / Syre Page  640 [leaf 320v] said the heremyte ye oughte to thanke god more than ony knyght lyuynge / for he hath caused yow to haue more worldly worship than ony knyghte that now lyueth / And for your presumpcyon to take vpon you in dedely synne for to be in his presence where his flesshe and his blood was / that caused you ye myghte not see hit with worldly eyen / for he wille not appiere where suche synners ben / but yf hit be vnto theire grete hurte & vnto her grete shame / & there is no knyght lyuynge now / that ought to kenne god soo grete thanke as ye / for he hath yeuen yow beaute / semelynes / and grete strengthe aboue all other knyghtes / and therfor ye are the morr beholdyng vnto god than ony other man to loue hym and drede hym / for your strength and manhode wille lytel auaylle yow / and god be ageynste yow /

¶ Capitulum xx /

THenne sir launcelot wept with heuy chere / and sayd Now I knowe wel ye saye me sothe / Sire sayd the good man / hyde none old synne from me / Truly said syr Launcelot that were me ful lothe to discouere / For this xiiij yere I neuer discouerd one thynge that I haue vsed / and that maye I now wyte my shame and my disauentur / And thenne he told there that good man alle his lyf / And hou he had loued a quene vnmesurably and oute of mesure longe / & alle my grete dedes of armes that I haue done I dyd for the moost party for the quenes sake / And for her sake wold I doo batail were hit ryght or wronge / and neuer dyd I bataille alle only for goddes sake / but for to wynne worshyp and to cause me to be the better biloued / and lytel or noughte I thanked god of hit / Thenne syr launcelot sayd I praye yow / counceylle me / I wille counceyle yow said the heremyte / yf ye wille ensure me that ye will neuer come in that quenes felauship as moche as ye may forbere / And thenne syre launcelot promysed hym he nold by the feithe of his body / loke that your herte and your mouthe accorde said the good man / and I shalle ensure yow ye shalle haue more worship than euer ye had / Holy fader said syre launcelot I merueylle of the voys Page  641 [leaf 321r] that sayd to me merueillous wordes as ye haue herd to fore hand / haue ye no merueylle sayd the good man therof / for hit semeth wel god loueth yow / for men maye vnderstande a stone is hard of kynde / and namely one more than another / and that is to vnderstande by the syr launcelot / for thou wylt not leue thy synne for no goodnes that god hath sente the / therfor thou arte more than ony stone / and neuer woldest thow be maade neysshe nor by water nor by fyre / And that is the hete of the holy ghoost maye not entre in the / Now take hede in alle the world men shal not fynde one knyghte to whome oure Lord hath yeuen soo moche of grace as he hath yeuen yow / for he hath yeuen yow fayrenes with semelynes / he hath yeuen the wyt discrecyon to knowe good from euyll / he hath yeuen the prowesse and hardynesse and gyuen the to werke soo largely / that thou hast had at al dayes the better where someuer thow came / and now our lord wille suffre the no lenger / but that thow shalte knowe hym whether thow wilt or nylt / And why the voyce called the bytter than wood / for where ouer moche synne duelleth / there may be but lytel swetnesse / wherfor thow arte lykened to an old roten tree / Now haue I shewed the why thou arte harder than the stone & bytterer than the tree / Now shall I shewe the why thow arte more naked and barer than the fygge tree / It befelle that our lord on palmsondaye preched in Iherusalem / and there he fonde in the people that alle hardnes was herberowed in them / and there he fond in alle the towne not one that wold herberowe hym / And thenne he wente withoute the Towne / and fond in myddes of the way a fygge tree the whiche was ryghte fayr and wel garnysshed of leues / but fruyte had it none / Thenne our lord cursyd the tree that bere no fruyte that betokeneth the fygge tree vnto Iherusalem that had leues and no fruyte / Soo thow syr launcelot whan the hooly Grayle was broughte afore the / he fonde in the noo fruyte / nor good thoughte nor good wille and defowled with lechery / Certes said sir launcelot alle that ye haue said is true / And from hens forward I caste me by the grace of god neuer to be so wycked as I haue ben / but as to folowe knyghthode and to do fetys of armes / Thenne the good man Ioyned syr launcelot suche penaunce as he myghte doo and to sewe knyghthode / and Page  642 [leaf 321v] so assoylled hym / and praid syre launcelot to abyde with hym alle that daye / I wylle wel said syr launcelot / for I haue neyther helme ne hors ne suerd / As for that sayd the good man I shalle helpe yow or to morne at euen of an hors and al that longed vnto yow / And thenne syr laūcelot repented hym gretely /

¶ here leueth of the history of syr launcelot /

¶ And here foloweth of syr Percyual de galys whiches the xiiij book

Book Fourteen: syr Percyual de galys

¶ Capitulum primum

NOw sayth the tale that whan syr launcelot was ryden after syre Galahad / the whiche had alle these aduentures aboue sayd / Sir Percyual torned ageyne vnto the recluse / where he demed to haue tydynges of that knyȝt that Launcelot folowed / And soo he kneled at her wyndow / and the recluse opened hit / and asked syre Percyuale what he wold / Madame he sayd I am a knyghte of kynge Arthurs Courte / and my name is syr Percyual de Galys / whanne the reecluse herd his name she had grete Ioye of hym / for mykel she had loued hym to forne ony other knyȝt / for she ouȝ to do so / for she was his aunt / And thenne she commaunded the gates to be opened and there he had alle the chere that she myght make hym and alle that was in her power was at his commaundement / Soo on the morne syr Percyual wente to the recluse / and asked her yf she knewe that knyghte with the whyte shelde / Sir said she why wold ye wete / Truly madame said syr Percyual I shalle neuer be wel at ease tyl that I knowe of that knyghtes felauship / and that I may fyghte with hym / for I maye not leue hym soo lyghtely / for I haue the shame yet / A Percyual sayd she wold ye fyghte with hym / I see wel ye haue grete wylle to be slayne as your fader was thorugh oultrageousnes / Madame sayd syr Percyual hit semeth by your wordes that ye knowe me / ye sayd she / I wel ought to knowe you for I am your aunt / al though I be in a pryory place / For Page  643 [leaf 322r] somme called me somtyme the quene of the waste landes / and I was called the quene of moost rychesse in the world / and it pleasyd me neuer my rychesse soo moche as doth my pouerte Thenne syre Percyual wepte for veray pyte whan that he knewe it was his aunt

¶ A fair neuewe said she whanne herd ye tydynges of your moder / Truly sayd he I herd none of her / but I dreme of her moche in my slepe / And therfore I wote not whether she be dede or on lyue / Certes fayr neuew sayd she / your moder is dede / for after your departynge from her / she took suche a sorowe that anone after she was confessid she dyed / Now god haue mercy on her sowle sayd syr Percyual hit sore forthynketh me / but alle we must chaunge the lyf /

¶ Now fayre Aunt telle me what is the knyghte / I deme hit be he that bare the reed armes on whytsonday / wete yow well said she / that this is he / for other wyse oughte he not to doo / but to goo in reed armes / and that same knyghte hath no piere / for he worcheth alle by myracle / and he shalle neuer be ouercome of none erthely mans hand

¶ Capitulum ij

ALso Merlyn made the round table in tokenyng of roundenes of the world / for by the round table is the world sygnefyed by ryghte / For al the world crysten and hethen repayren vnto the round table / And whan they are chosen to be of the felauship of the roūd table / they thynke hem more blessid & more in worship than yf they had goten halfe the world / and ye haue sene that they haue loste her faders & her moders and alle her kynne and her wyues and her children for to be of your felauship / It is wel sene by yow / For syns ye departed fro your moder / ye wold neuer see her ye fond suche felauship at the roūd table / whan Merlyn had ordeyned the round table he said by them which shold be felawes of the round table / the trouth of the Sancgreal shold be wel knowen and men asked hym how men myghte knowe them that sholde best do and to encheue the Sancgreal / thenne he said ther shold be thre whyte bulles that shold encheue hit / and the two sholde be maydens / and the thyrd shold be chast / And that one of the thre shold passe his fader as moche as the lyon passeth the lybard bothe of strengthe and hardynes Page  644 [leaf 322v] They that herd Merlyn saye soo / sayd thus vnto Merlyn / Sythen ther shalle be suche a knyghte thow sholdest ordeyne by thy craftes a sege that no man shold sytte in hit / but he al only that shalle passe alle other knyghtes / Thenne Merlyn ansuerd that he wold doo soo / And thenne he made the sege perillous in the whiche Galahad satte in at his mete on whytsonday last past / Now madame sayd syr Percyual so moche haue I herd of yow that by my good wylle I wille neuer haue adoo with syr Galahad but by waye of kyndenes / and for goddes loue fayr aunte / can ye teche me some way where I maye fynde hym / for moche wold I loue the felauship of hym / Fair neuewe sayd she ye must ryde vnto a Castel / the whiche is called Goothe / where he hath a cosyn germayn / and ther may ye be lodged this nyghte / And as he techeth you / seweth after as faste as ye can / and yf he can telle yow noo tydynges of hym / ryde streyght vnto the Castel of Carbonek where the maymed kynge is there lyenge / for there shalle ye here true tydynges of hym

¶ Capitulum Tercium

THenne departed syr Percyuale from his aunte eyther makynge grete sorowe / And soo he rode tyl euensonge tyme / And thenne he herd a clok smyte / and thēne he was ware of an hows closed wel with walles and depe dyches / and there he knocked at the gate / and was lete in / and he alyght and was ledde vnto a chamber and soone he was vnarmed / And there he had ryght good chere alle that nyghte / and on the morne he herd his masse / and in the monastery he fonde a preest redy at the aulter / And on the ryght syde he sawe a pewe closyd with yron / and behynde the aulter he sawe a ryche bedde and a fayre as of clothe of sylke and golde / Thenne syr Percyual aspyed that therin was a man or a woman / for the vysage was couerd / thenne he left of his lokyng and herd his seruyse / And whan hit came to the sacrynge / he that lay within that Percloos dressid hym vp and vncouerd his heede / and thenne hym besemed a passynge old man / and he had a crowne of gold vpon his hede / & his sholders were naked & vnhylled Page  645 [leaf 323r] vnto his nauel / And thenne sir Percyual aspyed his body / was ful of grete woundes bothe on the sholders armes and vysage / And euer he held vp his handes ageynst oure lordes body / and cryed / Fair swete fader Ihesu Cryst forgete not me and soo he laye doune / but alwayes he was in his prayer & orysons / and hym semed to be of the age of thre honderd wynter / And whanne the masse was done the preest took oure lordes body / and bare hit to the seke kynge / And whanne he had vsed hit / he dyd of his crowne / and commaunded the crowne to be sette on the aulter / Thenne syr Percyual asked one of the bretheren / what he was / Sire sayd the good man ye haue herd moche of Ioseph of Armathye how he was sente by Ihesu Cryst in to this land for to teche and preche the holy cristen feythe / and therfor he suffred many persecucyons the whiche the enemyes of Cryst dyd vnto hym / and in the Cyte of Sarras he conuerted a kynge whos name was Euelake / And so this kynge came with Ioseph in to this land / and euer he was besy to be there as the Sancgreal was / and on a tyme he nyghed it soo nyghe that oure lord was displeasyd with hym / but euer he folowed hit more and more / tyl god stroke hym al most blynde / Thenne this kynge cryed mercy / and sayd / faire lord lete me neuer dye tyl the good knyghte of my blood of the ix degree be come that I may see hym openly that he shal encheue the Sancgreal that I may kysse hym

¶ Capitulum Quartum

WHanne the kynge thus had made his prayers he herd a voys that sayd herd ben thy prayers / for thow shalt not dye tyl he haue kyst the / And whanne that knyȝte shalle come the clerenes of your eyen shalle come ageyne / and thow shalt see openly / and thy woundes shalle be heled / & erst shalle they neuer close / and this befelle of kynge Euelake / & this same kynge hath lyued this thre honderd wynters thys holy lyf / and men saye the knyghte is in the Courte that shall hele hym / Sir sayd the good man I praye yow telle me what knyghte that ye be / and yf ye be of kyng Arthurs courte & of the table roūd / ye forsoth said he / & my name is sir percyual Page  646 [leaf 323v] de Galys / And whanne the good man vnderstood his name he made grete Ioye of hym / And thenne syr percyual departed and rode tyl the houre of none / and he mette in a valey about a twenty men of armes whiche bare in a bere a knyghte dedely slayne / And whanne they sawe syr percyuale they asked hym of whens he was / and he ansuerd of the Courte of kyng Arthur / thenne they cryed all at ones slee hym / Thenne syr percyual smote the fyrst to the erthe and his hors vpon hym / And thenne seuen of the knyghtes smote vpon his sheld al attones and the remenaunt slewe his hors soo that he felle to the erthe Soo had they slayne hym or taken hym had not the good knyȝte sir Galahad with þe reed armes come there by aduenture in to tho partyes / And whanne he sawe alle tho knyghtes vpon one knyghte / he cryed saue me that knyghtes lyf / And thenne he dressid hym toward the twenty men of armes as faste as his hors myght dryue with his spere in the reyste / & smote the formest hors and man to the erthe / And whanne his spere was broken / he sette his hand to his suerd and smote on the ryght hand and on the lyfte hand / that it was merueylle to see / and at euery stroke he smote one doune or put hym to a rebuke / soo that they wold fyghte no more but fled to a thyck forest / and syr Galahad folowed them / And whanne sir percyuale sawe hym chase hem soo / he made grete sorowe that hys hors was awey / And thenne he wyst wel it was syre Galahad / And then̄e he cryed alowde A fayre knyghte abyde and suffre me to doo thankynges vnto the / for moche haue ye done for me / But euer syr Galahad rode soo fast that atte laste he past oute of his syghte / And as fast as sir percyual myght he wente after hym on foote cryenge / And thenne he mette with a yoman rydynge vpon an hakney the whiche led in his hand a grete stede blacker than ony bere / A fayr frend sayd sir percyuale as euer as I maye doo for yow / and to be your true knyghte in the fyrst place ye wille requyre me that ye wille lene me that black stede that I myghte ouertake a knyghte the whiche rydeth afore me

¶ Syre knyghte sayd the yoman I praye yow hold me excused of that / for that I maye not doo / For wete ye wel the hors is suche a mans hors that and I lente hit yow or ony man Page  647 [leaf 324r] that he wold slee me / Allas sayd sir Percyual / I had neuer soo grete sorowe as I haue had for losynge of yonder knyghte Syr sayd the yoman I am ryghte heuy for yow / for a good hors wold byseme yow wel / but I dar not delyuer you this hors but yf ye wold take hym from me / that wille I not doo sayd syre Percyual / and soo they departed / and syre Percyual sette hym doune vnder a tree / and made sorowe oute of mesure / & as he was there ther cam came a knyght rydyng on the hors that the yoman lad / and he was clene armed /

¶ Capitulum Quintum /

ANd anone the yoman came pryckynge after as fast as euer he myghte / and asked syre Percyuale yf he sawe ony knyghte rydynge on his blak stede / ye sir for soth said he / why syr aske ye me that / A syre that stede he hath benome me with strength / wherfor my lord wylle slee me / in what place he fyndeth me / Wel saide syre Percyual what woldest thow that I dyd thou seest wel that I am on foote / but and I had a good hors / I shold brynge hym soone ageyne / Sir said the yoman take myn hakney and doo the best ye can / and I shall sewe yow on foote to wete how that ye shalle spede / Thenne sir Percyual alyghte vpon that hakney / and rode as faste as he myghte / And at the laste he sawe that knyghte / And thenne he cryed knyghte torne ageyne / and he torned / and set his spere ageynst syr Percyuale / and he smote the hakney in the myddes of the brest that he felle doune dede to the erthe / and there he had a grete falle / and the other rode his waye / And thenne syr Percyual was wood wrothe / and cryed abyde wycked knyghte coward and fals herted knyghte torne ageyne / and fyghte with me on foote / but he ansuerd not / but paste on hys waye / whanne syr Percyual sawe he wold not torne he caste aweye his helme and suerd / and sayd / now am I a veray wretche / cursyd / and moost vnhappy aboue all other knyghtes So in this sorowe he abode all that day tyl hit was nyghte / & thenne he was faynte & leyd hym doun and slepte tyl it was mydnyghte / & thenne he awaked & sawe afore hym a woman whiche sayd vnto hym ryght fyersly / Syre Percyuale what Page  648 [leaf 324v] dost thow here / he ansuerd I doo neyther good nor grete ylle / Yf thow wylt ensure me said she that thow wylt fulfylle my wylle / whanne I somone the I shall lene the myn owne hors whiche shalle bere the whyder thou wylt / Syr Percyual was glad of her profer and ensured her to fulfylle alle her desyre / thenne abydeth me here / and I shalle goo fetche yow an hors / And soo she cam soone ageyne and broughte an hors with her that was inly blak / whan Percyual beheld that hors / he merueylled that it was soo grete and soo wel apparaylled / and not for thenne he was soo hardy / & he lepte vpon hym / & took none hede of hym self / And soo anone as he was vpon hym / he threst to hym with his spores / and soo rode by a forest / and the mone shone clere / And within an houre and lasse he bare hym four dayes Iourney thens vntyl he came to a rough water the whiche roryd / and his hors wold haue borne hym in to hit

¶ Capitulum vj

ANd whanne syr Percyuale came nyghe the brymme / & sawe the water so boystous / he doubted to ouerpasse it And thenne he made a sygne of the crosse in his forheed / whan the fende felte hym soo charged / he shoke of syr Percyual / and he wente in to the water cryenge and roryng makyng grete sorowe / and it semed vnto hym that the water brente / Thenne sir Percyual perceyued it was a fend the which wold haue brought hym vnto his perdycyon / Thenne he commaunded hym self vnto god / and prayd oure lord to kepe hym from alle suche temptacyons / and so he praid alle that nyghte tyl on the morn that it was day / thenne he sawe that he was in a wylde montayne / the whiche was closed with the see nygh al aboute that he myȝt see no land about hym whiche myȝte releue hym but wylde beestes / and thenne he went in to a valey / and there he sawe a yonge serpent brynge a yonge lyon by the neck / and soo he came by sir Percyual / with that came a grete lyon cryenge and rorynge after the serpent

¶ And as fast as syr Percyual sawe thys / he merueylled / & hyhed hym thyder / but anon the lyon had ouertake the serpent Page  649 [leaf 325r] and beganne bataille with hym /

¶ And thenne syr Percyual thoughte to helpe the lyon for he was the more naturel beeste / of the two / and there with he drewe his suerd / and sette hys shelde afore hym / and ther he gaf the serpent suche a buffet that he had a dedely wound / whanne the lyon sawe that / he made no resemblaunt to fyghte with hym / but made hym all the chere that a beest myghte make a man / Thenne Percyuale perceyued that and caste doune his sheld / whiche was broken / and thenne he dyd of his helme for to gadre wynde / for he was gretely enchafed with the serpente / and the lyon wente alwaye aboute hym fawnynge as a spanyel / And thenne he stroked hym on the neck and on the sholders / And thenne he thanked god of the felauship of that beeste / And aboute none the lyon took his lytel whelp and trussed hym and bare hym there he came fro / Thenne was syr Percyual alone / And as the tale telleth be was one of the men of the world at that tyme / whiche moost byleued in oure lord Ihesu Cryste / for in tho dayes there were but fewe folkes that byleued in god parfytely / For in tho dayes the sone spared not the fader no more than a straunger / And soo syre Percyual comforted hymself in our lord Ihesu / and besoughte god no temptacyon shold brynge hym oute of goddes seruyse / but to endure as his true champyon / Thus whanne syr Percyual had prayd he sawe the lyon came toward hym / and thenne he couched doune at his feete / And soo alle that nyghte the lyon and he slepte to gyders / & whanne syr Percyual slepte / he dremed a merueyllous dreme that there two ladyes mette with hym / and that one sat vpon a lyon / and that other sat vpon a serpent / and that one of hem was yonge and the other was old / and the yongest hym thought said sir Percyual my lord saleweth the / and sendeth the word that thow araye the / and make the redy / for to morne thow must fyghte with the strongest champyon of the world / And yf thow be ouercome / thou shalt not be quyte for losyng of ony of thy membrys / but thow shalt be shamed for euer to the worldes ende / And thenne he asked her what was her lord And she said the grettest lord of alle the world / and soo she departed sodenly that he wyste not where Page  650 [leaf 325v]

¶ Capitulum vij

THenne came forth the other lady that rode vpon the serpent / and she sayd syr Percyual I complayne me of yow that ye haue done vnto me and haue not offended vnto yow / Certes madame he sayd / vnto yow nor no lady I neuer offended / yes sayd she / I shalle telle yow why / I have nourysshed in this place a grete whyle a serpent whiche serued me a grete whyle / and yesterday ye slewe hym as he gat his pray Saye me for what cause ye slewe hym / for the lyon was not yours / Madame said syre Percyuale I knowe wel the Lyon was not myn / but I dyd hit / for the lyon is of more gentiller nature than the serpent / and therfor I slewe hym / me semeth / I dyd not amys ageynst yow / Madame sayd he what wold ye that I dyd / I wold sayd she for the amendys of my beste that ye bycome my man / and thenne he ansuerd that wylle I not graunte yow / No sayd she truly ye were neuer but my seruaunt / syn ye receyued the homage of our lord Ihesu crist Therfor I ensure yow in what place I may fynde yow withoute kepynge I shalle take yow as he that somtyme was my man / And soo she departed from syr Percyual and lefte hym slepynge the whiche was sore trauaylled of his aduysyon / & on the morne he aroos and blessid hym and he was passynge feble / Thenne was sire Percyual ware in the see / and sawe a ship come sayllynge toward hym / and syr Percyual went vnto the shyp and fond hit couerd within and withoute wyth whyte Samyte / And at the bord stood an old man clothed in a surples in lykenes of a preest / Syr said syr Percyuale ye be welcome / god kepe yow sayd the good man / Sir sayd the old man of whens be ye / Syr said sir Percyual I am of kynge Arthurs Courte / and a knyghte of the table Round / the whiche am in the quest of the Sancgreal / and here I am in grete duresse and neuer lyke to escape oute of this wyldernesse Doubte not sayd the good man and ye be soo true a knyghte / as the ordre of chyualry requyreth / and of herte as ye oughte to be / ye shold not doubte that none enemy shold slay yow / What ar ye said syr Percyuale / syr sayd the old man I am of a straunge countrey / and hyther I come to comforte yow / Syr Page  651 [leaf 326r] sayd syr Percyuale what sygnefyeth my dreme that I dremed this nyghte / & there he told hym alle to gyder / She whiche rode vpon the lyon betokeneth the newe lawe of holy chirche that is to vnderstande / fayth / good hope / byleue / and baptym / for she semed yonger than the other / hit is grete reason / for she was borne in the resurection and the passion of our lord Ihesu cryste And for grete loue she came to the / to warne the of thy grete bataille that shalle befalle the / with whome sayd syre Percyuale shalle I fyghte / with the moost champyon of the world said the old man / for as the lady sayd / but yf thow quyte the wel thow shalt not be quyte by losynge of one membre / but thow shalt be shamed to the worldes ende / And she that rode on the serpent sygnefyeth the olde lawe / and that serpent betokeneth a fende / And why she blamed the that thow slewest her seruaunt it betokeneth no thyng / the serpent that thow slewest betokeneth the deuylle that thou rodest vp on to the roche / And whan thou madest a sygne of the Crosse / there thow slewest hym / & putte awey his power / And whanne she asked the amendys and to sbecome her man / And thou saydest thou woldest not / that was to make the to bileue on her and leue thy baptym / Soo he commaunded syr Percyuale to departe / and soo he lepte ouer the bord and the ship / and alle wente awey he wyste not whyder / Thenne he wente vp vnto the roche and fonde the lyon whyche alwey kepte hym felaushyp and he stryked hym vpon the bak and had grete Ioye of hym

¶ Capitulum viij

BY that syr Percyuale had abyden there tyl myddaye / he sawe a shyp came rowyng in the see as all the wynd of the world had dryuen hit / And soo it droof vnder that roche / And whanne syr Percyual sawe this / he hyhed hym thyder / and fonde the ship couerd with sylke more blacker than ony beare / and therin was gentilwoman of grete beaute / and she was clothed rychely that none myghte be better / And whanne she sawe syr Percyuale / she saide Who broughte yow in this wyldernes where ye be neuer lyke to passe hens / for ye shal dye here for hongre and meschyef / Damoysel saide Page  652 [leaf 325v] syr Percyuale I serue the best man of the world / and in his seruyse he wille not suffre me to dye / for who that knocketh shal entre / and who that asketh shalle haue / and who seketh hym / he hydeth hym not / But thenne she said syr Percyual wote ye what I am / ye sayd he / Now who taughte yow my name said she / Now sayd syre Percyuale I knowe you better than ye wene / And I came oute of the waste forest where I found the reed knyghte with the whyte sheld sayd the damoysel / A damoysel said he with that knyghte wold I mete passyng fayn Sir knyghte said she / and ye wille ensure me by the feyth that ye owe vnto knyghthode that ye shalle doo my wylle what tyme I somone yow / and I shalle brynge yow vnto that knyȝt ye said he / I shalle promyse yow to fulfylle your desyre / well said she now shal I telle yow / I sawe hym in the foreste chacynge two knyghtes vnto a water the whiche is called mortayse and they drofe hym in to the water for drede of dethe / and the two knyghtes passed ouer / and the reed knyghte passed after / and there his hors was drenched / and he thorou grete strengthe escaped vnto the land / thus she told hym / and syr Percyuale was passynge glad therof / Thenne she asked hym yf he had ete ony mete late / Nay madame truly I ete no mete nyghe this thre dayes / but late here I spak with a good man that fedde me with his good wordes and hooly / and refresshyd me gretely / A syr knyghte said she that same man is an enchaunter and a multyplyer of wordes / For and ye byleue hym ye shall playnly be shamed & dye in this roche for pure honger and be eten with wylde beestes and ye be a yong man and a goodly knyghte / and I shalle helpe yow & ye wil What are ye said syr Percyual that profered me thus grete kyndenes / I am said she a gentylwoman that am disheryted / whiche was somtyme the rychest woman of the world / Damoysel said syr Percyual who hath disheryted yow / for I haue grete pyte of yow / Sir said she I dwellid with the grettest man of the world and he made me so fayre and clere that ther was none lyke me / and of that grete beaute I had a lytil pryde more than I ought to haue had / Also I sayd a word that pleasyd hym not / And thenne he wold not suffre me to be ony lenger in his company / and soo drofe me from myn herytage / Page  653 [leaf 327r] and soo disheryted me / and he had neuer pyte of me nor of none of my counceylle / nor of my Courte / And sythen sir knyght hit hat befallen me soo / and thurgh me and myn I haue benome hym many of his men / and made hem to become my men For they aske neuer no thyng of me but I gyue hit hem that and moche more / Thus I and al my seruauntes were ayenst hym nyghte and daye / Therfore I knowe now no good knyȝt nor noo good man but I gete hym on my syde and I maye And for that I knowe that thow arte a good knyȝt / I byseche yow to helpe me / And for ye be a felawe of the round table wherfore ye oughte not to fayle noo gentylwoman whiche is disheryted / and she besought yow of helpe

¶ Capitulum ix

THenne syr Percyual promysed her alle the helpe that he myghte / And thenne she thanked hym / And at that tyme the wheder was hote / thenne she called vnto her a gentylwoman and badde her brynge forth a pauelione / And soo she dyd / and pyght hit vpon the grauel / Sire sayd she / Now maye ye reste yow in this hete of the day / Thenne he thanked her / and she put of his helme and his sheld / and there he slepte a grete whyle / And thenne he awoke / and asked her / yf she had ony mete / and she sayd ye / also ye shalle haue ynough / and soo there was sette ynough vpon the table / and theron soo moche þt he had merueil / for there was all maner of metes þt he coude thynke on / Also he dranke ther the strengest wyn that euer he dranke / hym thoughte / and there with he was a lytel chafed more than he oughte to be / with that he beheld the gentilwoman / and hym thought / she was the fayrest creature that euer he sawe / And thenne syre Percyual proferd her loue and prayd her that she wold be his / Thenne she refused hym in a maner whan he requyred her for the cause he shold be the more ardant on her / and euer he seased not to pray her of loue / And whanne she sawe hym wel enchauffed / thenne she sayd syr Percyuale wete yow wel I shall not fulfylle youre wylle / but yf ye swere from hensforth ye shalle be my true seruaunt / and to doo no thynge but that I shall commaunde Page  654 [leaf 327v] yow / wyl ye ensure me this as ye be a true knyghte / ye sayd he fayr lady by the feythe of my body / wel sayd she now shal ye doo with me what soo hit please yow / and now wete ye well / ye are the knyghte in the world that I haue moost desyre to / And thenne two squyers were commaunded to make a bed in myddes of the pauelione / And anone she was vnclothed & leyd therin / And thenne syre Percyual leyd hym doune by her naked / and by aduenture and grace he sawe his suerd lye on the ground naked / in whoos pomel was a reede crosse and the synge of the crucyfyxe therin / and bethoughte hym on his knyghthode and his promyse made to fore hand vnto the good man / thenne he made a synge of the crosse in his forhede / & there with the pauelione torned vp so doune / and thenne it chaunged vnto a smoke / and a blak clowde / and thenne he was adradde and cryed alowde /

¶ Capitulum x

FAyr swete fader Ihesu Cryste ne lete me not be shamed / the whiche was nyghte lost had not thy good grace ben / And thenne he loked in to a shyp / and sawe her entre therin / Whiche sayd sir Percyual ye haue bitrayed me / and soo she wente with the wynde rorynge and yellynge that it semed alle the water brent after her / Thenne syr percyual made grete sorowe / and drewe his suerd vnto hym / sayēg sythen my flessh will be my maister I shalle punysshe it / and there with he rofe hym self thurgh the that thygh the blood starte aboute hym / & said O good lord takek this in recompensacion of that I haue done ageynst the my lord / Soo thenne he clothed hym and armed hym / and called hym self a wretche / sayenge how nyghe was I lost / and to haue loste that I shold neuer haue geten ageyne / that was my vyrgynyte / for that maye neuer be recouerd after hit is ones lost / and thenne he stopped his bledyng wounde with a pyece of his sherte / Thus as he made his moue he saw the same shyp come fro Oryent that the good man was in the day afore / and the noble knyȝt was ashamed with hym selfe / & there with he felle in a swoune / And whan he awoke he went vnto hym wekely and there he salewed this good man / And Page  655 [leaf 328r] thenne he asked syr Percyual how hast thow done sythe I departed / Sir said he / here was a gentylwoman and ledde me in to dedely synne / And there he told hym all to gyders / Knewe ye not the mayde sayd the good man / Syr said he nay but wel I wote the fende sente her hyther to shame me / O good knyghte sayd he thow arte a foole / for that gentilwoman was the maister fende of helle / the whiche hath power aboue alle deuyls / and that was the old lady that thow sawest in thyn aduysyon rydygnge on the serpent / Thenne he told syr Percyuale how our lord Ihesu Cryst bete hym oute of heuen for his synne the whiche was the moost bryghtest angel of heuen / & therfore he loste his herytage / and that was the champyon that thow foughtest with alle / the whiche had ouercome the / had not the grace of god ben / Now beware syre Percyuale and take thys for an Ensample / and thenne the good man vanysshed awey / Thenne sire Percyual took his armes / and entryd in to the shyp / and soo departed from thens

¶ here endeth the fourtenthe booke / whiche is of syr percyual

 

¶ And here foloweth of syre launcelot whiche is the fyftenth book

Book Fifteen: syre launcelot

Page  656 [leaf 328v]

¶ Capitulum primum

WHanne the Heremyte had kepte syr Launcelot thre dayes / the heremyte gate hym an hors / an helme / and a suerd /

¶ And thenne he departed about the houre of none And thenne he sawe a lytel hows / And whanne he came nere / he sawe a Chappel / and there besyde he sawe an old man that was clothed al in white ful rychely / and thenne sire launcelot saide god saue yow / god kepe yow sayd the good man / and make yow a good knyghte / Thenne syr Launcelot alyghte and entred in to the Chappel / and there he sawe an old man dede in a whyte shert of passyng fyne clothe /

¶ Sir said the good man this man that is dede oughte not to be in suche clothynge as ye see hym in / for in that he brake the othe of hys ordre // For he hath ben more than an C wynter a man of a relygyon / And thenne the good man and sire Launcelot wente in to the Chappel / and the good man tooke a stole aboute hys neck and a book / and thenne be coniured on that book / & with that they sawe in an hydous fygure & horryble / that there was no man soo hard herted nor soo hard but he shold haue ben aferd / Thenne saide the fende thow hast trauaylled me gretely / Now telle me what thou wilt with me / I wille saide the good man that thow telle me how my felawe became dede / & whether he be saued or dampned / Thenne he said with an horryble voys / he is not lost but saued / how may that be sayd the good man / It semed to me that he lyued not wel / for he brake his ordre for to were a sherte / where he oughte to were none / And who that trespaceth ageynst our ordre dothe not wel / Not soo sayd the fende this man that lyeth here dede was come of a grete lygnage / and there was a lord that hyghte the erle de Vale that helde grete werre ageynste this mans neuewe the whiche hyghte Aguarus And soo this Aguarus sawe the Erle was byggar than he / Thenne he wente for to take counceylle of his vnkel the which lyeth here dede as ye maye see /

¶ And thenne he asked leue & wente oute of his heremytage Page  657 [leaf 329r] for to mayntene his neuewe ageynst the myghty Erle / and so hit happed that this man that lyeth here dede dyd so moche by his wysedome and hardynes that the Erle was take and thre of his lordes by force of this dede man /

¶ Capitulum ij

THenne was there pees betwyxe the Erle and this Aguarus / & grete seurte that the erle shold neuer werre ageynst hym / Thenne this dede man that here lyeth came to this heremytage ageyne / And thenne the erle made two of his neuewes for to be auenged vpon this man / Soo they came on a day / and fonde this dede man at the sacryng of his masse / and they abode hym tyl he had sayd masse / And thenne they set vpon hym and drewe oute swerdes to haue slayne hym / But there wold no suerd byte on hym more than vpon a gad of stele for the hyghe lord whiche he serued / he hym preserued /

¶ Thenne made they a grete fyre and dyd of alle his clothes and the hayre of his bak / And thenne this dede man heremyte sayd vnto them / wene ye to brenne me / it shalle not lye in your power nor to perysshe me as moche as a threde & there were ony on my body / Noo sayd one of them / hit shalle be assayed / & thenne they dispoylled hym / and putte vpon hym this sherte / and cast hym in a fyre / and there he laye all that nyȝt tyl hit was daye in that fyre and was not dede / and soo in the morn I came and fond hym dede / but I fond neyther threde nor skynne tamyd / & soo tooke hym oute of the fyre with grete fere and leyd hym here as ye may see / And now may ye suffer me to goo my way / for I haue sayd yow the sothe / And thenne he departed with a grete tempest / Thenne was the good man and syr launcelot more gladder than they were to fore / And thenne syr launcelot dwelled with that good man that nyght Sire said the good man be ye not sir launcelot du lake / ye sire said he / what seke ye in this countrey / syr sayd syr launcelot I goo to seke the aduentures of the Sancgreal / wel sayd he seke it ye may wel / But though it were here ye shalle haue noo power to see hit no more than a blynd man shold see a bryȝte suerd / and that is longe on your synne / and els ye were morePage  658 [leaf 329v] abeler than ony man lyuynge / And thenne sir launcelot began to wepe / Thenne sayd the good man were ye confessid syth ye entryd in to the quest of the Sancgreal / ye sir sayd syr launcelot / Thenne vpon the morne whanne the good man had songe his masse / thenne they buryed the dede man / Thenne syr launcelot sayd / fader what shalle I do / Now sayd the good man / I requyre yow take this hayre that was this holy mans and putte it nexte thy skynne / and it shalle preuaylle the gretely / syr and I wille doo hit sayd sir launcelot / Also I charge you that ye ete no flesshe as longe as ye be in the quest of the sancgreal / nor ye shalle drynke noo wyne / and that ye here masse dayly and ye may doo hit / Soo he took the hayre and putte it vpon hym and soo departed at euensonge tyme / And soo rode he in to a foreste / and there he mette with a gentylwoman rydynge vpon a whyte palfrey / and thenne she asked hym syre knyght whyder ryde ye / Certes damoysel sayd launcelot I wote not whyder I ryde but as fortune ledeth me / A syre launcelot said she / I wote what aduenture ye seke / for ye were afore tyme nerer than ye be now / and yet shalle ye see hit more openly than euer ye dyd / and that shalle ye vnderstande in shorte tyme / Thenne syr launcelot asked her where he myghte be herberowed that nyghte / ye shalle not fynde this day nor nyghte but to morne ye shal fynde herberowe good and ease of that ye be in doubte of / And thenne he commaunded her vnto god / Thenne he rode tyl that he cam to a crosse and took that for his hoost as for that nyghte

¶ Capitulum Tercium

ANd soo he putte his hors to pasture / and dyd of hys helme and his shelde and made his prayers vnto the Crosse that he neuer falle in dedely synne ageyne / And soo he leyd hym doune to slepe / And anone as he was on slepe / hit befelle hym there an aduysyon / that there came a man afore hym alle by compas of sterres / and that man had a crowne of gold on his hede / and that man ledde in his felaushyp seuen kynges and two knyghtes / And alle these worshipped the Crosse knelyng vpon their knees / holdyng vp their handes Page  659 [leaf 330r] toward the heuen / And alle they sayd fair swete fader of heuen come and vysyte vs and yelde vnto vs eueryche as we haue deserued / Thenne loked launcelot vp to the heuen / and hym semed the cloudes dyd open / and an old man came doun with a company of angels / and alyghte amonge them / & gafe vnto eueryche his blessynge and called them his seruauntes / and good and true knyghtes / And whanne this old man had sayd thus he came to one of tho knyghtes and sayd I haue lost alle that I haue sette in the / For thou hast rulyd the ageynste me as a warryour and vsed wrong werres with vayne glory more for the pleasyr of the world than to please me / therfor thow shalt be confounded withoute thow yelde me my tresour / Alle this aduysyon sawe sir Launcelot at the Crosse / And on the morne he took his hors and rode tyl mydday / and there by aduenture he mette with the same knyght that took his hors / helme and his suerd whan he slepte whan the Sancgreal appiered afore the crosse / whanne sire launcelot sawe hym / he salewed hym not fayre but cryed on hyghe / knyghte kepe the / for thow hast done to me grete vnkyndenes / And thenne they put afore them their speres / and sir launcelot came soo fyersly vpon hym / that he smote hym and his hors doune to the erthe / that he had nyghe broken his neck / Thenne sir Launcelot tooke the knyghtes hors that was his owne afore hand / and descended from the hors he sat vpon and mounted vpon his own hors and teyed the knyghtes owne hors to a tree that he myght fynde that hors whanne that he was arysen

¶ Thenne sir launcelot rode tyl nyghte / and by aduentur he met an heremyte / and eche of hem salewed other / and there he rested with that good man alle nyght / and gaf his hors suche as he myghte gete / Thenne sayde the good man vnto Launcelot / of whens be ye / syr sayd he I am of Arthurs courte / and my name is sir launcelot du lake / that am in the Quest of the Sancgreal / And therfor I pray yow to counceylle me of a vysyon the whiche I hadde et the Crosse / And soo he tolde hym alle /

¶Capitulum quartum

Page  660 [leaf 330v]

¶ Capitulum Quartum

 

LOo sir launcelot said the good man / there thou myȝtest vnderstande the hyghe lygnage that thou art comen of / And thyne aduysyon betokeneth after the passion of Ihesu Criste fourty yere Ioseph of Armathye preched the vyctory of kynge Euelake / that he had in the batails the better of his enemyes of the seuen kynges and the two knyghtes / the fyrst of hem is called Nappus an holy man / and the second hyghte Nacyen in remembraunce of his graunte syre / and in hym dwelled oure lord Ihesu Cryst / And the thyrd was called Hellyas le grose / and the fourth hyght Lysays / and the fyfthe hyghte Ionas / he departed out of his countrey and went in to walys / and toke there the doughter of Manuel / where by he had the lond of Gaule / and he came to dwelle in this countrey / And of hym came kynge launcelot thy graūte syre / the whiche there wedded the kynges doughter of Irland and he was as worthy a man as thow art / and of hym cam kynge Ban thy fader the which was the last of the seuen kynges / and by the sir launcelot hit sygnefyeth that the Angels sayd thou were none of the seuen felauships / and the laste was the ix knyght / he was sygnefyed to a lyon / for he shold passe all maner of erthely knyghtes / that is syre Galahad / the whiche thow gate on kynge Pelles doughter / and thou ought to thanke god more than ony other man lyuynge / for of a synner erthely thow hast no piere as in knyghthode nor neuer shalle be / But lytyl thanke hast thou gyuen to god for al the grete vertues that god hath lent the /

¶ Syr said Launcelot ye saye that that good knyȝt is my sone That ouȝtest thow to knowe and no man better said the good man / For thow knewest the doughter of kyng Pelles flesshely / and on her thow begattest Galahad / And that was he that at the feest of Pentecost satte in the sege peryllous / And therfor make thow hit knowen openly that he is one of thy begetynge on kynge Pelles doughter / for that wyl be youre worship and honour and to alle thy kynred / And I coūceyle yow in no place prece not vpon hym to haue Page  661 [leaf 331r] adoo with hym / wel sayd launcelot / me semeth that good knyghte shold praye for me vnto the hyghe fader / that I falle not to synne ageyne / Trust thow wel sayd the good man thou faryst mykel the better for his prayer / but the sone shall not bere the wyckednes of the fader / Nor the fader shalle not bere the wyckednes of the sone / but eueryche shalle bere his owne burthen / And therfor beseke thow only god / and he wylle helpe the in alle thy nedes / And thenne syr launcelot and he wente to souper / and soo leyd hym to rest / and the hayre prycked so syr launcelots skynne whiche greued hym ful sore / but he toke hit mekely / and suffred the payne / and soo on the morne / he herd his masse and took his armes / and soo toke his leue /

¶ Capitulum Quintum

ANd thenne mounted vpon his hors / and rode in to a forest / and helde no hyhe waye / And as he loked afore hym / he sawe a fayre playne / and besyde that a fayre Castel / & afore the Castel were many pauelions of sylke & of dyuerse hewe / And hym semed that he sawe there fyue honderd knyȝtes rydynge on horsbak / and there were two partyes / they that were of the Castel were all in blak horses and their trappours blak / and they that were withoute were al on whyte horses & trappours / and eueryche hurteled to other that it merueylled syr launcelot / And at the laste hym thoughte they of the castel were putte to the werse / Thenne thoughte sir launcelot for to helpe there the weyker party in encrecynge of his chyualry And soo syr launcelot threst in among the party of the Castel and smote doune a knyghte hors and man to the erthe / And thenne he rasshed here and there and dyd merueyllous dedes of armes / And thenne he drewe oute his suerd / and strake many knyghtes to the erthe / so that alle tho that sawe hym merueylled that euer one knyghte myghte doo soo grete dedes of armes / But alweyes the whyte knyghtes helde them nyghe aboute syr launcelot for to tyere hym and wynde hym / But att the laste as a man may not euer endure syre Launcelot waxed so faynt of fyȝtyng & trauaillyng & was so wery Page  662 [leaf 331v] of his grete dedes / but he myghte not lyfte vp his armes for to gyue one stroke so that he wende neuer to haue borne armes / & thenne they alle took and ledde hym awey in to a forest / and there made hym to alyghte & to reste hym / And thenne all the felaushyp of the castel were ouercome for the defaute of hym / Thenne they sayd alle vnto syr launcelot blessid be god / that ye be now of oure felaushyp / for we shalle holde yow in oure pryson / and soo they lefte hym with fewe wordes / And thenne syr launcelot made grete sorowe / for neuer or now was I neuer at turnement nor Iustes but I had the best / and now I am shamed / and thenne he sayd now I am sure that I am more synfuller than euer I was / thus he rode sorowynge / and half a day he was oute of despayre / tyl that he came in to a depe valey / And whanne syr launcelot sawe he myghte not ryde vp in to the montayne / he there alyghte vnder an Appel tree / and there he lefte his helme and his shelde / and put his hors vnto pasture / And then he leid hym doune to slepe / And thenne hym thoughte there came an old man afore hym / the whiche sayd A launcelot of euylle feythe and poure byleue / wherfor is thy wille tourned soo lyghtely toward thy dedely synne / And whanne he had sayd thus / he vanysshed away / & launcelot wyst not where he was become / Thenne he tooke his hors and armed hym / And as he rode by the way he sawe a chappel where was a recluse whiche hadde a wyndowe that she myghte see vp to the Aulter / And alle aloude she called launcelot / for that he semed a knyghte erraunt / And thenne he came and she asked hym what he was / and of what place / & where aboute he wente to seke

¶ Capitulum Sextum

ANd thenne he told her alle to gyder word by word and the trouthe how it befelle hym at the turnement / And after told her his aduysyon that he had had that nyghte in his slepe / and prayd her to telle hym what hit myght mene / for he was not wel contente with hit /

Page  663 [leaf 332r] ¶ A Launcelot sayd she as longe as ye were knyghte of erthely knyghthode / ye were the moost merueillous man of the world and moost aduenturous /

¶ Now said the lady sythen ye be sette amonge the knyghtes of heuenly aduentures / yf aduenture felle the contrary at that turnement / haue thou no merueille / for that turnement yesterdaye was but a tokenynge of oure lord / And not for thenne there was none enchauntement for they at the turnement were erthely knyghtes / The turnemēt was a token to see who shold haue most knyghtes outher Clyazar the sone of kynge Pelles or Argustus the sone of kynge Harlon / But Clyazar was alle clothed in whyte / and Argustus was couered in blak the whiche were comen / Alle what this betokeneth I shalle telle yow /

¶ the daye of Pentecost whan kynge Arthur helde his court / it befelle that erthely kynges and knyghtes toke a turnement to gyders / that is to say the quest of the Sancgreal / The erthely knyghtes were they / the whiche were clothed al in black / and the couerynge betokeneth the synnes wherof they be not confessid / And they with the couerynge of whyte betokeneth vyrgynyte / and they that chosen chastyte / And thus was the quest begonne in them / Thenne thow behelde the synners and the good men / and when thow sawest the synners ouercomē / thow enclynest to that party for bobaunce and pryde of the world / and alle that must be lefte in that quest /

¶ For in this quest thow shalte haue many felawes and thy betters / For thow arte soo feble of euylle truste and good byleue / this made hit whan thou were there where they took the / and ledde the in to the forest / And anone there appiered the Sancgreal vnto the whyte knyghtes / but thow was soo feble of good byleue and feyth that thou myghtest not abyde hit for alle the techynge of the good man / but anone thou tornest to the synners / and that caused thy mysauenture that thow sholdest knowe good from euylle / and vayne glory of the world / the whiche is not worth a pere And for grete pryde thou madest grete sorow that thou haddest not ouercome alle the whyte knyghtes with the keueryng of whyte by whome was betokeneth vyrgynyte & chastyte / & therfor god was wroth with yow / for god loueth no suche dedes in this quest / & this aduision signefyeth þt thou were of euil Page  664 [leaf 332v] feythe and of poure byleue / the whiche wille make the to falle in to the depe pytte of helle yf thow kepe the not

¶ Now haue I warned the of thy vayne glory / and of thy pryde / that thow hast many tymes erryd ageynst thy maker beware of euerlastynge payne / for of alle erthely knyghtes I haue moost pyte of the / for I knowe wel thow hast not thy pyere of ony erthely synful man / And soo she commaunded syr launcelot to dyner / And after dyner he toke his hors and commaunded her to god / and soo rode in to a depe valeye / and there he sawe a ryuer and an hyhe montayn / And thorou the water he must nedes passe / the whiche was hydous / and thenne in the name of god he took hit with good herte / and when he came ouer / he sawe an armed knyghte hors and man black as ony beare without ony word he smote syr launcelots hors to the erthe / and soo he passed on he wyst not where he was become / And thenne he took his helme and his shelde / & thanked god of his aduenture

¶ here leueth of the story of syr launcelot

 

¶ And speke we of sir Gawayne the whiche is the xvj book

Book Sixteen: sir Gawayne

¶ Capitulum primum

WHanne sire Gawayne was departed from his his felaushyp / he rode long withoute ony aduenture / For he fond not the tenth parte of aduenture as he was wonte to doo / For syre Gawayn rode from whytsontyde vntyl Mychelmasse And fonde none aduenture that pleasyd hym / Soo on a daye it befelle Gawayne mette with sir Ector de marys / and eyther made grete Ioye of other / that it were merueylle to telle / And soo they told eueryche other and complayned them gretely that they coude fynde none aduenture /

¶ Truly sayd fyre Gawayne vnto syre Ector I am nyghe wery of this quest / and loth I am to folowe further in straūge Page  665 [leaf 333r] Countreyes / one thynge merueilled me sayd syre Ector I haue mette with twenty knyghtes felawes of myn / and al they complayne as I doo / I haue merueille said syr Gawayne where that syr launcelot your broder is / Truly said sire Ector I can not here of hym nor of syr Galahad / Percyuale nor syr Bors / lete hem be sayd syre Gawayne / for they foure haue no pyeres / And yf one thyng were not in syr launcelot / he had no felawe of none erthely man / but he is as we be / but yf he took more payne vpon hym / But and these four be mette to gyders / they wille be lothe that ony man mete with hem / for and they fayle of the Sancgreal / hit is in waste of alle the remenaunt to recouer hit / Thus as Ector and Gawayne rode more than eyghte dayes / And on a saterday they fond an old chappel the whiche was wasted that there semed no man thyder repayred / and there they alyghte / and sette their speres att the dore / and in they entryd in to the chappel / and there made their orysons a grete whyle / And thenne sette hem doune in the seges of the chappel / And as they spak of one thyng and other / for heuynes they felle on slepe / and there befelle hem both merueyllous aduentures / Sir Gawayn hym semed he cam in to a medowe ful of herbes and floures / And there he sawe a rake of bulles an honderd and fyfty that were prowd & blak sauf thre of hem were al whyte and one had a blak spot / and the other two were soo fayre and soo whyte that they myght be no whyter / And these thre bulles whiche were soo fayre were teyed with two stronge cordes / And the remenaunt of the bulles sayd among hem goo we hens to seke better pasture / and so some wente / and some came ageyne / but they were so lene that they myghte not stande vp ryghte / and of the bulles that were soo whyte that one came ageyne and no mo / But whan this whyte bulle was come ageyne amonge these other / there rose vp a grete crye for lack of wynde þt fayled them / And so they departed one here and another there / this aduyson befelle Gawayne that nyght

¶ Capitulum Secundum

Page  666 [leaf 333v]

BVt to Ector de marys befelle another vysyon the contrary / For hit semed hym that his broder syre launcelot and he alyghte oute of a chayer and lepte vpon ij horses / and the one sayde to the other go we seke that we shal not fynde / and hym thoughte that a man bete syr launcelot / and despoylled hym / and clothe hym in another aray the whiche was al ful of knottes / and sette hym vpon an asse / and so he rode tylle he cam to the fayrest welle that euer he sawe / and syre Laūcelot alyghte and wold haue dronke of that welle / And whan he stouped to drynke of the water the water sanke from hym /

¶ And whanne syre launcelot sawe that he torned and wente thyder as the hede come fro / And in the meane whyle he trowed that hym self and syr Ector rode tyl that they cam to a ryche mans hows where there was a weddynge / And there he sawe a kynge / the whiche sayd syr knyghte here is no place for yow / and thenne he torned ageyne vnto the chayer that he came fro / Thus within a whyle bothe Gawayne and Ector awaked / and eyther told other of their aduysyon / the whiche merueylled them gretely / Truly sayd Ector I shalle neuer be mery tyl I here tydynges of my broder launcelot /

¶ Now as they sat thus talkyng they sawe an hand sheuyng vnto the elbowe / and was couerd with reed Samyte / And vpon that henge a brydel not ryght ryche / and helde within the fyst a grete candel whiche brenned ryght clere / and soo passed afore them / and entryd in to the chappel / and thēne vanysshed awey and they wyst not where / And anone came doune a voyse whiche sayd knyghtes ful euylle feyth and of poure byleue these two thynges haue fayled yow / and therfor ye may not come to the aduentures of the sancgreal / Thenne fyrst spak Gawayne and sayd Ector haue ye herd these wordes / ye truly said sir Ector I herd alle / Now goo we sayd syre Ector vnto some heremyte that wille telle vs of our aduysyon / for hit semeth me we labour alle in vayne / and soo they departed and rode in to a valeye and there mette with a squyer whiche rode on an hakney / and they salewed hym fayre / Sire sayd Gawayne can thou teche vs to ony heremyte / Here is one in a lytel montayne / but hit is soo rough there may no hors go thyder / and therfore ye muste goo vpon foote / there shalle ye fynde Page  667 [leaf 334r] a poure hows / and there is nacyen the heremyte which is the holyest man in this countrey / and so they departed eyther from other / And thenne in a valey they mette with a knyghte al armed whiche profered hem to Iuste as fer as he sawe them / In the name of god sayd syr Gawayne / sythe I departed from camelot / there was none profered me to Iuste but ones / and now Sir said Ector lete me Iuste with hym / Nay sayd Gawayne ye shalle not / but yf I be bete / hit shalle not forthynke me thenne yf ye goo after me / And thenne eyther enbraced other to Iuste and came to gyders as fast as their horses myghte renne / and brast their sheldes and the mayles / and the one more than the other / and Gawayne was wounded in the lyfte syde / but the other knyghte was smyten thorou the brest / and the spere cam oute on the other syde / and soo they felle bothe oute of their sadels / and in the fallynge they brak bothe their speres / Anone Gawayne aroos and sette his hand to his suerd / and caste his sheld afore hym / But alle for nought was it / for the knyght had no power to aryse ageyne hym / Thenne said gawayne ye must yelde you as an ouercome mā / or els I may slee you / A sir knyghte sayd he I am but dede / for goddes sake and of your gentilnes lede me here vnto an Abbay that I may receyue my creatour / Syre sayd Gawayne I knowe no hows of relygyon here by / Syr sayd the knyghte sette me on an hors to fore yow / and I shalle teche yow / Gawayne sette hym vp in the sadel / and he lepte vp behynde hym for to sustene hym / and soo came to an Abbay where they were wel receyued / and anone he was vnarmed / and receyued his creatour / Thenne he prayd Gawayne to drawe out the truncheon of the spere oute of his body / Thenne Gawayne asked hym what he was that knewe hym not / I am sayd he of kynge Arthurs courte / & was a felawe of the round table / and we were bretheren sworne to gyders / and now syr Gawayne thow hast slayne me / and my name is Vwayne les auoultres that somtyme was sone vnto kynge Vryens / and was in the quest of the Sancgreal / & now forgyue it the god / for hit shal euer be sayd that the one sworn broder hath slayn thotherr /

Page  668 [leaf 334v]

¶ Capitulum Tercium

ALlas sayd Gawayne that euer this mysauenture is befallen me / No force sayd Vwayne sythe I shalle dye this deth / of a moche more worshypfuller mans hand myghte I not dye / but whanne ye come to the Court / recommaunde me vnto my lord kynge Arthur and alle tho that ben lefte on lyue / and for old brotherhode thynke on me / Thenne beganne Gawayne to wepe and Ector also / And thenne Vwayne hym self and syre Gawayne drewe oute the truncheon of the spere / and anone departed the soule from the body / Thēne sir Gawayne and sir Ector beryed hym as men oughte to berye a kynges sone / and made wryten vpon his name / & by whome he was slayne / Thenne departed Gawayne and Ector as heuy as they myghte for their mysauentur / and so rode til that they came to te rouȝ montayne / and there they teyed their horses and wente on foote to the heremytage / And whanne they were come vp / they sawe a poure hows / & besyde the chappel a lytyl courtelage / where Nacyen the heremyte gadred wortes as he whiche had tasted none other mete of a grete whyle And whanne he sawe the erraunt knyghtes / he came toward them and salewed them / and they hym ageyne / Faire lordes said he what aduentur brought yow hyther / Syr said Gawayn to speke with yow for to be confessid / Sir said the heremyte I am redy / thenne they told hym soo moche that he wyst well what they were / And thenne he thoughte to counceylle hem yf he myght / Thenne began gawayne fyrst & told hym of his aduysyon that he had in the Chappel / and Ector told hym alle as it is afore reherced / Sir said the heremyte vnto sir Gawayne the fayr medowe and the rak therin ought to be vnderstande the round table / and by the medowe oughte to be vnderstande humylyte and pacyence / tho ben the thynges whiche ben alweyes grene and quyck / for men maye no tyme ouercome humylyte and pacyence / therfor was the round table foūden and the Chyualry hath ben at alle tymes / soo by the fraternyte whiche was there that she myght not be ouercomen / For men sayd she was founded in pacyence and in humylyte at the Page  669 [leaf 335r] Rake ete an honderd and fyfty bulles / but they ete not in the medowe / for their hertes shold be sette in humylyte and pacyence / and the bulles were prowde and blak sauf only thre By the bulles is to vnderstande the felaushyp of the round table whiche for their synne and their wyckednes ben black / Blaknes is to saye withoute good or vertuous werkes / and the thre bulles which were whyte sauf only one that was spotted / The two whyte bitokenen syr Galahad and sir percyual for they be maydens clene and withoute spotte / And the thyrd that had a spot sygnefyeth syr Bors de ganys / which trespaced but ones in his vyrgynyte / but sythen he kept hym self so wel in chastyte that alle is forgyuen hym and his mysdedes And why tho thre were teyed by the neckes / they be thre knyghtes in vyrgynyte and chastyte / and there is no pryde smyten in them / And the blak bulles whiche sayd goo we hens / they were tho whiche at Pentecost atte the hyhe feest took vpon hem to goo in the quest of the Sancgreal / withoute confession they myghte not entre in the medowe of humylyte and pacyence / And therfor they retorned in to waste countreyes / that sygnefyeth dethe / for there shalle dye many of them / eueryche of them shalle slee other for synne / and they that shalle escape / shalle be soo lene that hit shalle be merueylle to see them / And of the thre bulles withoute spotte / the one shalle come ageyne/ and the other two neuer

¶ Capitulum Quartum

THenne spak Nacyen vnto Ector sothe hit is that launcelot and ye came doune of one chayer / the chayer betokeneth maistership and lordshyp whiche ye came doune fro / But ye two knyghtes sayd the heremyte ye goo to seke that ye shalle neuer fynde that is the Sancgreal For hit is the secrete thynge of oure lord Ihesu Cryste / what is to meane thar syre Launcelot felle doune of his hors / he hath left pryde / and taken hym to humylyte / for he hath cryed mercy lowde for his synne and sore repented hym / and our lorde hath clothed hym in his clothyng whiche is ful of knottes that is the hayre that he weryth dayly /

¶ And the asse that he rode vpon is a beest of Page  670 [leaf 335v] humylyte / For god wold not ryde vpon no stede nor vpon no palfrey / So in ensample that an asse betokeneth mekenes that thou sawest syr Launcelot ryde on in thy slepe / and the welle where as the water sanke from hym whanne he shold haue taken therof / And whanne he sawe he myghte not haue it / he retorned thyder from whens he came / for the welle betokeneth the hyghe grace of god / the more men desyre hit to take hit / the more shalle be their desyre / Soo whanne he came nyghe the Sancgreal / he meked hym that he held hym not a man worthy to be soo nyghe the holy vessel / for he had ben soo defouled in dedely synne by the space of many yeres / yet whanne he kneled to drynke of the welle / there he sawe grete preuydence of the Sancgreal / And for he had serued soo longe the deuylle / he shal haue vengeaunce four and twenty dayes longe / for that he hath ben the deuyls seruaunt four and twenty yeres / And thenne soone after he shalle retorne vnto Camelot oute of this coūtrey and he shalle saye a parte of suche thynges as he hath fonde

¶ Now wille I telle yow what betokeneth the hande with the candel and the brydel / that is to vnderstande the holy ghost where charyte is euer / and the brydel sygnefyeth abstynence / For whanne she is brydeled in Crysten mans herte / she holdeth hym soo shorte that he falleth not in dedely synne / And the candell whiche sheweth clerenesse and syghte sygnefyeth the ryȝt way of Ihesu Cryst / And whanne he wente and sayd knyghtes of poure feythe and of wycked byleue / these thre thynges fayled charyte / abstynence / and trouth / therfor ye maye not atteyne that hyhe aduenturr of the Sancgreal

¶ Capitulum Quintum

CErtes sayd Gawayne / sothely haue ye sayd that I see it openly /

¶ Now I pray yow good man and holy fader telle me why we mette not with soo many aduentures as we were wonte to doo / and comynly haue the better /

¶ I shalle telle yow gladly sayd the good man / The aduenture of the Sancgreal whiche ye and many other haue vndertake þe quest of it & fynde it not / the cause is / for it appiereth Page  671 [leaf 336r] not to synners / wherfore merueylle not though ye fayle therof and many other / For ye be an vntrue knyghte / and a grete murtherer / and to good men sygnefyeth other thynges than murther / For I dar saye as synfull as syre launcelot hath ben sythe he went in to the quest of the Sancgreal / he slewe neuer man / nor nought shalle tyll that he come vnto Camelot ageyne / for he hath taken vpon hym for to forsake synne / And nere were that he nys not stable / but by his thoughte he is lykely to torne ageyne / he shold be nexte to encheue it sauf Galahad his sone / but god knoweth his thoughte and his vnstabylnesse / and yet shalle he dye ryght an holy man / and no doubte he hath no felawe of no erthely synful man / Sir sayd Gawayne hit semeth me by your wordes that for oure synnes it wylle not auaylle vs to trauaylle in this quest / Truly sayd the good man / there ben an honderd suche as ye be / that neuer shalle preuayle / but to haue shame / And whanne they had herd these voyces they commaunded hym vnto god /

¶ Thenne the good man called Gawayne and sayd it is longe tyme passed syth that ye were made knyghte / and neuer sythen thow seruedest thy maker / and now thow arte soo old a tree that in the is neyther lyf ne fruyte / wherfore bethynk the that thou yelded to oure lord the bare rynde / sythe the fende hath the leues and the fruyte / Syr said Gawayne & I had leyser I wold speke with yow / but my felawe here syr Ector is gone and abydeth me yonder bynethe the hylle / wel sayd the good man thow were better to be counceylled / Thenne departed Gawayne ande came to Ector / and soo took their horses & rode tyl they came to a fosters hows whiche herberowed them ryȝt wel / And on the morne they departed from theyr hooste / and rode longe or they coude fynde ony aduenture

¶ Capitulum Sextum

WHanne Bors was departed from Camelot / he mette with a Relygyous man rydynge on an asse / and syre Bors salewed hym / Anon the good man knewe hym that he was one of the knyȝtes erraunt that was in the quest of the Sancgreal / what are ye sayd the good man / Sire sayd Page  672 [leaf 336v] he / I am a knyȝte that fayn wold be counceylled in the quest of the Sancgreal / For he shall haue moche erthely worship that may brynge it to an ende / Certes sayd the good man that is sothe / for he shalle be the best knyghte of the world and the fairest of alle the felauship / But wete yow wel there shall none atteyne it but by clennes that is pure confession / So rode they to gyder tyl that they came to an heremytage / And there he prayd Bors to dwelle alle that nyghte with hym / and soo he alyghte and put awey his armour / and prayd hym that he myghte be confessid / and soo they wente in to the chappel / and there he was clene confessid / & they ete brede and drank water to gyder / Now sayd the good man I praye the that thow ete none other / tyl that thou sytte at the table where the Sancgreal shalle be / Sir sayd he I agree me therto / but how wete ye that I shall sytte there / yes sayd the good man that knowe I / but there shalle be but fewe of your felawes with yow / All is welcome sayd sir Bors that god sendeth me / Also said the good man / in stede of the sherte and in sygne of chastysement ye shal were a garment / therfor I pray yow doo of al your clothes and your sherte / and soo he dyd / And thenne he tooke hym a scarlet cote so that shold be in stede of his sherte / tyll he had fulfylled the quest of the Sancgreal / and the good man fond hym in soo merueillous a lyfe / and soo stable / that he merueilled and felte that he was neuer corrupte in flesshely lustes / but in one tyme that he begat Elyan le blank / Thenne he armyd hym and took his leue and so departed / And soo a lytel from thens he loked vp in to a tree / and there he sawe a passynge grete byrde vpon an olde tree / and hit was passyng drye withoute leues / and the byrd sat aboue and had byrdes the whiche were dede for honger / Soo smote he hym self with his bek the whiche was grete and sharpe / And soo the grete byrd bledde tyl that he dyed amonge his byrdes / And the yonge byrdes token the lyf by the blood of the grete byrd / whan Bors sawe this he wyst wel it was a grete tokenynge / For whanne he sawe the grete byrd arose not / thenne he tooke hys hors and yede his way / So by euensonge by aduentur he cam to a strong toure and an hyhe / & there was he lodged gladly / Page  673 [leaf 337r]

¶ Capitulum Septimum

ANd whanne he was vnarmed / they ledd hym in to an hyhe toure where was a lady yonge / lusty and fayre / And she receyued hym with grete Ioye / and made hym to sytte doune by her / and soo was he sette to soupe with flesshe / and many deyntees / And whanne syre Bors sawe that / he bethought hym on his penaunce and badde a squyer to brynge hym water / / And soo he broughte hym / and he made soppes therin / and ete them / A sayd the lady / I trowe ye lyke not my mete / yes truly sayd syr Bors / god thanke yow madame but I may ete none other mete this daye / thenne she spak nomore as at that tyme / for she was lothe to displease hym /

¶ Thenne after souper they spak of one thynge and other / With that came a squyer and sayd / Madame ye must purueye yow to morne for a champyon / for els your syster wille haue this castel and also your landes excepte ye can fynde a knyȝt that wille fyghte to morne in your quarel ageynst Prydam le noyre / Thenne she made sorowe and sayd / A lord god wherfor graunted ye to hold my lond wherof I shold now be disheryted withoute reason and ryghte / And whanne sire Bors had herd her say thus / he sayd I shalle comforte yow / Syr sayd she I shal telle yow there was here a kynge that hyghte Anyause / whiche held alle this land in his kepynge / Soo hit myshapped he loued a gentilwoman a grete dele elder that I Soo tooke he her alle this land to her kepyng / and all his men to gouerne / and she brought vp many euylle custommes where by she putte to dethe a grete party of his kynnesmen / And whanne he sawe that / he lete charce her oute of this land / and bytoke hit me / and alle this land in my demenys / but anone as that worthy kynge was dede / this other lady beganne to werre vpon me / and hath destroyed many of my men / & tourned hem ageynste me / that I haue wel nyghe no man lefte me And I haue nought els but this hyhe toure that she lefte me And yet she hath promysed me to haue this Toure withoute I can fynde a knyghte to fyghte with her Champyon / Now telle me sayd syr Bors / what is that Prydam le noyre / fyre sayd she he is the moost doubted man of thys land /

¶ Now Page  674 [leaf 337v] may ye send her word that ye haue fond a knyghte that shall fyghte with that Prydam le noyre in goddes quarel & yours / Thenne that lady was not a lytel glad / and sente word that she was purueyed / and that nyghte Bors had good chere / but in no bedde he wold come / but leyd hym on the floore / nor neuer wold doo otherwyse tyl that he had met with the quest of the Sancgreal /

¶ Capitulum Octauum

ANd anone as he was a slepe / hym befelle a vysyon / that there came to hym two byrdes / the one as whyte as a swan / and the other was merueyllous blak / but it was not soo grete as the other / but in the lykenes of a Rauen / thēne the whyte byrd came to hym / and sayd / and thou woldest gyue me mete and serue me / I shold gyue the alle the ryches of the world / And I shalle make the as fayre and as whyte as I am / Soo the whyte byrd departed / and there came the blak byrd to hym & sayd / & thou wolte serue me to morowe & haue me in no despyte / though I be blak / for wete thow wel / that more auayleth my blaknes than the others whytnes / and thenne he departed / and he had another vysyon / hym thoughte / that he came to a grete place whiche semed a chappel / & there he fonde a chayer sette on the lyfte syde whiche was worme eten / and feble / And on the ryghte hand were two floures lyke a lylye / and the one wold haue benome the others whytnes But a good man departed hem that touched not the other / & thenne oute of eueryche floure came oute many floures and fruyte grete plente / Thenne hym thoughte the good man sayd / shold not be doo grete foly that wold lete these two floures perysshe for to socoure the rotten tree that hit felle not to the erthe Syr sayd he / it semeth me that this woode myghte not auayle Now kepe the sayd the good man that thou neuer see suche aduenture befalle the / Thenne he awaked and made a sygne of the crosse in myddes of the forhede / and soo rose / & clothed hym and there came the lady of the place / and she salewed hym / & he her ageyne / and so wente to a chappel and herd their seruyse And ther came a companye of knyghtes that the lady had sent Page  675 [leaf 338r] for to lede sir Bors vnto bataille / Thenne asked he his armes And whanne he was armed / she prayd hym to take a lytyl morsel to dyne / Nay madame sayd he / that shalle I not do tyll I haue done my bataille by the grace of god / And soo he lept vpon his hors / and departed alle the knyghtes and men with hym / And as soone as these two ladyes mette to gyder / She whiche Bors shold fyghte for complayned her and sayd madame ye haue done me wronge to bireue me of my landes that kynge Anyaus gaf me / and ful lothe I am there shold be ony bataille / ye shalle not chese sayd the other lady or els youre knyghte withdrawe hym / Thenne ther was the crye made whiche party had the better of tho two knyghtes that his lady shold reioyse alle the lande / Now departed the one knyghte here / and the other there / Thenne they came gyders with suche a raundon that they perced their sheldes and their hauberkes / & the speres flewe in pyeces / and they wounded eyther other sore / Thenne hurteled they to gyders so that they felle both to the erthe / and their horses betwix their legges / and anone they arose and sette handes to their swerdes / and smote echone other vpon the hedes that they made grete woundes and depe that the blood wente oute of her bodyes / For ther fond sir Bors gretter defence in that knyght more than he wende / For that Prydam was a passynge good knyghte / and he wounded sir bors ful euyl and he hym ageyne / but euer this Prydam helde the stoure in lyke hard / That perceyued sire Bors and suffred hym tyl he was nyghe attaynte /

¶ And thenne he ranne vpon hym more and more/ and the other wente bak for drede of deth Soo in his withdrawynge he felle vp ryght / and syre Bors drewe his helme soo strongly that he rente hit fro his hede / and gafe hym grete strokes with the flatte of his swerd vpon the vysage / and bad hym yelde hym or he shold slee hym / Thenne he cryed hym mercy and sayd Faire knyght for goddes loue slee me not / and I shall ensure the neuer werre ageynst thy lady / but be alwey toward her / Thenne Bors lete hym be / thenne the old lady fledde with alle her knyghtes

¶ Capitulum ix

Page  676 [leaf 338v]

¶ Capitulum nonum

 

SOo thenne came Bors to alle tho that held landes of his lady / and sayd he shold destroye hem / but yf they dyd suche seruyse vnto her as longed to their landes / Soo they dyd their homage and they that wold not were chaced oute of their landes / Thenne befelle that yonge lady to come to her estate ageyne by the myghty prowesse of syr Bors de ganys Soo whan alle the countrey was wel set in pees / thenne syre Bors toke his leue and departed / and she thanked hym gretely / and wold haue gyuen hym grete rychesse but he refused hit / Thenne he rode alle that day tyl nyght / and came to an herberowe to a lady whiche knewe hym wel ynough / & maade of hym grete Ioye / Vpon the morne as soone as the day appiered / Bors departed from thens / and soo rode in to a foreste / vnto the houre of mydday / and there bifelle hym a merueyllous aduenture / So he mette at the departyng of the two wayes two knyghtes that ledde lyonel his broder al naked bounden vpon a straunge hakney / & his handes bounden to fore his brest And eueryche of hem helde in his handes thornes where with they wente betynge hym so sore that the blood trayled doune more than in an honderd places of his body / soo that he was al blood to fore and behynde / but he said neuer a word as he whiche was grete of herte / he suffred alle that euer they dyd to hym as though he had felte none anguysshe / Anone syre Bors dressid hym to rescowe hym that was his broder / and soo he loked vpon the other syde of hym / and sawe a knyghte whiche brought a fair gentylwoman / and wold haue set her in the thyckest place of the forest for to haue ben the more surer oute of the way from hem that sought hym / And she whiche was no thynge assured cryed with an hyghe voys Saynte mary socoure your mayde

¶ And anone she aspyed where syre Bors came rydynge / And whanne she came nygh hym / she demed hym a knyghte of the round table / wherof she hoped to haue some comforte / & thenne she coniured hym by the feythe that he ought vnto hym in whos seruyse thow arte entryd in / and for the feythe ye owe vnto the hyghe ordre of knyghthode / & for the noble kyng Page  677 [leaf 339r] Arthurs sake that I suppose that made the knyght that thow help me / and suffre me not to be shamed of this knyghte /

¶ Whanne Bors herd her saye thus / he had soo moche sorowe there he nyst not what to doo / For yf I lete my broder be in aduenture he must be slayne / and that wold I not for alle the erthe And yf I help not the mayde / she is shamed for euer / and also she shall lese her vyrgynyte / the whiche she shal neuer gete ageyne / Thenne lyfte he vp his eyen and sayd wepynge / Fair swete lord Ihesu Cryste whoos lyege man I am kepe Lyonel my broder that these knyghtes slee hym not / and for pyte of yow / and for Mary sake I shalle socoure this mayde /

¶ Capitulum x

THenne dressid he hym vnto the knyghte / the whiche had the gentylwoman / and thenne he cryed sir knyghte lete your hand of that mayden or ye be but dede / & thenne he sette doune the mayden / and was armed at alle pyeces sauf he lacked his spere / Thenne he dressid his sheld / and drewe oute his swerd / and Bors smote hym soo hard that it went thurgh his shelde and haberion on the lyfte sholder / and thorowe grete strengthe he bete hym doune to the erthe / and at the pullynge oute of Bors spere there he swouned /

¶ Thenne came Bors to the mayde / and sayd how semeth it yow of this knyghte / ye be delyuerd at this tyme /

¶ Now sir said she I praye yow lede me there as this knyghte hadde me soo shall I do gladly / & took the hors of the wounded knyȝght and sette the gentylwoman vpon hym / and soo broughte her as she desyred / Sir knyghte sayd she / ye haue better sped than ye wend / for and I had lost my maydenhede / fyue honderd men shold haue dyed for hit / what knyghte was he that had yow in the forest / by my feithe sayd she / he is my cosyn / So wote I neuer with what engyn the fende enchauffed hym / for yesterday he took me from my fader pryuely / for I nor none of my faders men mystrusted hym not / And yf he hadde hadde my maydenhede / he shold haue dyed for the synne & his body shamed & dishonoured for euer / Thus as she stood talkynge with hym there came twelue knyghtes sekyng after her / and anone she Page  678 [leaf 339v] told hem alle how Bors had delyuerd her / thenne they maad grete Ioye and besoughte hym to come to her fader a grete lord and he shold be ryght welcome / Truly sayd Bors that may not be at this tyme / for I haue a grete aduentur to doo in this countrey / Soo he commaunded hem vnto god and departed / Thenne syr Bors rode after Lyonel his broder by the trace of their horses / thus he rode sekyng a grete whyle / Thenne he ouertoke a man clothed in a Relygyous clothynge / and rode on a stronge black hors blacker than a bery / and sayd syre knyȝte what seke yow / Syre sayd he I seke my broder that I sawe within a whyle beten with two knyghtes / A Bors discomforte yow not / ne falle in to no wanhope / for I shall telle you tydynges suche as they ben / for truly he is dede / Thenne shewed he hym a newe slayne body lyenge in a busshe / and it semed hym wel that it was the body of Lyonel / and thenne he made suche a sorowe that he felle to the erthe all in a swoune / and lay a grete whyle there / And whanne he came to hym selfe / he said Faire brother syth the company of yow and me is departed shall I neuer haue Ioye in my herte / and now he whiche I haue take vnto my maister / he be my help / And whanne he had sayd thus / he toke his body lyghtely in his armes / and putte hit vpon the arson of his sadel / And thenne he sayd to the man canst thow telle me vnto somme chappel where that I may burye this body / Come on said he / here is one fast by / and soo longe they rood tyl they sawe a fayre Toure / and afore it there semed an old feble chappel / And thenne they alyght bothe and put hym in to a Tombe of marbel

¶ Capitulum xj

NOw leue we hym here sayd the good man / and goo we to oure herberowe tyl to morowe we wille come here ageyne to doo hym seruyse / Sir sayde Bors be ye a preest / ye forsothe sayd he / thenne I pray yow telle me a dreme that befalle to me þe last nyȝt / Say on sayd he / thenne he began soo moche to telle hym of the grete byrd in the forest / And after told hym of his byrdes one whyte / another black / and of Page  679 [leaf 340r] the rotten tree and of the whyte floures / syre I shalle telle yow a parte now and the other dele to morowe / The whyte foule betokeneth a gentylwoman fayre and ryche whiche loued the peramours / and hath loued the longe

¶ And yf thou warne her loue she shalle goo dye anone yf thou haue no pyte on her / that sygnefyeth the grete byrd / the whiche shalle make the to warne her /

¶ Now for noo fere that thou hast ne for no drede that thow haste of god / thow shalte not warne her but thou woldest not do hit for to be holden chast for to conquere the loos of the veyne glory of the world / for that shalle befalle the now and thou warne her that Launcelot the good knyghte thy cosyn shalle dye / And therfore men shalle now saye þt thow art a man sleer / both of thy broder syre Lyonel and of thy cosyn syre launcelot du lake / the whiche thow myghtest haue saued and rescowed easyly / But thow wenest to rescowe a mayde whiche perteyneth no thynge to the

¶ Now loke thow whether hit had ben gretter harme of thy broders deth or els to haue suffred her to haue lost her maydenhode /

¶ Thenne asked he hym haste thow herd the tokens of thy dreme the whiche I haue told to yow / Ye forsothe sayd syre Bors / alle youre exposycyon and declarynge of my dreme I haue wel vnderstande and herd / Thenne said the man in this black clothynge / thenne is hit in thy defaute yf sire Launcelot thy cosyn dye /

¶ Syre said bors that were me lothe / for wete ye wel there is no thynge in the world but I had leuer doo hit than to see my lord sire launcelot du lake to dye in my defaute Chese ye now the one or the other said the good man / And thenne he led syre Bors in to an hyghe Toure / and there he fonde knyghtes and ladyes tho ladyes sayde he was wel come / and soo they vnarmed hym /

¶ And whanne he was in his dobblet / men broughte hym a mantel furred with ermyn and putte hit aboute hym / and thenne they made hym suche chere that he hadde forgeten alle his sorowe and anguysshe / and only sette his herte in these delytes and deyntees / & tooke noo thoughte more for this broder syre Lyonel neyther of syre Launcelot du lake his cosyn / And anone came oute of a chamber to hym the fayrest lady that euer he sawe & more rycher Page  680 [leaf 340v] bysene than euer he sawe Quene Gueneuer or ony other estat Lo sayd they syre Bors here is the lady vnto whome we owe alle oure seruyse / and I trowe she be the rychest lady and the fayrest of alle the world / and the whiche loueth yow best aboue alle other knyghtes / for she wille haue no knyght but yow And whanne he vnderstood that langage he was abasshed / Not for thenne she salewed hym / and he her / and thenne they satte doune to gyders and spak of many thynges / in soo moche that she besoughte hym to be her loue / for she had loued hym abone alle erthely men / and she shold make hym rycher than euer was man of his age /

¶ Whanne Bors vnderstood her wordes / he was ryght euyll at ease / whiche in no maner wold not breke chastyte / soo wyst not he how to ansuer her /

¶ Capitulum xij

ALlas sayd she Bors shalle ye not doo my wylle / Madame said Bors / there is no lady in this world whos wylle I wylle fulfylle as of this thynge / for my broder lyeth dede whiche was slayne ryght late / A Bors sayd she I haue loued yow longe for the grete beaute I haue sene in yow / and the grete hardynes that I haue herd of yow that nedes ye must lye by me this nyghte / & therfor I praye yow graunte it me /

¶ Truly sayd he I shalle not doo hit in no maner wyse / thenne she made hym suche sorowe as though she wold haue dyed / wel Bors sayd she vnto this haue ye broughte me nyghe to myn ende / And there with she took hym by the hand / & badde hym behold her / and ye shal see how I shalle dye for your loue / A sayd thenne he that shalle I neuer see / Thenne she departed and wente in to an hyhe batilment / and led with her twelue gentylwymmen / and whan they were aboue one of the gentylwymmen cryed and sayd

¶ A syr Bors gentil knyghte haue mercy on vs all / and suffre my lady to haue her wil And yf ye doo not we muste suffre deth with oure lady for to falle doune of thys hyhe towre / And yf ye suffre vs thus to dye for soo lytel a thynge / alle ladyes and gentilwymmen wylle saye of you dishonour /

¶ Thenne loked he vpward Page  681 [leaf 341r] they semed alle ladyes of grete estate and rychely and well bysene / thenne had he of hem grete pyte / not for that he was vncounceiled in hym self that leuer he had they alle had loste their soules than he his / and with that they felle adoune alle at ones to the erthe / And whan he sawe that / he was al abasshed / and had therof grete merueylle / with that he blessyd his body and his vysage / And anone he herd a grete noyse & a grete crye as though alle the fendes of helle had ben aboute hym / and there with he sawe neyther toure ne lady ne gentylwoman nor no chappel where he broughte his broder to / Thenne helde he vp bothe his handes to the heuen and sayd / fayre fader god I am greuously escape / and thenne he tooke his armes and his hors and rode on his way / Thenne he herde a clok smyte on his ryght hand / and thydder he came to an Abbay on his ryght hand closyd with hyhe walles / and there was lete in / thenne they supposed that he was one of the quest of the Sancgreal / So they ledde hym in to a chamber and vnarmed hym / Syrs sayd syr Bors yf there be ony holy man in this hows / I pray yow lete me speke with hym / Thenne one of hem ledde hym vnto the Abbot whiche was in a Chappel / And thenne syr Bors salewed hym / and he hym ageyne / sir said Bors I am a knyght erraunt / and told hym all the aduenture whiche he had sene / Sir knyght syd the Abbot I wote not what ye be / for I wende neuer that a knyght of your age myghte haue ben soo strong in the grace of our lord Ihesu Cryst / Not for thenne ye shall go vnto your rest / for I wyll not counceyle yow this day / hit is to late / and to morowe I shalle counceyle yow as I can

¶ Capitulum xiij

ANd that nyghte was syre Bors serued rychely / and on the morne erly he herd masse / and the Abbot came to hym / and bad hym good morow / and Bors to hym ageyne / And thēne he told hym he was a felawe of the quest of the Sancgreal / and how he had charge of the holy man to ete brede and water /

¶ Thenne oure lord Ihesus Cryste shewed hym vnto yow in the lykenes of a sowle that suffred Page  682 [leaf 341v] grete anguysshe for vs syn he was putte vpon the crosse / and bledde his herte blood for mankynde / there was the token and the lykenes of the Sancgreal that appiered afore yow / for the blood that the grete foule bled reuyued the chyckens from deth to lyf / And by the bare tree is betokened the world whych is naked and withoute fruyte but yf hit come of oure lord / Also the lady for whome ye fought for and kyng Anyaus whiche was lord there to fore betokeneth Ihesu Cryste / whiche is kynge of the world / and that he foughte with the champyon for the lady / this hit betokeneth / for whanne he took the bataille for the lady / by her shall ye vnderstande the newe lawe of Ihesu Cryst and holy chirche / and by the other lady ye shalle vnderstand the old lawe and the fende whiche al day werrith ageynst holy chirche / therfor ye dyd your bataille with ryghte For ye be Ihesu Crystes knyghtes / therfor ye oughte to be defenders of holy chirche / And by the black byrd myghte ye vnderstande holy chirche whiche sayth I am blak / but he is faire And by the whyte byrd myghte men vnderstande the fende / & I shalle telle yow how the swan is whyte withoute forth and blak within / hit is ypocrysy whiche is withoute yelowe or pale / and semeth withoute forth the seruauntes of Ihesu Cryste but they ben within soo horryble of fylthe and synne and begyle the world euylle / Also whanne the fende appiered to the in lykenes of a man of relygyon and blamyd the that thow lefte thy broder / For a lady soo ledde the where thow semyd thy broder was slayne / but he is yet on lyue / and alle was for to putte the in errour and brynge the vnto wanhope and lechery / for he knewe thou were tendyr herted / & all was / for thou sholdest not fynde the blessid aduenture of the Sancgreal / and the thyrdde foule betokeneth the stronge bataille ageynst the fair ladyes whiche were alle deuyls / Also the drye tree and the whyte lylye the drye tree bitokeneth thy broder Lyonel whiche is drye withoute vertue / and therfore many men oughte to calle hym the rotten tree and the worme eten tree / for he is a murtherer and doth contrary to the ordre of knyghthode / And the two whyte floures sygnyfyen two maydens / the one is a knyght whiche was wounded the other day / and the other is the gentylwoman whiche ye rescowed and why the other Page  683 [leaf 342r] floure drewe nyghe the other / that was the knyghte which wold haue defowled her and hym self bothe / and syr Bors ye had ben a grete foole and in grete perylle for to haue sene tho two floures perysshe for to socoure the roten tree / for and they had synned to gyder they had ben dampned / and for that ye rescowed hem bothe / men myghte calle yow a veray knyghte and seruaunt of Ihesu Cryste /

¶ Capitulum xiiij

THenne wente sir Bors from thens and commaunded the Abbot vnto god / And thenne he rode alle that day and herberowed with an old lady / And on the morne he rode to a Castel in a valey / and there he mette with a yoman goynge a grete paas toward a foreste / Saye me sayd syre Bors canst thow telle me of ony aduenture / Syre sayd he / here shall be vnder this Castle a grete and a merueyllous turnement / of what folkes shal hit be sayd syr Bors / The erle of playns shal be in the one party / & the ladyes neuew of Heruyn on the other party / thenne bors thouȝt to be there yf he myȝt mete with his broder syr Lyonel or ony other of his felaushyp / whyche were in the quest of the Sancgreal / And thenne he torned to an hermytage that was in the entre of the foreste / And when he was come thyder / he fonde there syr Lyonel his broder whiche sat al armed at the entre of the Chappel dore for to abyde there herberowe tyl on the morn that the turnement shalle be / And whanne sir Bors sawe hym / he had grete Ioye of hym/ that it were merueil to telle of hys Ioye / And thenne he alyghte of his hors / and sayd fair swete broder whanne cam ye hydder / Anone as Lyonel sawe hym he said

¶ A Bors ye maye not make none auaunt / but as for you I myȝt haue ben slayn whan ye sawe two knyȝtes ledyng me awey betyng me ye lefte me for to socoure a gentilwoman / and suffred me in perylle of deth / for neuer erst ne dyd no broder to another so grete an vntrouthe / And for that mysdede now I ensure you but deth / for wel haue ye deserued it / therfore kepe the from hensforward / and that shal ye fynde as soone as I am armed / whan sir Bors vnderstood his broders wrath / he knelyd doune to Page  684 [leaf 342v] the erthe / and cryed hym mercy / holdyng vp both his handes and prayd hym to forgyue hym his euyll wylle / Nay sayd Lyonel that shalle neuer be and I maye haue the hyher hand that I make myn auowe to god / thow shalt haue dethe for it for it were pyte ye lyued ony lenger / Ryghte soo he wente in and took his harneis and mounted vpon his hors / and cam to fore hym and sayd / Bors kepe the from me / for I shall do to the as I wold to a felon or a traytour / for ye be the vntruest knyght that euer came oute of soo worthy an hows / as was kynge Bors de ganys / whiche was oure fader / therfore starte vpon thy hors / and soo shalle ye be moost at your auauntage And but yf ye wylle / I wille renne vpon yow there as ye stande vpon foote / and soo the shame be myn / and the harme yours / but of that shame ne reke I noughte / whan syr Bors sawe that he must fyghte with his broder or els to dye/ he nyst what to doo / thenne his herte counceyled hym not therto in as moche as Lyonel was borne or he / wherfor he ought to bere hym reuerence / yet kneled he doune afore Lyonels hors feet/ and sayd fair swete broder haue mercy vpon me / and sle me not / and haue in remembraunce the grete loue whiche oughte to be bitwene vs tweyne / what syr Bors sayd to Lyonel he roughte not / for the fende had broughte hym in suche a wyl that he shold slee hym / Thenne whanne Lyonel sawe he wold none other / and that he wold not haue rysen to gyue hym bataille/ he rasshed ouer hym so that he smote Bors with his hors feete vpward to the erthe / and hurte hym so sore that he swouned of distresse / the whiche he felte in hym self to haue dyed withoute confession / Soo whanne Lyonel sawe this / he alyghte of his hors to haue smyten of his hede / And soo he toke hym by the helme / and wold haue rente hit from his heed /

¶ Thenne came the heremyte rennyng vnto hym whiche was a good man and of grete age / and wel had herd alle the wordes that were bitwene them / and soo felle doune vpon syre Bors

¶ Capitulum xv

THenne he sayd to Lyonel A gentyl knyghte haue mercy vpon me and on thy broder / for yf thow slee hym / Page  685 [leaf 343r] thow shalte be dede of synne / and that were sorouful / for he is one of the worthyest knyghtes of the world / and of the best condycyons / Soo god me help sayd Lyonel syr preest / but yf ye flee from hym I shall slee yow / and he shalle neuer the sooner be quyte / Certes sayd the good man I haue leuer ye slee me than hym / for my dethe shalle not be grete harme not halfe soo moche as of his / wel sayd Lyonel I am greed / and sette his hand to his swerd and smote hym soo hard that his hede yede bakward / Not for that he restrayned hym of his euyll wylle / but took his broder by the helme and vnlaced hit to haue stryken of his hede / and had slayn hym withoute fayle but soo it happed Colgreuaunce a felawe of the round table cam at that tyme thyder as oure lordes wylle was / And whanne he sawe the good man slayne he merueylled moche what it myght be / And thenne he beheld Lyonel wold haue slayne his broder / and knewe syre Bors whiche he loued ryȝt wel Thenne starte he doune and toke Lyonel by the sholders and drewe hym strongly abak from Bors / and sayd Lyonel wylle ye slee your broder the worthyest knyghte of the world one / & that shold noo good man suffer / why sayd Lyonel / wylle ye lette me / therfor yf ye entermete yow in this I shall slee you and hym after / why sayd Colgreuaunce is this sothe that ye wille slee hym / slee hym wylle I sayd he / who so saye the contrary / For he hath done so moche ageynst me / that he hath wel deserued it / and soo ranne vpon hym / and wold haue smyten hym thurgh the hede / and sir Colgreuaunce ranne betwyx them and sayd & ye be so hardy to do soo more we two shal medle to gyders / when Lyonel vnderstood his wordes / he took his sheld afore hym / and asked hym what that he was / and he told hym Colgreuaunce one of his felawes / Thenne Lyonel defyed hym / and gaf hym a grete stroke thurgh the helme / Thenne he drewe his suerd / for he was a passyng good knyȝte / and defended hym ryȝt manfully / soo longe dured the batail that Bors rose vp all anguysshly & behelde Colgreuaunce the good knyght fought with his broder for his quarel / thenne was he full sory and heuy / and thoughte yf Colgreuaunce slee hym / that was his broder / he sholde neuer haue Ioye / And yf his broder slew Colgreuaūce the shame shold euer be myn / Thenne wolde Page  686 [leaf 343v] he haue rysen to haue departed them / but he had not soo moche myghte to stande on foote / soo he abode hym soo longe tyl Colgreuaunce had the werse / for Lyonel was of grete chyualrye and ryghte hardy / for he had perced the hauberk and the helme that he abode but dethe / For he had lost moche of his blood that it was merueylle that he myghte stande vp ryghte / Thenne beheld he syr Bors whiche sat dressynge hym vpward and said A Bors why come ye not to caste me oute of perylle of dethe wherin I haue put me to socoure yow whiche were ryght now nyghe the dethe / Certes said Lyonel that shall not auayle you for none of you shalle bere others waraunt / but that ye shalle dye bothe of my hand / when Bors herd that / he dyd soo moche he rose and putte on his helme / Thenne perceyued he fryste the heremyte preest whiche was slayne / thenne made he a merueillous sorowe vpon hym /

¶ Capitulum xvj

THenne ofte Colgreuauance cryed vpon syre Bors / Why wylle ye lete me dye here for your sake / yf it plese yow that I dye for yow the dethe / it wille please me the better for to saue a worthy man / with that word syre Lyonel smote the helme from his hede / Thenne Colgreuaunce sawe that he myght not escape / thenne he sayd Fair swete Ihesu that I haue mysdoo haue mercy vpon my sowle / For suche sorowe that my herte suffreth for goodenes and for almes dede that I wold haue done here / be to me a lygement of penaunce vnto my soules helthe / At these wordes Lyonel smote hym soo sore that he bare hym to the erthe / soo whanne he had slayne Colgreuaunce / he ranne vpon his broder as a fendly man / & gaf hym suche a stroke that he made hym stoupe / and he that was ful of humylyte prayd hym for goddes loue to leue this bataille / For and hit befelle fayre broder that I slewe yow or ye me / we shold be dede of that synne /

¶ Neuer god me help but yf I haue on yow mercy and I maye haue the better hand / Thenne drewe Bors his suerd al wepynge and sayd / Faire brother god knoweth myn entente / A fayre broder ye haue done ful euylle this daye to slee suche an holy preest the Page  687 [leaf 344r] whiche neuer trespast / Also y haue slayne a gentyl knyghte and one of oure felawes / And wel wote ye that I am not aferd of yow gretely / but I drede the wrathe of god / and this is an vnkyndely werre / therefore god shewe myracle vpon vs bothe / Now god haue mercy vpon me / though I defende my lyf ageynst my broder / with that Bors lyfte vp his hand / & wold haue smyten his broder /

¶ Capitulum xvij

ANd thēne he herd a voyce that sayd flee bors & touche hym not / or els thow shall slee hym / Ryght so alyȝt a clowde betwixe them in lykenes of a fyre and a merueyllous flamme that bothe her two sheltes brente /

¶ Thenne were they sore affrayed that they felle bothe to the erthe / and laye there a grete whyle in a swoune / And whanne they came to them self Bors sawe that his broder had no harme / thenne he held vp bothe his handes / for he dradde god had taken vengeaunce vpon hym / with that he herd a voyce saye Bors go hens and bere thy broder noo lenger felaushyp / but take thy way anone ryghte to the see / For sire Percyual abydeth the there / Thenne he sayd to his broder fayr swete broder forgyue me for goddes loue alle that I haue trespaced vnto yow / Thenne he ansuerd God forgyue it the and I doo gladly / So sir Bors departed from hym and rode the nexte way to the see / And at the last by fortune he came to an Abbay whiche was nygh the see / That nyght Bors rested hym there / and in his slepe there came a voice to hym & badde hym go to the see / thenne he starte vp and made a sygne of the Crosse in the myddes of his forhede and took his harneis and made redy his hors / and moūted vpon hym / And at a broken walle he rode oute / & rode soo long tyl that he came to the see / And on the strond he fond a shyp couerd all with whyte samyte / And he alyghte & bitoke hym to Ihesu Cryst / And as soone as he entryd in to the ship the shyp departed in to the see and wente so fast that hym semed the shyp wente fleynge / but hit was soone derke soo that he myght knowe no man / and soo he slepte tyl hit was daye Page  688 [leaf 344v] Thenne he awaked and sawe in myddes of the shyp a knyȝt lye alle armed sauf his helme / Thenne knewe he that hit was syr Percyual of walys / and thenne he made of hym ryȝt grete Ioye / but sir Percyual was abasshed of hym / and he asked hym what he was / A fayr syr sayd Bors knowe ye me not / Certes sayd he I merueylle how ye came hyther / but yf oure lord broughte yow hyder hym self / thenne syre Bors smyled and dyd of his helme / Thenne Percyual knewe hym / & eyther made grete Ioye of other that it was merueylle to here /

¶ Thenne Bors told hym how he came in to the shyp / and by whoos ammonysshement / and eyther told other of theyre temptacyons / as ye haue herd to fore hand /

¶ Soo wente they douneward in the see one whyle bakward another whyle forward / and eueryche comforted other / and ofte were in their prayers / thenne sayd syre Percyual we lak no thynge but Galahad the good knyghte

¶ And thus endeth the syxtenth book whiche is of syre Gawayne / Ector de marys / and syre Bors de ganys and sir Percyual

 

¶ And here foloweth the seuententh book whiche is of the noble knyghte syre Galahad /

¶ Capitulum primum

NOw saith this story whanne Galahad had rescowed Percyual from the twenty knyghtes / he yede tho in to a waste foreste / wherin he rode many Iourneyes / and he fonde many aduentures / the whiche he brought to an ende / wherof the story maketh here no mencyon / Thenne he toke his waye to the see on a daye / & hit befelle as he passed by a Castel where was a wonder turnement / but they withoute had done soo moche/ that they within were putte to the werse / yet were they wythin good knyghtes ynouȝ / whanne Galahad sawe that tho within were at soo grete a meschyef that men slewe hem att the entre of the Castel / thenne he thoughte to helpe hem / and putte a spere forth / and smote the fyrste that he slay to the erthe / and the spere brak to pyeces / thanne he drewe his suerd / and smote there as they were thyckest / and so he dyd wonderful dedes of armes / that alle they merueylled / thenne hit happed that Gawayne and sir Ector de marys were with the knyghtes withoute / But whanne they aspyed the whyte shelde with the reed Crosse / the one sayd to the other yonder is the good knyght sir Galahad the haute prynce / Now he shold be a grete foole / whiche shold mete with hym to fyghte / Soo by aduenture he came by sire Gawayne and he smote hym soo hard that he claf his helme and the coyfe of yron vnto his hede / so that Gawayn felle to the erthe / but the stroke was soo grete that it slented doune to the erthe and carfe the hors sholder in two / Whan Ector sawe Gawayne doune he drewe hym asyde / and thoughte it no wysedome for to abyde hym / and also for naturel loue that he was his vnkel / Thus thurgh his grete hardynesse he bete abak alle the knyghtes withoute / And thenne they within cam oute and chaced hem alle aboute / But whanne Galahad sawe ther wold none torne ageyne / he stale awey pryuely so that none wyst where he was bicome / Now by my hede sayd Gawayn to Ector now are the wonders true that were sayd of Launcelot du lake / that the swerd whiche stak in the stone shold gyue me suche a buffet þt I wold not haue it for the best Castell in this world / and sothely now hit is preued trewe for neuer Page  690 [leaf 345v] ere had I suche a stroke of mans hand / Sir sayd Ector me semeth your quest is done / and yours is not done sayd Gawayn but myn is done I shalle seke noo ferther / Thenne Gawayne was borne in to a Castel and vnarmed hym / and leyd hym in a ryche bedde / and a leche fonde that he myght lyue / & to be hole within a moneth / Thus Gawayne and Ector abode to gyder / For syre Ector wold not awey til Gawayne were hole / & the good knyȝt Galahad rode so long tyll he came that nyghte to the Castel of Carboneck / & hit befelle hym thus / that he was benyghted in an hermytage / Soo the good man was fayne whan he sawe he was a knyght erraunt / tho whan they were at rest / ther cam a gentilwoman knockyng at the dore / & called Galahad / and soo the good man cam to the dore to wete what she wold / Thenne she called the heremyte syre Vlfyn I am a gentylwoman that wold speke with the knyght whiche is with yow / Thenne the good man awaked Galahad / & badde hym aryse and speke with a gentylwoman that semeth hath grete nede of yow / Thenne Galahad wente to her & asked her what she wold / Galahad sayd she I will that ye arme you and moūte vpon your hors and folowe me / For I shall shewe yow within these thre dayes the hyest aduenture that euer ony knyght sawe / Anone Galahad armed hym and took his hors and commaunded hym to god / and badde the gentilwoman go and he wold folowe there as she lyked /

¶ Capitulum ij

SOo she rode as fast as her palfrey myght bere her tylle that she came to the see / the whiche was called Collybe And at the nyghte they came vnto a Castel in a valeye closed with a rennynge water and with stronge walles and hyhe / & soo she entred in to the Castel with Galahad and there had he grete chere for the lady of that Castel was the damoysels lady / soo whan he was vnarmed / thenne said the damoysels madame shalle we abyde here all this day / Nay sayd she but tylle he hath dyned and tyl he hath slepte a lytyl / so he ete and slepte a whyle tyl that the mayde called hym / and armed hym by Page  691 [leaf 346r] torche lyght / And whan the mayde was horsed and he bothe the lady took Galahad a fayr child and ryche / and so they departed from the Castel tyl they came to the see syde / & there they fond the shyp where Bors and Percyual were in / the whiche cryed on the shyps bord sir Galahad ye be welcome / we haue abyden yow longe / And whan he herd them / he asked them what they were / Sir said she leue your hors here / and I shall leue myn and toke her sadels and her brydels with them and made a crosse on them / and soo entryd in to the shyp / and the two knyghtes receyued hem bothe with grete Ioye / and eueryche knewe other / and soo the wynde aroos / and drofe hem thurgh the see in a merueyllous place / And within a whyle it dawyd / Thenne dyd Galahad of his helme & his suerd / & asked of his felawes from whens cam that fayre shyp / Truly sayd they ye wote as wel as we but of goddes grace / and thenne they told eueryche to other of alle theire hard aduentures / and of her grete temptacyons / truly sayd Galahad ye are moche bounden to god for ye haue escaped grete aduentures and had not the gentilwoman ben / I had not comen here / for as for yow I wend neuer to haue fond yow in these straunge countreyes / A Galahad saide Bors yf launcelot your fader were here / thenne were we wel at ease / for thenne me semed we fayled no thynge / That may not be sayde Galahad / but yf it pleasyd oure lorde / By thenne the shyp wente fro the londe of Logrys / and by aduenture it arryued vp betwix two roches passyng grete and merueyllous / but there they myght not londe / for there was a swalowe of the see / sauf there was another ship / and vpon it they myght goo withoute daunger / Goo we thyder sayd the gentylwoman / and there shalle we see aduentures / for soo is oure lordes wylle /

¶ And whanne they came thyder / they fond the ship ryche ynouȝ / but they fond neyther man ne woman therin / But they fonde in the ende of the ship two fayre letters wryten whiche sayd a dredeful word and a merueyllous / Thow man whiche shalle entre in to this shyp beware thou be in stedfast bileue for I am feith & therfor beware hou thou entrest / for & thou faile I shal not helpe the / thenne saide the gētilwoman Percyual wote ye what I am / Certes said nay to my wetynge /

¶ Wete you wel sayd she that I Page  692 [leaf 346v] am thy syster / whiche am doughter of kynge Pellenore / And therfore wete ye wel ye are the man in the world that I moost loue / And yf ye be not in parfyte byleue of Ihesu Cryst entre not in no maner of wyse / for thenne shold ye perysshe the shyp for he is soo parfyte / he wylle suffre no synner in hym / whanne Percyual vnderstode that she was his veray syster / he was inwardly glad and sayd / faire syster I shalle entre therin / For yf I be a mys creature or an vntrue knyghte there shalle I perysshe

¶ Capitulum Tercium

IN the meane whyle Galahad blessed hym / & entrid therin / and thenne next the gentylwoman / & thenne sir Bors & sir Percyual / And whan they were in / it was so merueyllous fayre and ryche that they merueylled / & in myddes of the shyp was a fayr bedde / & Galahad wente therto / & fond there a crowne of sylke / And at the feet was a swerd ryche & fayre / and hit was drawen oute of the shethe half a foot and more / and the suerd was of dyuerse facyons / and the pomel was of stone / and there was in hym alle manere of colours that ony man myght fynde / and eueryche of the colours hadde dyuerse vertues / and the skalys of the hafte were of two rybbes of dyuerse beestes / the one beest was a serpent whiche was conuersaunt in Calydone / and is called the serpent of the fend And the bone of hym is of suche a vertu that there is no hand that handeleth hym shalle neuer be wery nor hurte / and the other beest is a fysshe which is not ryght grete / and haunteth the flood of Eufrate / and that fysshe is called Ertanax / and his bones be of suche a maner of kynde that who that handeleth hem / shalle haue soo moche wille that he shalle neuer be wery and he shalle not thynke on Ioye nor sorow that he hath had But only that thynge that he beholdeth before hym / And as for this suerd there shalle neuer man begyrype hym at the handels but one / but he shalle passe alle other / In the name of god said Percyual I shall assaye to handle hit / Soo he sette his hand to the suerd / but he myghte not begrype hit / by my feyth said he now haue I fayled / Bors set his hand therto & fayled Thenne Galahad beheld the suerd and sawe letters lyke blood that sayd / lete see who shall assaye to drawe me oute of my Page  693 [leaf 347r] shethe / but yf he be more hardyer than ony other / & who that draweth me / wete ye wel that he shalle neuer fayle of shame of his body or to be wounded to the dethe / By my feyth said galahad I wold drawe this suerd oute of the shethe / but the offendynge is soo grete that I shalle not sette my hand therto Now sirs said the gentilwoman wete ye wel that the drawynge of this suerd is warned to alle men sauf al only to yow Also this shyp aryued in the realme of Logrys / and that tyme was dedely werre bytwene kynge labor whiche was fader vnto the maymed kynge and kynge Hurlame whiche was a Sarasyn / But thenne was he newely crystend / soo that men helde hym afterward one of the wyttyest men of the world / & soo vpon a day hit befelle that kynge Labor and kynge Hurlame had assembled their folke vpon the see where this shyp was aryued / and there kyng Hurlame was discomfyte / and his men slayne / and he was aferd to be dede / and fled to his shyp and there he fond this suerd and drewe hit / and cam oute and fond kyng Labor the man in the world of al crystendom in whome was thenne the grettest feythe /

¶ And when kynge Hurlame sawe kynge Labor he dressid this suerd / and smote hym vpon the helme soo hard that he clafe hym / and his hors to the erthe with the fyrst stroke of his suerd / and hit was in the realme of Logrys / and soo bifelle grete pestylence & grete harme to both Realmes / for sythen encrecyd neyther corne ne grasse nor wel nyghe no fruyte / ne in the water was no fysshe werfor men callen hit the landes of the two marches the waste land / for that dolorous stroke / And when kynge Hurlame sawe this suerd soo keruyng / he torned ageyne to fetche the scaubard / And soo came in to this shyp and entred and putt vp the suerd in the shethe / And as soone as he had done it / he felle doune dede afore the bedde / Thus was the swerd preued that none ne drewe it but he were dede or maymed / So laye he ther tyl a mayden cam in to the shyp / and cast hym oute / for there was no man so hardy of the world to entre in to shypthat for the defence

¶ Capitulum quartum /

Page  694 [leaf 347v]

ANd thenne beheld they the scaubard / hit semed to be of a serpentes skynne / And theron were letters of gold and syluer / and the gyrdel was but pourely to come to / and not able to susteyne suche a ryche suerd / and the letters sayd / he whiche shal welde me oughte to be more harder than ony other yf he bere me as truly as me oughte to be born For the body of hym whiche I oughte to hange by he shal not be shamed in no place whyle he is gyrd with this gyrdel / nor neuer none be soo hardy to doo awey this gyrdel / for it oughte not be done away but by the handes of a mayde / and that she be a kynges doughter and quenes / and she must be a mayde alle the dayes of her lyf / bothe in wylle and in dede / And yf she breke her vyrgynte she shalle dye the moost vylaynous dethe that euer dyd ony woman / Sir said Percyual torne this suerd that we may see what is on the other syde / & hit was reed as blood with blak letters as ony cole / whiche sayd / he that shal prayse me moost / moost shalle he fynde me to blame at a grete nede and to whome I shold be moost debonair shall I be most felon / and that shalle be at one tyme / Faire broder sayd she to Percyual it befelle after a fourty yere after the passion of Ihesu Cryst that Nacyen thy broder in lawe of kyng Mordrayns was boren in to a Towne more than xiiij dayes Iourneye from his countrey by the commaundement of our lord in to an yle / in to the partyes of the west that men clepyd the yle of Turnaunce / Soo befelle hit that he fond this shyp at the entre of a roche / and he fond the bedde and his suerd as we haue herd now / Not for thenne he had not soo moche hardynesse to drawe hit / and there he dwellid an eyght dayes / and at the nynythe day there felle a grete wynde whiche departed hym out of the yle and brought hym to another yle by a roche / and there he fond the grettest gyaunt that euer man myghte see / therwith cam that horryble gyaunt to slee hym / and thenne he loked aboute hym aad myghde not flee / and he had no thynge to defende hym with / Soo he ranne to his suerd / and when he sawe hit naked / he praysed it moche / and thenne he shoke it / and therwith he brak it in the myddes A said Nacyen the thyng that I moost praysed ought I now moost to blame / and ther with he threwe the pyeces of his suerd ouer his bedde / And after he Page  695 [leaf 348r] lepte ouer the borde to fyghte with we gyaunt / and slewe hym And anone he entryd in to the shyp ageyne / and the wynde arose / and drofe hym thurgh the see / that by aduenture he came to another shyp where kynge Mordrayns was / whiche hadde ben tempted ful euyll with a fende in the porte of peryllous roche / And whanne that one sawe the other / they made grete Ioye of other / and eyther told other of their aduenture / & how the swerd fayled hym at his moost nede / Whanne Mordrayns sawe the suerd he praysed hit moche / but the brekyng was not to doo / but by wyckednes of thy self ward / for thow arte in somme synne / and there he took the suerd / and sette the pecys to gyders / and they soudered as fayr as euer they were to fore / and there putte he the swerd in the shethe / and leyd it doune on the bedde / Thenne herd they a voyce that sayd go out of this ship a lytel whyle / and entre in to the other for drede ye falle in dedely synne / for and ye be fonde in dedely synne ye maye not escape but perysshe / and soo they wente in to the other shyp / And as Nacyen wente ouer the borde he was smyten with a swerd on the ryghte foote that he felle doune noselynge to the shyps bord / and there withe he sayd O god how am I hurte / and thenne there came a voyce and sayd / take thow that for thy forfette that thow dydest in drawynge of this suerd / therfor thow receyuest a wounde / for thow were neuer worthy to handel it / the wrytynge maketh mencyon / In the name of god said galahad ye ar ryȝt wyse of these werkes

¶ Capitulum v

SYr sayd she there was a kynge that hyghte Pelles the maymed kynge / And whyle he myghte ryde / he supported moche crystendome and holy chirche / Soo vpon a daye he hunted in a woode of his whiche lasted vnto the see / and at the last he loste his houndes / and his knyghtes / sauf only one / and there he and his knyghte wente tyl that they cam toward Irland / and there he fonde the shyp / And whanne he sawe the letters and vnderstood them / yet he entryd / for he was ryghte parfyte of his lyf / but his knyghte had none hardynes to entre & ther fonde he this suerd & drewe it oute as moche as ye maye see / Soo there with entryd a spere where with he was Page  696 [leaf 348v] smyte hym thurgh bothe the thyes / and neuer sythe myghte he be helyd ne nought shall to fore we come to hym / Thus said she was not kynge Pelles your graunte sir maymed for his hardynesse / In the name of god damoysel sayd Galahad / so they wente toward the bedde to behold al aboute hit / and aboue the hede ther henge two swerdes / Also there were two spyndels whiche were as whyte as ony snowe / and other that were as reed as blood / and other aboue grene as ony emeraude / of these thre colours were the spyndels and of naturel coloure within and withoute ony payntynge / These spyndels sayd the damoysel were whan synful Eue came to gadre fruyte / for whiche Adam and she were putte oute of paradyse / she tooke with her the bough on whiche the Appel henge on / Thenne perceyued she that the braunche was fayre and grene / and she remembryd her the losse whiche came fro the tree / Thenne she thoughte to kepe the braunche as longe as she myghte / And for she had no cofer to kepe hit in / she put it in the erthe / Soo by the wylle of our lord the braunche grewe to a grete tree within a lytil whyle / & was as whyte as ony snowe / braūches / bowes / and leues that was a token a mayden planted hit / But after god came to Adam and bad hym knowe his wyf flesshly as nature requyred / Soo lay Adam with his wyf vnder the same tree / and anone the tree whiche was whyte and ful grene as ony grasse and alle that came oute of hit / and in the same tyme that they medled to gyders there was Abel begoten / thus was the tree longe of grene colour / And so it befelle many dayes after / vnder the same tree Caym slewe Abel / wherof befelle grete merueil For anone as Abel had receyued the dethe vnder the grene tree he lost the grene colour and becam reed and that was in tokenyng of the blood / & anone alle the plantes dyed therof / but the tree grewe and waxed merueyllously fayre / & hit was the fayrest tree & the moost delectable that ony man myght beholde and see and so dyd the plantes that grewe out of it tofore that Abel was slayne vnder it / Soo longe dured the tree tyl that Salamon kynge Dauyds sone regned / and helde the londe after his fader / This Salamon was wyse and knewe alle the vertues of stones and trees / and soo he knewe the course of the sterres and many other dyuerse thynges Page  697 [leaf 349r] This Salamon had an euylle wyfe / where thurgh he wende that there had ben no good woman / and soo he despysed hem in his bookes / Soo ansuerd a voyce hym ones / Salamon / yf heuynes come to a man by a woman / ne reke thow neuer / For yet shalle there come a woman wherof there shalle come gretter Ioye to man an honderd tymes more than this heuynesse geueth sorowe / and that woman shalle be borne of thy lygnage / Tho whan Salamon herd these wordes / he held hym self but a foole / & the trouthe he perceyued by old bookes / Also the holy ghoost shewed hym the comynge of the gloryous vyrgyne marye / Thenne asked he of the voyce / yf hit shold be in the yerde of his lygnage / Nay sayd the voyce but there shalle come a man whiche shalle be a mayde / and the last of your blood / & he shalle be as good a knyght as duke Iosue / thy broder in lawe

¶ Capitulum vj

NOw haue I certefyed the of that thow stodest in doubte / thenne was Salamon glad that there shold come ony suche of his lygnage / but euer he merueylled & studyed who that shold be / And what his name myghte be/ his wyf perceyued that he studyed and thoughte she wolde knowe it at some season / and so she wayted her tyme / & asked of hym the cause of his studyenge / and there he told her alle to gyder how the voyce tolde hym / Wel sayd she / I shalle lete make a shyp of the best wood and moost durable that men maye fynde / Soo Salamon sente for alle the Carpenters of the lond and the best / And whan they had made the shyp / the lady sayd to Salamon / syr sayd she / syn hit is soo that this knyght ouȝte to passe all knyghtes of cheualry whiche haue ben to fore hym / & shall come after hym / More ouer I shalle telle yow sayd she ye shalle goo in to oure lordes temple where is kynge Dauyds suerd your fader / the whiche is the merueylloust and the sharpest that euer was taken in ony knyghtes hand / therfore take that / and take of the pomel / and therto make ye a pomel of precyous stones that it be soo subtylly made that noo man perceyue it / but that they be al one / & after make there an hylte soo merueyllously and wonderly that noo man maye Page  698 [leaf 349v] knowe hit / And after make a merueyllous sheth / And whan ye haue made alle this / I shalle lete make a gyrdel ther to suche as shalle please me / Alle this kynge Salamon dyd lete make as she deuysed / bothe the shyp and alle the remenaunt / And whan the ship was redy in the see to sayle / the lady lete make a grete bedde and merueyllous ryche / and sette her vpon the beddes hede couerd with sylke / and leyd the suerd at the feete / & the gyrdels were of hempe / and there with the kynge was angry / Syr wete ye wel sayd she that I haue none soo hyghe a thynge whiche were worthy to susteyne soo hyhe a suerd / and a mayde shall brynge other knyghtes ther to / but I wote not whanne hit shalle be ne what tyme / and there she lete make a couerynge to the shyp of clothe of sylke that shold neuer rote for no maner of weder / yet went that lady and maade a Carpenter to come to the tree whiche Abel was slayne vnder / Now sayd she carue me oute of this tree as moche woode as wylle make me a spyndyl / A madame sayd he / this is the tree / the whiche our fyrst moder planted / Do hit sayd she or els I shall destroye the / Anone as he beganne to werke / ther cam out droppes of blood / and thenne wold he haue lefte / but she wold not suffre hym // and soo he tooke aweye as moche wood as myȝte make a spyndyl / and soo she made hym to take as moche of the grene tree and of the whyte tree / And whan these thre spyndels were shapen / she made hem to be fastned vpon the selar of the bedde / whanne Salamone sawe this / he sayd to his wyf ye haue done merueyllously / for though alle the world were here ryght now / he coude not deuyse wherfor alle this was made / but oure lord hym self / and thow that hast done hit / wotest not what it shal betoken / Now late hit be sayd she / for ye shal here tydynges sooner than ye wene /

¶ Now shalle ye here a wonderful tale of kyng Salamon and his wyf

¶ Capitulum vij

THat nyght lay Salamon bifore the ship with lytel felauship / And whan he was on slepe / hym thoughte / Page  699 [leaf 350r] there come from heuen a grete company of angels and alyghte in to the ship and took water whiche was broughte by an angel in a vessel of syluer / and sprente alle the shyp / And after he came to the suerd and drewe letters on the hylte / And after wente to the shyps borde / and wrote there other letters / whiche sayd thou man that wylt entre within me / beware that thow be ful within the feythe / for I ne am but feythe & byleue / whanne Salamon aspyed these letters he was abasshed/ soo that he durste not entre / and soo drewe hym abak / and the shyp was anone shouen in the see / and he wente soo faste that he lost fyghte of hym within a lytyl whyle / And thenne a lytyl voyce said / Salamon / the last knyghte of thy lygnage shalle reste in this bedde / Thenne wente Salamon and awaked his wyf / and told her of the aduentures of the shyp /

¶ Now sayth thystory that a grete whyle the thre felawes biheld the bedde / and the thre spyndels / than they were at certayne that they were of naturel colours withoute payntynge / Thenne they lefte vp a clothe whiche was aboue the ground & there fond a ryche purse by semynge / and Percyuale took hit/ And fonde therin a wrytte / & soo he redde hit / and deuysed the maner of the spyndels and of the shyp whens hit came / and by whome it was made / Now sayd Galahad where shall we fynde the gentylwoman / that shalle make newe gyrdels to the suerd / Fair syre sayd Percyuals syster / desmaye yow not / For by the leue of god I shall lete make a gyrdel to the suerd suche one as shalle longe therto / And thenne she opened a boxe and toke oute gyrdels which were semely wroughte with golden thredys / and vpon that were sette ful precyous stones & a ryche buckel of gold / lo lordes said she / here is a gyrdel that oughte to be sette aboute the suerd / And wete ye wel the grettest parte of this gyrdle was made of my here whiche I loued wel whyle that I was a woman of the world / But as soone as I wyst that this aduenture was ordeyned me I clypped of my here / and made this gyrdel in the name of god / ye be wel y fonde said sir Bors / for certes ye haue put vs out of grete payne wherin we shold haue entryd ne had your tydynges ben / Thenne wente the gentilwoman and sette hit on the gyrdel of the suerd / Now sayd the felauship what is the name Page  700 [leaf 350v] of the suerd / and what shalle we calle hit / Truly sayd she the name of the suerd is the suerd with the straunge gyrdels and the shethe meuer of blood / for noo man that hath blood in hym ne shalle neuer see the one party of the shethe whiche was made of the tree of lyf / Thenne they sayd to Galahad In the name of Ihesu Cryste / and praye yow that ye gyrd you with this suerd whiche hath ben desyred so moche in the Realme of Logrys / Now lete me begynne sayd Galahad to grype thys swerd for to gyue yow courage / But wete ye wel hit longeth no more to me than it doth to yow / And thenne he gryped aboute hit with his fyngers a grete dele / And thenne she gyrte hym aboute the myddel with the swerd / Now rek I not though I dye / for now I hold me one of the blessid maydens of the world whiche hath made the worthyest knyght of the world / Damoysel sayd Galahad ye haue done soo moche that I shalle be your knyghte alle the dayes of my lyf / Thenne they wente from that shyp / and wente to the other / And anone the wynde droofe hem in to the see a grete paas but they had no vytaille / but hit befelle that they came on the morne to a Castell that men calle Carteloyse / that was in the marches of Scotlād And whan they had passed the porte / the gentilwoman sayde lordes here be men aryuen that and they wyste that ye were of kynge Arthurs courte / ye shold be assayled anone / Damoysell sayd Galahad he that cast vs oute of the Roche shalle delyuer vs from hem

¶ Capitulum Octauum

SOo hit befelle as they spoken thus / there cam a squyer by them / and asked what they were / and they said they were of kynge Arthurs hows / is that sothe sayd he / Now by my hede sayd he ye be ylle arayed / and thenne torned he ageyn vnto the clyff fortresse / And within a whyle they herd an horne blowe / Thenne a gentylwoman came to hem and asked hem of whens they were / and they told her / Faire lordes sayd she for goddes loue torne ageyne yf ye may / for ye be come vnto youre dethe / Nay they sayd we wille not torne ageyne / for he shalle helpe vs in whos seruyse we ben entred in /

¶ Thenne as they Page  701 [leaf 351r] stode talkynge / there came knyghtes wel armed and bad hem yelde them or els to dye / that yeldyng sayd they shal be noyous to yow / and there with they lete theyr horses renne / and sir Percyual smote the formest to the erthe / and took his hors / & mounted therupon / and the same dyd Galahad / Also Bors serued another soo for they had no horses in that countrey / for they lefte their horses whan they toke their shyp in other countrayes/

¶ And soo whan they were horsed / thenne beganne they to sette vpon them / and they of the Castel fled in to the stronge fortresse / and the thre knyghtes after them in to the Castel / and soo alyghte on foote / and with their swerdes slewe them doune and gate in to the halle / Thenne whan they beheld the grete multytude of peple / that they had slayne / they held them self grete synners / Certes sayd Bors / I wene & god had loued hem that we shold not haue had power to haue slayne hem thus / But they haue done soo moche ageyn our lord that he wold not suffre hem to regne no lenger / Say ye not soo sayd Galahad / for yf they mysdyd ageynst god / the vengeaunce is not ours / but to hym whiche hath power therof / So came there oute of a chamber a good man whiche was a preest and bare goddes body in a coupe / And whanne he sawe hem whiche lay dede in the halle / he was alle abasshed / and Galahad dyd of his helme and kneled doune / and soo dyd his two felawes / syre sayd they haue ye no drede of vs / For we ben of kynge Arthurs courte /

¶ Thenne asked the good man how they were slayn so sodenly / and they told it hym Truly sayd the good man and ye myghte lyue as longe as the world myght endure / ne myghte ye haue done soo grete an almesse dede as this / Sire sayd Galahad I repente me moch in as moche as they were crystened / Nay repente yow not sayd he for they were not crystened / and I shalle telle you hou that I wote of this Castel / here was lord Erle Hernox not but one yere / and he had thre sones good knyghtes of armes and a doughter the fayrest gentylwoman that men knewe / soo tho thre knyghtes loued theyr syster so sore that they brente in loue / and so they lay by her maulgre her hede / And for she cryed to her fader / they slewe her and took their fader / and putte hym in pryson / and woūded hym nygh to the deth / but a cosyn Page  702 [leaf 351v] of hers rescowed hym / And thenne dyd they grete vntrouthe/ they slewe clerkes and preestes / and made bete doune chappels that oure lordes seruyse myght not be serued ne sayd / and this same day her fader sente to me for to be confessid & houseld / but suche shame had neuer man as I had this day with the thre bretheren / but the erle badde me suffer / for he sayde they shold not longe endure / for thre seruauntes of oure lord shold destroye them / and now hit is brought to an ende / And by this maye ye wete our lord is not displeasyd with your dedes Certes sayd Galahad and hit had not pleasyd our lord / neuer shold we haue slayne soo many men in soo lytel a whyle / & thenne they broughte the erle Hernox oute of pryson in to the myddes of the halle that knewe Galahad anone / and yet he sawe hym neuer afore but by reuelacyon of our lord

¶ Capitulum ix

THenne beganne he to wepe ryght tendyrly & said long haue I abyden your comynge / but for goddes loue holdeth me in your armes that my sowle may departe oute of my body in soo good a mans armes as ye be / Gladly sayd Galahad / And thenne one sayd on hyghe that alle herde / Galahad/ wel hast thou auenged me on goddes enemyes / Now behoueth the to goo to the maymed kyng as soone as thow maist / for he shalle receyue by the helthe whiche he hath abyden soo long / and ther with the sowle departed from the body / and Galahad made hym to be buryed as hym ought to be / Ryght soo departed the thre knyghtes and Percyuals syster with them / And soo they came in to a waste foreste / and there they sawe afore them a whyte herte whiche four lyons ladde / Thenne they took hem to assent for to folowe after / for to knowe whydder they repayred and soo they rode after a grete paas til that they cam to a valeye / & ther by was an hermytage where a good man dwellid and the herte and the lyons entryd also / soo whanne they sawe all this / they torned to the chappel / and sawe the good man in a relygyous wede & in the armour of our lord / for he wold synge masse of the holy ghoost / and soo they entryd in & herde Page  703 [leaf 352r] masse / And at the secretys of the masse / they thre sawe the hert become a man / the whiche merueyled hem and sette hym vpon the aulter / in a ryche sege / and sawe the four lyons were chaunged / the one to the forme of a man / the other to the forme of a lyon / and the thyrd to an Egle / and the fourth was chaunged vnto an oxe / thenne toke they her sege / where the herte sat / and wente oute thurgh a glas wyndowe / and there was no thynge perysshed nor broken / and they herd a voyce say in suche a maner entred the sone of god in the wombe of a mayd mary / whos vyrgynyte ne was perysshed ne hurte / & whanne they herd these wordes they felle doune to the erthe / and were astonyed / and ther with was a grete clerenes / And whanne they were come to their self ageyn they wente to the good man and prayd hym that he wold say hem trouthe / What thynge ha ue ye sene sayd he / & they told hym all that they had sene / A lordes sayd he ye be welcome / now wote I wel ye be the good knyghtes / the whiche shal brynge the Sancgreal to an ende / For ye ben they vnto whome oure lord shalle shewe grete secretes / and wel oughte oure lord be sygnefyed to an herte / For the herte whanne he is old / he waxeth yonge ageyne in hys whyte skynne / Ryght soo cometh ageyne oure lord from dethe to lyf / for he lost erthely flesshe that was the dedely flesshe / whyche he had taken in the wombe of the blessid vyrgyn mary / & for that cause appiered oure lord as a whyte herte withoute spot / and the foure that were with hym is to vnderstande the foure euuangelystes whiche sette in wrytynge a parte of Ihesu Crystes dedes that he dyd somtyme whan he was amonge yow an erthely man / for wete ye wel neuer erst ne myghte no knyghte knowe the trouthe / for oftymes or this oure lord shewed hym vnto good men and vnto good knyghtes in lykenes of an herte But I suppose from hens forth ye shalle see no more / and thenne they Ioyed moche / and dwelled ther alle that day /

¶ And vpon the morowe whan they had herde masse / they departed and commaunded the good man to god and soo they came to a Castel and passed by / So there came a knyghte armed after them and sayd lordes herke what I shal saye to yow

Page  704 [leaf 352v]

¶ Capitulum x

THis gentylwoman that ye lede with yow is a mayde / Syr said she / a mayde I am / Thenne he took her by the brydel / and sayd by the holy crosse ye shalle not escape me to fore ye haue yolden the customme of this Castel / lete her go sayd Percyual ye be not wyse / for a mayde in what place she cometh is free / Soo in the meane whyle there came oute a ten or twelue knyghtes armed oute of the Castel / and with hem came gentylwymmen whiche held a dysshe of syluer / and thenne they sayd this gentylwoman must yelde vs the customme of this Castel / sir sayd a knyghte / what mayde passeth here by shalle yeue this dysshe ful of blood of her ryghte arme / blame haue he sayd Galahad that broughte vp suche custommes / and soo god me saue I ensure yow of this gentylwoman ye shal fayle whyle that I lyue / Soo god me help sayd Percyual I had leuer be slayne / and I also sayd sir Bors / By my trouthe sayd the knyght / thenne shalle ye dye / for ye maye not endure ageynste vs / though ye were the best knyghtes of the world / thenne lete they renne eche to other / and the thre felawes bete the ten knyghtes / and thenne sette theire handes to their swerdes and bete them doune and slewe them / Thenne there came oute of the Castel a thre score knyghtes armed / Faire lordes sayd the thre felawes haue mercy on youre selfe and haue not adoo with vs / Nay fayre lordes sayd the knyghtes of the Castel we counceyl yow to withdrawe yow / for ye ben the best knyghtes of the world / and therfore doo no more for ye haue done ynough / We wille lete yow go with this harme but we must nedes haue the customme / Certes sayd Galahad for nought speke ye / wel sayd they / wille ye dye / we be not yet come therto sayd Galahad / thēne beganne they to medle to gyders / and Galahad with the straunge gyrdels drewe his suerd / and smote on the ryght hand and on the lyfte hand & slewe what that euer abode hym / & dyd suche merueils that there was none that sawe hym / they wend he had ben none erthely man but a monstre / and hist two felawes halp hym passyng wel / and soo they held the Iourney eueryche in lyke hard tyl it was nyȝt / thenne must they nedes departe / So cam Page  705 [leaf 353r] in a good knyghte / and sayd to the thre felawes / yf ye wyll come in to nyght / and take suche herberowe as here is / ye shal be ryght welcome / and we shall ensure yow by the feyth of our bodyes / and as we be true knyghtes to leue yow in suche estat to morowe as we fynde yow withoute ony falshede / And as soone as ye knowe of the custome we dare say ye wyll accorde therfor for goddes loue said the gentylwoman goo thyder and spare not for me / Go we sayd Galahad / and soo they entryd in to the chappel / And when they were alyghte / they made grete Ioye of hem / Soo within a whyle the thre knyghtes asked the customme of the Castel and wherefor it was / what hit is sayd they we wille saye yow sothe /

¶ Capitulum xj /

THer is in this Castel a gentylwoman whiche we and this castel is hers and many other / Soo it befelle many yeres agone there fylle vpon her a maladye / And whanne she had layne a grete whyle she felle vnto a mesel / and of no leche she coude haue no remedy / But at the last an old man sayd and she myght haue a dysshe ful of blood of a mayde and a clene vyrgyn in wylle and in werke / And a kynges doughter / that blood shold be her hele / and for to anoynte her with alle / & for this thynge was this customme made Now said Percyuals sister fayr knyȝtes I see wel þt this gentylwoman is but dede / Certes sayd Galahad and ye blede soo moche ye maye dye / Truly sayd she / and I dye for to hele her / I shal gete me grete worship and sowles helthe / and worshyp to my lygnage / and better is one harme than tweyn And therfor ther shall be no more batail but to morne I shall yelde yow your customme of this castel / and thenne there was grete Ioye more than there was to fore / For els had there ben mortal werre vpon the morne / not withstandyng she wold none other whether they wold or nold / that nyght were the thre felawes easyd with the best / & on the morne they herd masse / and sir Percyuals sister bad brynge forth the seke lady / so she was / the whiche was euylle at ease / thenne sayd she who shall Page  706 [leaf 353v] lete me blood / Soo one came forth and lete her blood / and she bled soo moche / that the dysshe was ful / thenne she lyfte vp her hand and blessid her / And thenne she said to the lady / Madame I am come to the dethe for to make yow hole / for goddes loue prayeth for me / with that she felle in a swoune / Thenne Galahad and his two felawes starte vp to her and lyfte her vp and staunched her / but she had bled soo moche that she myght not lyue / Thenne she sayd whan she was awaked fayre broder Percyual I dye for the helynge of this lady / Soo I requyre yow that ye berye me not in this countrey / but as soone as I am dede / put me in a bote at the next hauen / and lete me goo as aduenture will lede me / And as soone as ye thre come to the Cyte of Sarras ther to encheue the holy graile ye shalle fynde me vnder a Towre arryued / and there bery me in the spyrytual place / for I saye yow soo moche there Galahad shalle be buryed and ye also in the same place / Thenne Percyual vnderstood these wordes and graunted it her wepynge / And thenne sayd a voyce lordes and felawes to morowe at the houre of pryme ye thre shalle departe eueryche from other tyl the aduenture brynge yow to the maymed kynge / Thenne asked she her saueour / and as soone as she had receyued hit / the soule departed from the body / Soo the same daye was the lady helyd whan she was enoynted with alle / Thenne syr Percyuale made a letter of all that she had holpen hem as in straunge aduentures / and put hit in her ryght hand and soo leyd her in a barge / and couerd it with blak sylke / and so the wynde aroos / and drofe the barge from the lond & alle knyghtes beheld hit / tyl it was oute of their syghte / Thenne they drewe alle to the Castel / and soo forthe with ther felle a sodeyne tempest and thonder layte and rayne as alle the erthe wold haue broken / Soo half the castel torned vp soo doune / Soo it passed euensonge or the tempest was seaced / Thenne they sawe afore hem a knyghte armed and wounded hard in the body and in the hede that sayd O god socoure me for now it is nede / After this knyght came another knyghte / & a dwerf whiche cryed to hem afer / stand ye may not escape. / Thenne the wounded knyghte held vp his handes to god that he shold not dye in suche trybulacyon / Truly sayd Galahad Page  707 [leaf 354r] I shalle socoure hym for his sake that he calleth vpon / Sir said Bors I shalle doo hit / for it is not for yow / for he is but one knyghte / Sir sayd he I graunte / So sir Bors toke his hors and commaunded hym to god / and rode after to rescowe the wounded knyghte

¶ Now torne we to the two felawes /

¶ Capitulum xij

NOw saith the story that al nyght Galahad and Percyual were in a chappel in her prayers for to saue sir Bors /

¶ Soo on the morowe they dressid hem in theire harneis toward the Castel to wete what was fallen of them there in / And when they cam there / they fond neyther man ne woman that he ne was dede by the vengeaunce of oure lord / with that they herd a voyce that sayd / this vengeaunce is for blood shedynge of maydens / Also they fonde atte ende of the chappel a Chirche yard / and therin myght they see a thre score fair tombes / and that place was soo fayre and soo delectable that it semed hem there had ben none tempest / For there lay the bodyes of alle the good maydens whiche were martred for the seke ladyes sake / Also they fond the names of eueryche / and of what blood they were come / and alle were of kynges blood & twelue of them were kynges doughters / Thenne they departed and wente in to a foreste / Now said Percyual vnto Galahad we must departe / soo pray we oure lord that we maye mete to gyders in short tyme / thenne they dyd of their helmes and kyssed to gyder / and wepte at their departynge

¶ Capitulum xiij

NOw sayth the history that whan launcelot was come to the water of Mortoyse as hit is reherced before / he was in grete perylle / and soo he leyd hym doune and slepte/ and toke the aduenture that god wold sende hym /

¶ Soo whan he was a slepe / there came a vysyon vnto hym and said Launcelot aryse vp & take thyn armour / and entre in to the first ship that thow shalt fynde /

¶ And when he herd these wordes he starte vp and sawe grete clerenes about Page  708 [leaf 354v] hym / And thenne he lyfte vp his hande and blessid hym and so toke his armes and made hym redy / and soo by aduenture he came by a stronde / & fonde a shyp the which was withoute sayle or ore / And as soone as he was within the shyp there he felte the moost swetnes that euer he felt / and he was fulfylled with alle thynge that he thought on or desyred / Thenne he sayd Fair swete fader Ihesu Cryst I wote not in what Ioye I am For this Ioye passeth alle erthely Ioyes that euer I was in And soo in this ioye he leyd hym doune to the shyps borde / & slepte tyl day / And when he awoke / he fonde there a fayre bed & therin lyenge a gentylwoman dede / the whiche was syr percyuals syster / And as launcelot deuysed her / he aspyed in hir ryght hand a wrytte / the whiche he redde / the whiche told hym all the aduentures that ye haue herd to fore / and of what lygnage she was come / Soo with this gentylwoman sir launcelot was a moneth and more / yf ye wold aske how he lyued / he that fedde the peple of Israel with manna in deserte / soo was he fedde / For euery day when he had sayd his prayers / he was susteyned with the grace of the holy ghoost / So on a nyghte he wente to playe hym by the water syde / for he was somwhat wery of the shyp / And thenne he lystned and herd an hors come / And one rydynge vpon hym / And whanne he cam nygh he semed a knyghte / And soo he lete hym passe / and wente there as the shyp was / and there he alyghte / and toke the sadel and the brydel and putte the hors from hym / and went in to the ship / And thenne Launcelot dressid vnto hym and said ye be welcome / and he ansuerd and salewed hym ageyne / & asked hym what is your name / for moche my hert gyueth vnto yow / Truly sayd he my name is launcelot du lake / sir saide he / thēne be ye welcome / for ye were the begynner of me in this world / A sayd he ar ye Galahad / ye forsothe sayd he / and so he kneled doune and asked hym his blessynge / and after toke of his helme and kyssed hym / And there was grete Ioye bitwene them / for there is no tonge can telle the Ioye that they made eyther of other / and many a frendely word spoken bitwene / as kynde wold / the whiche is no nede here to be reherced/ And there eueryche told other of theire aduentures and merueils that were befallen to them in many Iourneyes sythe Page  709 [leaf 355r] that they departed from the courte / Anone as Galahad sawe the gentilwoman dede in the bed / he knewe her wel ynough / & told grete worship of her that she was the best mayde lyuyng and hit was grete pyte of her dethe / But whanne Launcelot herd how the merueylous swerd was goten / and who made hit / and alle the merueyls reherced afore / Thenne he prayd galahad his sone that he wold shewe hym the suerd / and so he dyd / and anone he kyssed the pomel and the hyltes and the scaubard / Truly sayd launcelot neuer erst knewe I of so hyhe aduentures done and so merueyllous & straunge / So dwellid Launcelot and Galahad within that shyp half a yere / and serued god dayly and nyghtly with alle their power / and often they aryued in yles ferre from folke / where there repayred none but wylde beestes / and ther they fond many straunge aduentures and peryllous whiche they broughte to an ende / but for tho aduentures were with wylde beestes / and not in the quest of the Sancgreal / therfor the tale maketh here no mencyon therof / for it wolde be to longe to telle of alle tho aduentures that befelle them

¶ Capitulum xiiij

SOo after on a mondaye hit befelle that they aryued in the edge of a foreste to fore a crosse / and thenne sawe they a knyghte armed al in whyte and was rychely horsed/ and ledde in his ryght hand a whyte hors / and soo he cam to the shyp and salewed the two knyghtes on the hyghe lordes behalf / and sayd Galahad syr ye haue ben longe ynough with your fader / come oute of the ship / and starte vpon this hors / & goo where the aduentures shall lede the in the quest of the sancgreal / thenne he wente to his fader and kyst hym swetely and sayd / Fair swete fader I wote not whan I shal see you more tyl I see the body of Ihesu Cryst / I praye yow sayd launcelot praye ye to the hyghe fader that he hold me in his seruyse & soo he took his hors / & ther they herd a voyce that sayd thynke for to doo wel / for the one shal neuer see the other before the dredeful day of dome / Now sone galahad said laūcelot syn we shal departe / & neuer see other / I pray to þe hyȝ fader to conserue Page  710 [leaf 355v] me and yow bothe / Sire said Galahad noo prayer auaylleth soo moche as yours / And there with Galahad entryd in to the foreste / And the wynde aroos and drofe Launcelot more than a moneth thurgh oute the see where he slepte but lytyl but prayed to god that he myght see some tydynges of the Sancgreal / Soo hit befelle on a nyghte at mydnyghte he aryued afore a Castel on the bak syde whiche was ryche and fayre / & there was a posterne opened toward the see / and was open withoute ony kepynge / sauf two lyons kept the entre / and the moone shone clere / Anone sir launcelot herd a voyce that sayd Launcelot goo oute of this shyp / and entre in to the Castel / where thou shalt see a grete parte of thy desyre / Thenne he ran to his armes and soo armed hym / and soo wente to the gate and sawe the lyons / Thenne sette he hand to his suerd & drewe hit / Thenne there came a dwerf sodenly and smote hym on the harme so sore that the suerd felle oute of his hand / Thenne herd he a voyce say O man of euylle feyth and poure byleue wherfor trowest thow more on thy harneis than in thy maker/ for he myghte more auayle the than thyn armour in whos seruyse that thou arte sette / Thenne said launcelot / fay u fader ihesu Cryste I thanke the of thy grete mercy that thou repreuest me of my mysdede / Now see I wel that ye hold me for youre seruaunt / thenne toke he ageyne his suerd and putte it vp in his shethe and made a crosse in his forhede / and came to the lyons / and they made semblaunt to doo hym harme / Notwithstandynge he passed by hem without hurte and entryd in to the castel to the chyef fortresse / and there where they al at rest / thenne Launcelot entryd in so armed / for he fond noo gate nor dore but it was open / And at the last he fond a chamber wherof the dore was shytte / and he sette his hand therto to haue opened hit / but he myghte not

Capitulum xv

THenne he enforced hym mykel to vndoo the dore / thenne he lystned and herd a voyce whiche sange so swetely that it semed none erthely thynge / and hym thoughte the voyce said Ioye and honour be to the fader of heuen / Thenne Page  711 [leaf 356r] Launcelot kneled doun to fore the chamber / for wel wyst he that there was the Sancgreal within that chamber / Thenne sayd he Fair swete fader Ihesu Cryst yf euer I dyd thyng that pleasyd the lord / for thy pyte ne haue me not in despyte for my synnes done afore tyme / and that thou shewe me some thynge of that I seke / And with that he sawe the chamber dore open and there came oute a grete clerenes / that the hows was as bryghte as all torches of the world had ben there / So cam he to the chamber dore / and wold haue entryd / And anone a voyce said to hym / Flee launcelot / and entre not / for thou oughtest not to doo hit / And yf thou entre / thou shalt forthynke hit / Thenne he withdrewe hym abak ryght heuy / Thenne loked he vp in the myddes of the chamber / and sawe a table of syluer and the holy vessel couerd with reed samyte / and many angels aboute hit / wherof one helde a candel of waxe brennyng and the other held a crosse and the ornementys of an aulter And bifore the holy vessel he sawe a good man clothed as a preest / And it semed that he was at the sacrynge of the masse And it semed to Launcelot that aboue the preestes handes were thre men wherof the two putte the yongest by lykenes bitwene the preestes handes / and soo he lyfte hit vp ryght hyhe / & it semed to shewe so to the peple / And thenne launcelot merueyled not a lytyl / For hym thouȝt the preest was so gretely charged of the fygure that hym semed that he shold falle to the erthe / And whan he sawe none aboute hym that wolde helpe hym / Thenne came he to the dore a grete paas and sayd / Faire fader Ihesu Cryst ne take hit for no synne though I helpe the good man whiche hath grete nede of help / Ryghte soo entryd he in to the chamber and cam toward the table of syluer / and whanne he came nyghe he felte a brethe that hym thoughte hit was entremedled with fyre whiche smote hym so sore in the vysage that hym thoughte it brente vysage / and there with he felle to the erthe and had no power to aryse / as he that was soo araged that had loste the power of his body and his herynge and his seynge

¶ Thenne felte he many handes aboute hym whiche tooke hym vp / and bare hym oute of the chamber dore / withoute ony amendynge of his swoune / and lefte hym there semyng dede to Page  712 [leaf 356v] of the chamber dore and lefte hym there semynge dede to al peple / Soo vpon the morowe whan it was fayre day they within were arysen / and fonde Launcelot lyenge afore the chamber dore / Alle they merueylled how that he cam in / and so they loked vpon hym and felte his pouse to wyte whether there were ony lyf in hym / and soo they fond lyf in hym / but he myght not stande nor stere no membre that he had / and soo they tooke hym by euery parte of the body / and bare hym in to chamber and leyd hym in a ryche bedde ferre from alle folke / and soo he lay four dayes / Thenne the one sayd he was on lyue / and the other sayd Nay / In the name of god sayd and old man / for I doo yow veryly to wete / he is not dede / but he is soo fulle of lyf as the myghtyest of yow alle / and therfor I counceylle yow that he be wel kepte tyl god send hym ageyne /

¶ Capitulum xvj

IN suche maner they kepte launcelot four and twenty dayes and also many nyghtes that euer he laye stylle as a dede man / and at the xxv daye byfelle hym after myddaye that he opened his eyen / and whan he sawe folke he made grete sorowe and sayd why haue ye awaked me / for I was more at ease than I am now / O Ihesu Cryst who myghte be soo blessid that myght see openly thy grete merueyls of secretenes there where no synnar may be / what haue ye sene sayd they aboute hym / I haue sene said he so grete merueyls that no tong may telle / and more than ony herte can thynke / & had not my sone ben here afore me I had sene moche more / Thenne they told hym how he had layne there four and twenty dayes and nyghtes / thenne hym thoughte hit was punysshement for the four and twenty yeres that he had ben a synner wherfore our lord put hym in penaunce four and twenty dayes and nyghtes Thenne loked syr launcelot afore hym / & sawe the hayre whiche he had borne nyghe a yere / for that he forthoughte hym ryȝte moche that he had broken his promyse vnto the heremyte whiche he had auowed to doo /

¶ Thenne they asked how hit stood with hym / for sothe sayd he I am hole of body thanked be our Page  713 [leaf 357r] lord / therfore syrs for goddes loue telle me where that I am / thenne sayd they alle that he was in the Castel of Carbonek / there with came a gentylwoman / and brought hym a sherte of smal lynen clothe / but he chaunged not there / but toke the hayre to hym ageyne / Sir sayd they the quest of the Sancgreal is encheued now ryght in yow / that neuer shalle ye see of the Sancgreal nomore than ye haue sene / Now I thanke god said Launcelot of his grete mercy of that I haue sene / for it suffyseth me / for as I suppose no man in this world hath lyued better than I haue done to enchere that I haue done / And ther with he took the hayre and clothed hym in hit / and aboue that he put a lynen sherte / & after a Robe of Scarlet fresshe & newe / And whanne he was soo arayed / they merueylled alle / for they knewe hym that he was launcelot the good knyghte And thenne they sayd alle O my lord sir launcelot be that ye and he sayd Truly I am he / Thenne came word to kyng pelles that the knyght that had layne soo longe dede was sir launcelot / thenne was the kynge ryght glad / and wente to see hym / And whanne launcelot sawe hym come / he dressid hym ageynste hym / and there made the kyng grete Ioye of hym / and there the kynge told hym tydynges / that his fayre doughter was dede / Thenne launcelot was ryght heuy of hit / and sayd / syre me forthynketh of the dethe of your doughter / for she was a ful fayre lady / fresshe / and yonge / and wel I wote she bere the best knyghte that is now on erthe or that euer was sith god was borne / So the kynge held hym there four dayes / and on the morowe he took his leue at kynge Pelles and at al the felauship and thanked them of the grete labour / Ryghte soo as they sat at her dyner in the chyef sale / thenne was so befalle that the Sancgreal had fulfylled the tables with al maner of metes that ony herte myghte thynke /

¶ Soo as they sate / they sawe alle the dores and the wyndowes of the place were shitte withoute mannys hand / wherof they were al abasshed / and none wyste what to doo

¶ And thenne it happed sodenly a knyghte cam to the chyefe dore and knocked / and cryed / vndo the dore / but they wold not / and euer he cryed vndoo / but they wold not / And atte laste it noyed hem soo moche that the kynge hym self arose and Page  714 [leaf 357v] came to a wyndowe there where the knyght called / Thenne he said syr knyght ye shall not entre at this tyme whyle the sancgreal is here / and therfor goo in to another / For certes ye be none of the knyȝtes of the quest / but one of them whiche hath serued the fende / and hast lefte the seruyse of oure lord / and he was passynge wrothe at the kynges wordes / Sir knyght sayd the kynge syn ye wold so fayn entre / saye me of what coūtrey ye be / Sir sayd he I am of the Realme of Logrys / and my name is Ector de marys / and broder vnto my lord sir laūcelot / In the name of god sayd the kynge / me forthynketh of that I haue sayd for youre broder is here within / & whan Ector de marys vnderstood that his broder was there / for he was the man in the world that he moost dredde and loued / And thenne he sayd A god now doubleth my sorowe and shame / ful truly sayd the good man of the hylle vnto Gawayne and to me of oure dremes / Thenne wente he oute of the courte as fast as his hors myghte / and soo thurgh oute the Castel

¶ Capitulum xvij

THenne kynge Pelles came to sire Launcelot and told hym tydynges of his broder wherof he was sory that he wyste not what to doo / Soo sir launcelot departed and toke his armes and sayd he wold goo see the realme of Logrys / whiche I haue no sene in twelue moneth / and there with commaunded the kynge to god / and soo rode thurgh many realmes / And at the last he came to a whyte Abbay / And there they made hym that nyghte grete chere / And on the morne he aroos and herd masse / and afore an aulter he fond a ryche Tombe whiche was newely made / And thenne he took hede / & sawe the sydes wryten with gold / whiche sayd

¶ Here lyeth kynge Bagdemagus of Gore whiche kynge Arthurs neuew slewe and named hym syr Gawayn / Thenne was not he a lytel sory / for launcelot loued hym moche more than ony other and had it ben ony other than Gawayne he shold not haue escared from dethe to lyf / and sayd to hym self A lord god this is a grete hurte vnto kynge Arthurs courte the losse of suche Page  715 [leaf 358r] a man / And thenne he departed / and came to the Abbay where Gatahad dyd the aduenture of the tombes / and wanne the whyte sheld with the reed crosse / and there had he grete chere alle that nyghte / and on the morne he torned vnto Camelot / where he fonde kynge Arthur and the quene / But many of the knyghtes of the round table were slayne and destroyed more than half / and soo thre were come home / Ector Gawayne and Lyonel and many other that neden not to be reherced / and alle the Courte was passyng gladde of syr launcelot / and the kynge asked hym many tydynges of his sone Galahad / and ther Launcelot told the kynge of his aduentures that had befallen hym syn he departed / and also he told hym of the aduentures of Galahad Percyuale and Bors whiche that he knewe by the letter of the dede damoysel / And as Galahad had told hym Now god wold sayd the kynge that they were all thre here / that shalle neuer be said launcelot / for two of hem shalle ye neuer see but one of hem shalle come ageyne /

¶ Now leue we this story and speke of Galahad

¶ Capitulum xviij

NOw saith the story Galahad rode many Iorneyes invayne / And at the last he cam to the Abbay where kyng Mordrayns was / and whan he herd that he thouȝte he wold abyde to see hym / And vpon the morne whanne he had herd masse Galahad came vnto kyng Mordrayns / And anon the kynge sawe hym the whiche had leyne blynd of long tyme And thenne he dressid hym ageynst hym / and said Galahad the seruaunt of Ihesu cryste whos comynge I haue abyden so longe / Now enbrace me and lete me reste on thy brest / So that I may reste bitwene thyn armes / for thow arte a clene vyrgyn aboue all knyghtes as the floure of the lyly / in whome vyrgynyte is sygnefyed /and thou arte the rose the whiche is the floure of al good vertu / & in coloure of fyre / For the fyre of the holy ghoost is take so in the / that my flesshe which was al dede of oldenes / is become yonge ageyne / Thenne Galahad herd his wordes thenne he enbraced hym & alle his body / Page  716 [leaf 358v] Thenne sayd he / Faire lord Ihesu Cryst now I haue my wil Now I requyre the in this poynt that I am in thow come and vysyte me / And anone oure lord herd his prayer / there with the soule departed from the body / And thenne Galahad putte hym in the erthe as a kynge oughte to be / and soo departede / & soo came in to a perillous foreste where he fond the welle / the whiche boylled with grete wawes as the tale telleth to fore / And as soone as Galahad sette his hand therto it seaced / so that it brente no more / and the hete departed / for that it brente hit was a sygne of lechery the whiche was that tyme moche vsed / but that hete myght not abyde his pure vyrgyntye / & this was taken in the countrey for a myrakle / and soo euer after was it called Callahadys welle / Thenne by aduenture he cam in to the countrey of Gore and in to the Abbay where launcelot had ben to fore hand and fonde the tombe of kynge Bagdemagus / but he was founder thereof Ioseph of Armathyes sone and the Tombe of Symyan where launcelot had fayled Thenne he loked in to a Crofte vnder the mynster / and there he sawe a Tombe whiche brent ful merueyllously / Thenne asked he the bretheren what it was / Sir said they a merueyllous aduentur / that may not be broughte vnto none ende / but by hym that passeth of bounte and of knyhthode al them of the round table / I wold sayd Galahad that ye wold lede me ther to / Gladly sayd they / and soo ledde hym tyl a caue / and he went doune vpon gresys / and cam nyghe the tombe / and thenne the flammynge fayled and the fyre staunched the whiche many a day had ben grete / Thenne came there a voyce that sayd moche are ye beholde to thanke oure lord / the whiche hath gyuen yow a good houre that ye may drawe oute the sowles of erthely payne / and to putte them in to the Ioyes of paradys / I am of your kynred the whiche haue dwelled in this hete thys thre honderd wynter and four and fyfty to be purged of the synne that I dyd ageynst Ioseph of Armathye / thenne Galahad toke the body in his armes and bare it in to the mynster And that nyghte lay Galahad in the Abbay / and on the morne he gaf hym seruyse and putte hym in the erthe afore the hyghe Aulter Page  717 [leaf 359r]

¶ Capitulum xix

SOo departed he from thens / and commaunded the bretheren to god / and soo he rode fyue dayes tyl that he came to the maymed kynge / And euer folowed Percyual the fyue dayes askynge where he had ben / and soo one told hym / how the aduentures of Logrys were encheued / So on a daye it befelle that they cam oute of a grete foreste / and there they mette at trauers with sir Bors the whiche rode alone / hit is none nede to telle yf they were glad / & hem he salewed / & they yelded hym honour and good aduenture / and eueryche told other / Thenne said Bors hit is more than a yere and an half that I ne lay ten tymes where men dwelled / but in wylde forestes and in montayns / but god was euer my comforte / Thenne rode they a grete whyle tyl that they came to the castel of Carbonek / And whan they were entryd within the Castel kynge Pelles knewe hem / thenne there was grete Ioye / For they wyst wel by theire comynge that they had fulfylled the quest of the Sancgreal / Thenne Elyazar kynge Pelles sone broughte to fore hem the broken suerd where with Ioseph was stryken thurgh the thygh / Thenne Bors sette his hand therto / yf that he myght haue souded hit ageyne but it wold not be / Thenne he took it to Percyual but he had no more power therto than he / Now haue ye hit ageyne sayd Percyuall to Galahad / for and it be euer encheued by ony bodely man / ye must doo hit / and thenne he took the pyeces and sette hem to gyders and they semed that they had neuer ben broken / and as well as hit had ben fyrst forged / And whanne they within aspyed that the aduenture of the suerd was encheued / thenne they gaf the suerd to Bors / for hit myght not be better set / for he was a good knyghte and a worthy man / and a lytel afore euen the suerd arose grete and merueyllous / and was ful of grete hete that many men felle for drede / And anone alyght a voys amonge them and sayd they that ought not to sytte at the table of Ihesu Cryst / aryse / for now shalle veray knyghtes ben fedde / Soo they wente thens all sauf kynge Pelles and Elyazar his sone / the whiche were holy men and a mayde which was his nece / and soo these thre felawes and they thre were Page  718 [leaf 359v] there no mo / Anone they sawe knyghtes al armed came in at the halle dore and dyd of their helmes and their armes and sayd vnto Galahad / Sire we haue hyed ryght moche for to be with yow at this table where the holy mete shalle be departed Thenne sayd he ye be welcome / but of whens be ye / So thre of them sayd they were of gaule / and other thre sayd they were of Irland / and the other thre sayd they were of Denmarke / So as they satte thus / there came oute a bed of tree of a chamber / the whiche four gentylwymmen broughte / and in the bed lay a good man seke / and a crowne of gold vpon his hede / & there in the myddes of the place they sette hym doune and wente ageyne their waye / Thenne he lyfte vp his hede and sayd Galahad knyght ye be welcome / for moche haue I desyred your comynge / for in suche payne and in suche anguysshe I haue ben longe /

¶ But now I truste to god the terme is come that my payn shall be alayed that I shall passe oute of this world so as it was promysed me longe ago / there with a voyce sayd ther be two amonge you that be not in the quest of the Sancgreal and therfor departe ye

¶ Capitulum xx

THenne kynge Pelles and his sone departed / and there with alle besemed that there cam a man and four angels from heuen clothed in lykenes of a Bisshop / and had a crosse in his hand / and these foure angels bare hym vp in a chayer / and sette hym doune before the table of syluer where vpon the Sancgreal was / and it semed that he had in myddes of his forhede letters the whiche sayd / See ye here Ioseph the fyrst Bisshop of Crystendome the same whiche our lord socoured in the Cyte of Sarras in the spyrytuel place / Thenne the knyghtes merueylled / for that Bisshop was dede more than thre honderd yere to fore / O knyghtes sayde he / merueyle not / For I was somtyme an erthely man / with that they herde the chamber dore open / and there they sawe Angels and two bare candels of waxe / and the thyrd a towel / and the fourthe a spere whiche bled merueillously that thre droppes felle within Page  719 [leaf 360r] a boxe whiche he helde with other hand / And they sette the candels vpon the table / and the thyrd the towel vpon the vessel / and the fourth the holy spere euen vp ryghte vpon the vessel / And thenne the Bisshop made semblaunt as thouȝ he wold haue gone to the sacrynge of the masse / And thenne he tooke an vbblye whiche was made in lykenes of breed / And at the lyftynge vp / there came a fygur in lykenes of a chyld / and the vysage was as reed and as bryghte as ony syre & smote hym self in to the breed / so that they all sawe hit that the breed was formed of a flesshely man / and thenne he putte hit in to the holy vessel ageyne / and thenne he dyd that longed to a preest to doo to a masse / And thenne he wente to Galahad and kyssed hym / and badde hym goo and kysse his felawes / and soo he dyd anone / Now sayd he seruauntes of Ihesu Cryste ye shall be fedde afore this table with swete metes that neuer knyghtes tasted / And whanne he had sayd / he vanysshed awey And they sette hem at the table in grete drede and made their prayers / thenne loked they and sawe a man come oute of the holy vessel that had alle the sygnes of the passion of Ihesu Cryste bledynge alle openly / and sayd my knyghtes and my seruauntes & my true children whiche ben come oute of dedely lyf in to spyrytual lyf I wyl now no lenger hyde me from yow / but ye shal see now a parte of my secretes & of my hydde thynges / Now holdeth and receyueth the hyghe mete whiche ye haue soo moche desyred / Thenne took he hym self the holy vessel and came to Galahad / and he kneled doune / and there he receyued his saueour / and after hym soo receyued alle his felawes / and they thoughte it soo swete that hit was merueillous to telle / Thenne sayd he to Galahad / sone wotest thow what I hold betwixe my handes / Nay sayd he / but yf ye will telle me / This is sayd he the holy dysshe wherin I ete the lambe on sherthursdaye / And now hast thou sene that thou most desyred to see / but yet haste thou not sene hit soo openly as thow shalt see it in the Cyte of Sarras in the spyrituel place Therfore thow must go hens and bere with the this holy vessel For this nyght it shall departe from the Realme of Logrys / that it shalle neuer be sene more here / and wotest thou wherfor for he is not serued nor worshypped to his ryghte by them of Page  720 [leaf 360v] this land / for they be torned to euylle lyuynge / therfor I shall disheryte them of the honour whiche I haue done hem / And therfore goo ye thre to morowe vnto the see where ye shal fynde your shyp redy / & with you take the suerd with the straunge gyrdels and no mo with yow but sire Percyual and syre Bors / Also I will that ye take with you of the blood of this spere for to enoynte the maymed kynge bothe his legges and alle his body and he shalle haue his hele / Sire sayd Galahad why shalle not these other felawes goo with vs / for this cause For ryght as I departed my postels one here and another there soo I wille that ye departe / and two of yow shalle dye in my seruyse / but one of yow shal come ageyne and telle tydynges / Thenne gaf he hem his blessynge and vanysshed awaye /

¶ Capitulum xxj

ANd Galahad wente anone to the spere whiche lay vpon the table / and touched the blood with his fyngers and came after to the maymed kynge and anoynted his legges / and there with he clothed hym anone / and starte vpon his feet oute of his bedde as an hole man / and thanked oure lorde that he had helyd hym / and that was not to the world ward / For anone he yelded hym to a place of Relygyon of whyte monkes and was a ful holy man / That same nyghte aboute mydnyght came a voyce amonge hem whiche sayde my sones & not my chyef sones my frendes and not my werryours / goo ye hens where ye hope best to doo and as I bad yow / A thanked be thou lord that thou wilt vouchesaufe to calle vs thy synners Now maye we wel preue that we haue not lost our paynes / And anone in alle haste they took their harneis and departed But the thre knyghtes of Gaule one of them hyghte Claudyne kynge Claudas sone / and the other two were grete gentylmen / thenne praid galahad to eueryche of them that yf they come to kynge Arthurs court that they sholde salewe my lorde sir launcelot my fader and of hem of the round table / and prayed hem yf that they cam on that party that they shold not forgete it / Ryght soo departed Galahad / Percyual / and Bors Page  721 [leaf 361r] with hym / and soo they rode thre dayes / and thenne they came to a Ryuage and fonde the shyp wherof the tale speketh of to fore / And whanne they cam to the borde / they fonde in the myddes the table of syluer / whiche they had lefte with the maymed kynge and the Sancgreal whiche was couerd with rede samyte / Thenne were they gladde to haue suche thynges in theyr felaushyp / and soo they entryd / and maade grete reuerence ther to / and Galahad felle in his prayer longe tyme to oure lord that at what tyme he asked that he shold passe out of this world / soo moche he prayd tyl a voyce sayd to hym Galahad thou shalt haue thy request / And whan thow askest the dethe of thy body thou shalt haue it / & thenne shalt thow fynde the lyf of the soule / Percyual herd this / and prayd hym of felauship that was bitwene them to telle hym wherfor he asked suche thynges / That shalle I telle yow said Galahad / thother day whanne we sawe a parte of the aduentures of the Sancgreal I was in suche a Ioye of herte that I trowe neuer man was / that was erthely / And therfore I wote wel whan my body is dede / my sowle shalle be in grete Ioye to see the blessid Trynyte euery day / and the mageste of oure lord Ihesu Cryst Soo longe were they in the shyp / that they sayd to Galahad syr in this bedde ought ye to lye / for soo saith the scrypture / & soo he leyd hym doune and slepte a grete whyle / And whan he awaked he loked afore hym and sawe the Cyte of Sarras And as they wold haue landed / they sawe the shyp wherein Percyual had putte his syster in / Truly sayd Percyual in the name of god / wel hath my syster holden vs couenaunt / Thenne toke they out of the ship the table of syluer / and he tooke it to Percyual and to Bors to goo to fore / and Galahad came behynde / and ryght soo they went to the Cyte / and at the gate of the Cyte they sawe an old man croked / Thenne Galahad called hym and bad hym helpe to bere this heuy thynge / Truly said the old man / it is ten yere ago that I myȝt not goo but with crouchys / Care thou not sayd Galahad and aryse vp and shewe thy good wille / and soo he assayed / and fonde hym self as hole as euer he was / Thenne ranne he to the table / and took one parte ageynst Galahad / and anone arose there grete noyse in the Cyte that a cryppyl was maade hole by Page  722 [leaf 361v] knyghtes merueyls that entryd in to the Cyte / Thenne anon after the thre knyghtes wente to the water / and broughte vp in to the paleys Percyuals syster / and buryed her as rychely as a kynges doughter oughte to be / And whan the kynge of the Cyte whiche was cleped Estorause sawe the felaushyp / he asked hem of whens they were / and what thyng it was that they had broughte vpon the table of syluer / & they told hym the trouthe of the Sancgreal and the power whiche that god had sette there / Thenne the kynge was a Tyraunt / and was come of the lyne of paynyms / and toke hem / and putte hem in pryson in a depe hole

Capitulum xxij

BVt as soone as they were there oure lord sente hem the Sancgreal / thorow whoos grace they were al waye fulfylled whyle that they were in pryson / Soo at the yeres ende hit befelle that this kynge Estourause lay seke and felte that he shold dye / Thenne he sente for the thre knyghtes & they came afore hym / and he cryed hem mercy of that he had done to them / and they forgaf hit hym goodely and he dyed anone / Whanne the kynge was dede / alle the cyte was desmayed and wyst not who myghte be her kynge /

¶ Ryght soo as they were in counceille there came a voyce amonge them / and badde hem chese the yongest knyght of them thre to be her kynge for he shalle wel mayntene yow and all yours / Soo they made Galahad kynge by alle the assente of the hole Cyte / & els they wold haue slayne hym / And whanne he was come to beholde the land / he lete make aboue the table of syluer a cheste of gold and of precyous stones that hylled the holy vessel / And euery day erly the thre felawes wold come afore hit / & make their prayers / Now at the yeres ende the self daye after Galahad had borne the croune of gold / he arose vp erly and his felawes / and came to the palais / and sawe to fore hem the holy vessel / and a man knelynge on his knees in lykenes of a Bisshop that had aboute hym a grete felaushyp of Angels as it had ben Ihesu Cryst hym self / & thenne he arose Page  723 [leaf 362r] and beganne a masse of oure lady / And whan he cam to the sacrament of the masse / and had done / anone he called Galahad and sayd to hym come forthe the seruaunt of Ihesu cryst and thou shalt see that thou hast moche desyred to see / & thenne he beganne to tremble ryght hard / whan the dedely flesshe beganne to beholde the spyrytuel thynges / Thenne he helde vp his handes toward heuen / and sayd lord I thanke the / for now I see that that hath ben my desyre many a daye /

¶ Now blessyd lord wold I not lenger lyue yf it myghte please the lord / & there with the good man tooke oure lordes body betwixe hys handes / and proferd it to Galahad / and he receyued hit ryghte gladly and mekely /

¶ Now wotest thow what I am sayd the good man / Nay said Galahad / I am Ioseph of Armathye the whiche oure lord hath sente here to the to bere the felaushyp / and wotest thou wherfor that he hath sente me more than ony other / For thou hast resemblyd in to thynges in that thou hast sene the merueyles of the Sancgreal in that thou hast ben a clene mayden as I haue ben and am / And whanne he had said these wordes Galahad went to Percyual and kyssed hym & commaunded hym to god / and soo he wente to sire Bors / & kyssed hym / and commaunded hym to god / and sayd Fayre lord salewe me to my lord syr launcelot my fader / And as soone as ye see hym / byd hym remembre of this vnstable world And there with he kneled doune tofore the table / and made his prayers / and thenne sodenly his soule departed to Ihesu Crist and a grete multitude of Angels bare his soule vp to heuen / that the two felawes myghte wel behold hit / Also the two felawes sawe come from heuen an hand / but they sawe not the body / And thenne hit cam ryght to the vessel / and took it and the spere / and soo bare hit vp to heuen / Sythen was there neuer man soo hardy to saye that he had sene the Sancgreal /

Capitulum xxiij

WHanne Percyual & Bors sawe Galahad dede / they made as moche sorowe as euer dyd two men / And yf they had not ben good men / they myght lyghtly haue fallen in despair / & the peple of the countrey & of the cyte were ryȝt heuy Page  724 [leaf 362v] And thenne he was buryed / And as soone as he was buryed sire Percyual yelded hym to an hermytage oute of the cyte / and took a relygyous clothynge / and Bors was alwaye with hym / but neuer chaunged he his seculer clothyng for that he purposed hym to goo ageyne in to the Realme of Logrys / Thus a yere and two monethes lyued sir Percyual in the hermytage a ful holy lyf / and thenne passed oute of this world and Bors lete bery hym by his syster and by Galahad in the spyrytueltees / whanne Bors sawe that he was in so fer countreyes as in the partyes of Babyloyne he departed from Sarras / and armed hym and cam to the see / and entryd in to a shyp / and soo it befelle hym in good aduenture / he cam in to the Realme of Logrys / and he rode so fast tyl he came to Camelot where the kynge was / and thenne was there grete Ioye made of hym in the Courte / for they wend alle / he had ben dede / for as moche as he had ben soo longe oute of the countrey / and whan they had eten / the kynge made grete clerkes to come afore hym / that they shold cronycle of the hyghe aduentures of the good knyghtes / Whanne Bors had told hym of the aduentures of the Sancgreal suche as had befalle hym / and his thre felawes that was launcelot / Percyual / Galahad / & hym self There Launcelot told the aduentures of the Sancgreal / that he had sene / Alle this was made in grete bookes / and put vp in almeryes at Salysbury / And anone sir Bors sayd to syre Launcelot / Galahad your owne sone salewed yow by me / & after yow kynge Arthur / and alle the Courte / and soo dyd sir Percyual / for I buryed hem with myn owne handes in the Cyte of Sarras /

¶ Also sire Launcelot Galahad prayed yow to remembre of this vnsyker world as ye behyght hym whan ye were to gyders more than half a yere / This is true sayd launcelot / Now I truste to god his prayer shalle auayle me / thenne Launcelot took syr Bors in his armes / and sayd gentyl cosyn ye are ryght welcome to me / and alle that euer I maye doo for yow and for yours ye shalle fynde my poure body redy atte all tymes / whyles the spyryte is in hit / and that I promyse yow feythfully / and neuer to fayle

¶ And wete ye wel gentyl cosyn syre Bors that ye and I wylle neuer departe in Page  725 [leaf 363r] sonder whylest oure lyues may laste / Sir sayd he I wylle as ye wylle

¶ Thus endeth thistory of the Sancgreal that was breuely drawen oute of Frensshe in to Englysshe / the whiche is a story cronycled for one of the truest and the holyest that is in thys world / the whiche is the xvij book /

¶ And here foloweth the eyghtenth book

 
 
 

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